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Cream of Wheat to remove Black chef mascot from the box as it updates imagery in wake of calls for racial equality – USA TODAY

, USA TODAY
Published 11:46 a.m. ET Sept. 26, 2020 | Updated 12:45 p.m. ET Sept. 26, 2020

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Some brands are beginning to alter their names and logos as they face increasing pressure to diversify and combat racism.

USA TODAY

The smiling Black chef will soon come off the boxes of Cream of Wheat.

More than three months after Cream of Wheat’s parent company, B&G Foods, said it was “initiating an immediate review” of the brand’s packaging, a decision has been made – the chef will be removed.

In rapid succession back in mid-June, several companies announced they would retire racial imagery from their branding from Aunt Jemima to Mrs. Butterworth’s in the wake of renewed calls for racial equality.

Experts say the branding announcements are a ripple effect from the Black Lives Matters protests over the police killing of George Floyd and other African Americans.

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Mars Inc. also announced this week that its 70-year-old Uncle Ben’s rice brand will be renamed Ben’s Original and will drop the logo.

Packaging with the new rice name will hit stores next year and the new Cream of Wheat packaging is expected to be unveiled early next year.

Pimento cheese chase: Costco reportedly pulls Palmetto Cheese after founder calls Black Lives Matter a ‘terror organization’

New name for Uncle Ben’s: Popular rice brand will soon be known as Ben’s Original

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“For years, the image of an African-American chef appeared on our Cream of Wheat packaging,” B&G Foods said in a statement to USA TODAY. “While research indicates the image may be based upon an actual Chicago chef named Frank White, it reminds some consumers of earlier depictions they find offensive. Therefore, we are removing the chef image from all Cream of Wheat packaging.”

The breakfast cereal of enriched farina has long been criticized for the use of a smiling Black chef on its packaging, which has appeared there since the 1890s. The mascot on early boxes was known as Rastus, a racial caricature of a Black man, which is considered derogatory.

“We understand there are concerns regarding the Chef image, and we are committed to evaluating our packaging and will proactively take steps to ensure that we and our brands do not inadvertently contribute to systemic racism,” B&G Foods said in a June news release. “B&G Foods unequivocally stands against prejudice and injustice of any kind.”

The company said in its statement to USA TODAY that it has a “new philanthropic initiative in recognition of the importance of diversity and inclusion in the culinary community” and “has begun developing relationships with several of the leading culinary schools to help support and aid in the development of African-American and Latinx candidates through various scholarship and other initiatives.”

Palmetto Cheese, which calls itself the top-selling pimento cheese in the U.S., also has begun rebranding to remove the image of Vertrella Brown, a Black cook who popularized the product, from the packaging.

News of the rebranding came after Brian Henry, the founder of the cheese brand and mayor of Pawleys Island, South Carolina, made a public Facebook post on Aug. 25 calling Black Lives Matter a “terror organization.”

Costco reportedly removed the pimento cheese from store shelves after Henry’s post but a representative for the wholesale club said they had no comment when USA TODAY reached out Tuesday.

Contributing: Associated Press

Follow USA TODAY reporter Kelly Tyko on Twitter: @KellyTyko

Read or Share this story: https://www.usatoday.com/story/money/food/2020/09/26/cream-of-wheat-box-black-chef-removal-2021/3546813001/

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cream National

National Ice Cream Day 2020: Today’s best freebies, deals and discounts – AL.com

Ice cream

Today is National Ice Cream Day.

National Ice Cream Day 2020: Today’s best freebies, deals and discounts

Sunday, July 19 is National Ice Cream day and there are plenty of places where you can score some cold, icy treats.

Here’s a look at the some of the best freebies, deals and discounts for National Ice Cream Day. Not every location may be participating, so be sure to check ahead with your favorite spot.

Baskin Robbins

Get your favorite Baskin Robbins flavor delivered through DoorDash with no delivery fee on orders of $15 or more. Offer good through July 31.

On July 19, you can get a free scoop from Baskin Robbins on orders of $15 or more promo code BASKINSCOOP on DoorDash.com or in the DoorDash app.

Burger King

Score two Oreo cookie shakes for $5 through www.bk.com/offers.

Cold Stone Creamery

Cold Stone Creamery is offering a free Creation with you purchase online. Place an order online, log into your My Cold Stone Club Rewards account at check out and enter code ICECREAM. Not a member? Click here to sign up. Offer valid through July 23.

DoorDash

Use code ICECREAM5OFF through DoorDash for discounts through participating retailers, including CVS and Walgreens.

Godiva

All Godiva Soft Serve and Sundaes will be buy one get one 50% off on Sunday.

Mrs. Fields

Ice cream may be hard to send through delivery but you can check out sweet treats through Mrs. Fields.

Whole Foods Market

Amazon Prime members can enjoy 35% off all ice cream and frozen treats through Tuesday at Whole Foods.

Wolferman’s Bakery

Another non-ice cream but still delicious options are treats through Wolferman’s Bakery. You can order here.

Note to readers: if you purchase something through one of our affiliate links we may earn a commission.

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Ice cream shop closes one day after reopening because customers didn’t follow social distancing rules – CNN

(CNN)Nearly all states partially reopened last week and businesses across the country are preparing to welcome customers back. But because of the coronavirus pandemic, things are far from normal.

An ice cream shop in Massachusetts had to close its doors on Saturday, just one day after reopening, because customers refused to follow social distancing rules and even harassed employees.
Things got so bad at the Polar Cave Ice Cream Parlour in Mashpee that an employee quit the same day.
“One of my best workers quit yesterday at the end of her shift. She stuck it through her shift,” owner Mark Lawrence told CNN affiliate WFXT. “But the words she was called and the language, you wouldn’t even say in a men’s locker room. And to say it to a 17-year-old kid, they should be ashamed of themselves.”
In accordance with reopening guidelines, Lawrence said the shop asked all customers to place their orders at least one hour in advance.
However, many customers ignored the request and showed up without doing so. When the shop got busy, customers took their anger out on the staff, he said.
“Now I open the doors to a whole new world, with gloves and masks and we’re running around like chickens, and people are like where’s my ice cream? I’m not a trauma center, it’s ice cream!” Lawrence told WFXT.
“People have forgotten how to treat other human beings in the six or seven weeks that they’ve been confined to their homes. They have no clue how to respect other human beings.”
After work on Friday, Lawrence expressed his dismay on Facebook: “In 19 years of operation this is the lowest feeling I have ever felt.” The next day he made the difficult decision not to open.
Fortunately, this ice cream shop’s story has a sweet ending.
Those sorrowful posts quickly went viral in Mashpee, eliciting local news coverage and an outpouring of support from the public.
By Sunday, Lawrence had reopened and customers were following the rules.
“Today was a vastly improved operation,” he said on Facebook. “People placed their orders an hour or more (some, a day before) prior to their pick up time. They followed the rules and it worked.”
“Thank you for the incredible outpouring of love and support from so many,” he added. “It truly means so much to me at this time.”

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