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dozen Several

Several dozen virus cases occurred on USC’s fraternity row – KCRA Sacramento

>> WHERE THE NEWS COMES FIRST. THIS IS KCRA 3 NEWS AT 6:00. TONI: GOOD MORNING. I’M TONI VALLIERE. TE I AM TEO TORRES. DEIRDRE HAS THE DAY OFF. TY IS WORKING FROM HOME. WE START WITH THIS MORNING’S CORONAVIRUS HEADLINES. TONI: LAWMAKERS CONTINUE NