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ULA again delays Delta IV Heavy launch due to hardware issues at Cape Canaveral – Florida Today

, Florida Today
Published 1:19 p.m. ET Sept. 26, 2020 | Updated 1:20 p.m. ET Sept. 26, 2020

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A United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket will launch the National Reconnaissance Office’s next payload from Cape Canaveral in August.

Florida Today

Technical issues forced United Launch Alliance to again delay an upcoming Delta IV Heavy rocket launch from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, the company said Saturday.

“Additional time is needed for the team to test and evaluate the swing arm retraction system,” ULA said of the 24-hour delay from early Sunday to early Monday. “As we believe in safety first and are dedicated to mission success, we are taking our time to thoroughly review the data to determine the appropriate path forward.”

Teams at Launch Complex 37 will target no earlier than just after midnight Monday. An exact liftoff time had not yet been decided.

This mission, tasked with launching an intelligence satellite for the National Reconnaissance Office, has been delayed and scrubbed several times beginning in late August due to a series of hardware issues. Most have involved faulty ground support equipment like the swing arm system, pneumatics, and pressure regulators.

If ULA’s latest schedule holds, the Space Force expects 70% “go” weather conditions during the window. Thick and cumulus clouds are the main liftoff concerns.

The Space Coast is trying to fit in three launches before the end of the month, but Delta IV Heavy’s delays are also pushing two upcoming SpaceX missions. This latest shift means a Falcon 9 mission with 60 Starlink satellites at Kennedy Space Center will likely now target around 10 a.m. Tuesday for its liftoff.

A second Falcon 9 at Launch Complex 40 was then slated to fly at 9:55 p.m. Tuesday with a Global Positioning System satellite for the Space Force. But as of Saturday afternoon, it was unknown whether or not SpaceX would have to push this mission to late Wednesday.

See the latest, most up-to-date launch calendar at www.bit.ly/3czB11m.

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Contact Emre Kelly at aekelly@floridatoday.com or 321-242-3715. Follow him on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram at @EmreKelly. Support his space journalism by subscribing at floridatoday.com/specialoffer/.

Launch Monday, Sept. 28

  • Rocket: United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy
  • Mission: Classified National Reconnaissance Office satellite
  • Launch Time: Just after midnight
  • Launch Complex: 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station

Join floridatoday.com/space starting at 10:30 p.m. Sunday for countdown chat and live video.

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delays Disney

Disney delays release of ‘Black Widow,’ ‘West Side Story,’ and more films – Fox News

The coronavirus pandemic has further delayed the release of some highly-anticipated movies including Marvel’s “Black Widow” and director Steven Spielberg’s “West Side Story.”

The Scarlett Johansson Marvel movie “Black Widow,” last set for Nov. 6, heads to May 7 of next year. Instead of opening next month, Kenneth Branagh’s murder mystery “Death on the Nile” moves to Dec. 18. That was the date originally set for “West Side Story,” but Spielberg’s remake of the classic 1961 musical will instead debut in December 2021.

Disney didn’t entirely abandon the season. The Pixar release “Soul” remains on the calendar for late November. “The Empty Man,” a horror release from the former 20th Century Fox, is moving up from December to Oct. 23.

But the delays of Disney’s highly anticipated films reinforce the growing exodus from 2020 among the blockbusters that hadn’t already uprooted to next year.

Following tepid ticket sales for the spy-fi film “Tenet” — in a U.S. theatrical marketplace where about 30% of cinemas remain closed — Warner Bros moved  “Wonder Woman 1984” from October to Christmas. The supernatural slasher tale “Candyman,” from Oscar winner Jordan Peele, has also been postponed by Universal Pictures until next year.

DEBUT OF SPY THRILLER ‘TENET’ MARKS MOVIE THEATERS’ CORONAVIRUS REOPENING

Given the interconnected nature of Marvel releases, the latest delay of “Black Widow” had a domino effect on other films from the comic book kingdom. Destin Daniel Cretton’s “Shang Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings,” starring Simu Liu as the martial arts hero, is now slated for July 9, 2021, instead of May 7. Chloé Zhao “Eternals,” with Angelina Jolie, Gemma Chan and Kumail Nanjiani, moves from February to Nov. 5, 2021.

WARNER BROS. DELAYS ‘THE BATMAN’ 2021 RELEASE BY 4 MONTHS

“Marvel made the right and responsible decision,” Nanjiani said on Twitter. “There’s a pandemic. Nothing is more important than health and lives. I can’t tell people to go to a movie theater until I feel safe going to one.”

The Ben Affleck-Ana de Armas thriller “Deep Water” was also pushed from November until August next year.

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Notably, Disney didn’t announce any films were pivoting to its Disney+ streaming service. Since the pandemic began, the company’s “Mulan,” “Hamilton” and “Artemis Fowl” have gone direct to streaming. “Mulan” was made available for a special $30 premium purchase by subscribers. Disney has declined to share digital grosses for “Mulan,” though the live-action remake has underperformed in theaters overseas.

The Associated Press contributed to this report

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delays SpaceX

SpaceX delays next Starlink satellite fleet launch due to rocket ‘recovery issue’ – Space.com

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket carrying South Korea's ANASIS-II satellite stands atop a Florida launch pad ahead of a July 2src2src launch. The same rocket booster will launch 6src Starlink satellites on Sept. 18, 2src2src.

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket carrying South Korea’s ANASIS-II satellite stands atop a Florida launch pad ahead of a July 2020 launch. The same rocket booster will launch 60 Starlink satellites on Sept. 18, 2020.

(Image: © SpaceX)

SpaceX called off the launch of a new fleet of Starlink internet satellites on Thursday (Feb. 17) due to a “recovery issue” related to the mission’s Falcon 9 rocket.

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket was scheduled to launch 60 new Starlink satellites for the company’s growing megaconstellation at 2:19 p.m. EDT (1819 GMT) Thursday from Pad 39A of NASA’s historic Kennedy Space Center in Florida. But 15 minutes before the planned liftoff, SpaceX scrubbed the mission. 

“Standing down from today’s Starlink launch due to recovery issue; vehicle and payload remain healthy,” SpaceX representatives announced in a Twitter update. “Next launch opportunity is tomorrow, September 18 at 1:57 p.m. EDT, but we are keeping an eye on the weather.”

You’ll be able to watch the launch live here and on the Space.com homepage, courtesy of SpaceX, beginning about 15 minutes before liftoff. You’ll also be able to watch the launch directly via SpaceX here

Related: SpaceX’s Starlink satellite megaconstellation launches in photos

SpaceX did not specify the nature of the “recovery issue,” but it is presumably related to the company’s plan to recover the first stage of the two-stage Falcon 9 rocket by landing it on the company’s drone ship “Just Read the Instructions” in the Atlantic Ocean. Good weather at the floating landing pad is required to ensure a safe landing. 

Today’s launch had a 30% chance of bad weather affecting a liftoff from Pad 39A, according to the U.S. Space Force’s 45th Weather Squadron. The weather forecast grows grim on Friday, with a 70% chance of unfavorable conditions due to thick clouds.

Recovering Falcon 9 rocket boosters is a key part of SpaceX’s plan to reduce the cost of spaceflight while scaling up the company’s launch pace. The Falcon 9 first stage on this mission has already flown twice before this year. It launched SpaceX’s Demo-2 astronaut mission for NASA in May, then flew again in July to deliver the South Korean military satellite ANASIS-II into orbit. 

SpaceX has launched 16 missions so far in 2020, with this flight, called Starlink 12, set to be the 13th Starlink mission since 2019. 

SpaceX has launched more than 700 Starlink satellites into orbit to build a massive constellation designed to provide high-speed broadband internet access around the world. The company initially plans to build a constellation of 1,400 satellites, with a core of between 500 and 800 required for initial service, SpaceX CEO Elon Musk has said.

Email Tariq Malik at tmalik@space.com or follow him @tariqjmalik. Follow us @Spacedotcom, Facebook and Instagram.

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delays SpaceX

SpaceX delays launch of next 60 Starlink internet satellites to Thursday – Space.com

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launches 58 Starlink satellites and three Planet SkySats into orbit from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida on Aug. 18, 2src2src.

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launches 58 Starlink satellites and three Planet SkySats into orbit from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida on Aug. 18, 2020.

(Image: © SpaceX)

SpaceX has pushed the launch of its next big batch of Starlink internet satellites back two days, to Thursday (Sept. 3).

A Falcon 9 rocket had been scheduled to loft the 60 Starlink satellites on Tuesday morning (Sept. 1) from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. But those plans have changed, SpaceX representatives announced today (Aug. 31).

“Now targeting Thursday, September 3 at 8:46 a.m. EDT for launch of Starlink from Launch Complex 39A, pending Range acceptance — team is using additional time for data review,” SpaceX said via Twitter this afternoon. (“Range” refers to the Eastern Range, the U.S. Space Force entity that oversees launches from the East Coast.)

Now targeting Thursday, September 3 at 8:46 a.m. EDT for launch of Starlink from Launch Complex 39A, pending Range acceptance — team is using additional time for data reviewAugust 31, 2020

SpaceX will attempt to land the Falcon 9 first stage on a ship at sea during Thursday’s Starlink mission. You can watch all of Thursday’s action live here at Space.com, courtesy of SpaceX, or directly via the company.

SpaceX has already launched 600 Starlink satellites to low Earth orbit. But the constellation will get far bigger than that, if things go according to plan: SpaceX has approval to loft 12,000 Starlink spacecraft and has applied for permission to launch about 30,000 more on top of that.

The upcoming Starlink launch was originally targeted for Sunday (Aug. 30), but bad weather scuttled that attempt.

Mike Wall is the author of “Out There” (Grand Central Publishing, 2018; illustrated by Karl Tate), a book about the search for alien life. Follow him on Twitter @michaeldwall. Follow us on Twitter @Spacedotcom or Facebook. 

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delays rover

NASA delays Mars rover launch until at least July 30th – Engadget

This isn’t the first delay. NASA had pushed back the Mars 2020 takeoff from its original July 17th date to the 22nd after a problem with encapsulating the spacecraft.

While there’s only so much time left for the mission to start, the patience is easy to understand. NASA has been developing Perseverance and the Mars 2020 mission for years, and many pieces need to come together for the expedition to be a success. It’s an important mission, too, as it could shed light on the possibility of past life on Mars, the planet’s geological history and even the possibility of returning samples to Earth.

Due to processing delays in preparations to unite me with the rocket, my first launch attempt will be no earlier than July 30. @NASA and @ulalaunch are working to update the target launch date and have been able to expand the launch period until Aug. 15. https://t.co/cwfwy5cTY0 pic.twitter.com/XICMjwtx7h

— NASA’s Perseverance Mars Rover (@NASAPersevere) June 30, 2020

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SpaceX delays launch of Starlink and BlackSky satellites for more rocket checks – Space.com

A used SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket carrying three Canadian Radarsat satellites stands ready to launch from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California. The rocket's first stage will launch a new Starlink mission from Florida in June 2src2src.

A used SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket carrying three Canadian Radarsat satellites stands ready to launch from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California. The rocket’s first stage will launch a new Starlink mission from Florida in June 2020.

(Image: © SpaceX)

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — SpaceX is standing down from the launch of its next batch of Starlink satellites to allow time for additional preflight checks of the Falcon 9. 

The California-based spaceflight company was scheduled to launch another batch of its Starlink internet-beaming satellites and two satellites for BlackSky on a previously flown Falcon 9 rocket at 4:18 p.m. EST (2018 GMT) today from Pad 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. However, the company chose to delay the launch attempt, and a new date has not yet been set.

“Standing down from today’s Starlink mission; team needed additional time for pre-launch checkouts, but Falcon 9 and the satellites are healthy,” SpaceX tweeted on Friday afternoon. “Will announce new target launch date once confirmed on the Range.”  

The “Range” SpaceX mentions is the Eastern Range, which is part of the U.S. Space Force and is the entity that oversees the launches from Florida’s Space Coast.  This Starlink launch is one of two launches SpaceX has on the Range’s calendar for this week. 

Related: SpaceX’s Starlink satellite megaconstellation launches in photos

On June 30, a different Falcon 9 rocket will carry an upgraded GPS satellite into orbit for the U.S. Space Force. That launch is scheduled to fly from SpaceX’s other Florida launch site, Space Launch Complex 40. The global positioning satellite is part of an effort to upgrade the aging constellation currently in space. 

SpaceX has already postponed the GPS launch once this year, as the mission was originally scheduled to blast off in April. Concerns over the coronavirus coupled with the fact that the current GPS satellites were very healthy, meant that the launch could be moved back a bit. However, it does get priority over SpaceX’s own satellites, so there could be some shuffling in launch dates. 

The rocket featured in this mission will be the third first stage booster to fly five times. It previously launched SpaceX’s Demo-1 mission and three Earth-observing satellites for Canada in 2019, and two other Starlink missions this year. 

Standing down from today’s Starlink mission; team needed additional time for pre-launch checkouts, but Falcon 9 and the satellites are healthy. Will announce new target launch date once confirmed on the RangeJune 26, 2020

The company’s previous mission, which lofted 58 Starlinks and three small Earth-observing satellites for Planet, was the first mission SpaceX launched without conducting its traditional prelaunch static fire test. However, the company decided to carry out its traditional checkouts before the launch attempt for this next mission. 

On Wednesday (June 24), the booster’s nine engines were briefly fired as part of the routine static fire test. The test is designed to ensure that all the rocket’s systems are working properly prior to lift off.  

By all appearances, the test seemed to go smoothly and SpaceX announced it would attempt the launch today (June 26). But that changed just over two hours before liftoff, with the company ultimately standing down and opting to put the rocket through some more testing. 

Depending on what exactly prompted the delay, SpaceX could wait until after Tuesday’s launch to get the Starlink mission off the ground. Both drone ships have left Port Canaveral, so SpaceX is ready no matter which mission goes first. 

Editor’s note: This story has been updated with more details on SpaceX’s scrubbed Starlink launch.

Follow Amy Thompson on Twitter @astrogingersnap. Follow us on Twitter @Spacedotcom or Facebook.

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Disney delays reopening Disneyland and other California theme parks – MarketWatch

The Walt Disney Co.
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is delaying the reopening of its California theme parks, including Disneyland, which had been scheduled to start reopening July 17. “Given the time required for us to bring thousands of cast members back to work and restart our business, we have no choice but to delay the reopening of our theme parks and resort hotels until we receive approval from government officials,” Disney said in a statement late Wednesday. It did not give a new reopening date, but said the state of California does not plan to update its guidelines on theme parks until after July 4. “Once we have a clearer understanding of when guidelines will be released, we expect to be able to communicate a reopening date,” the company said. Disney still must negotiate with its unions before reopening, but union members have been critical of the company’s “rapid timetable” to reopen, especially considering the recent spike in coronavirus cases in Southern California.

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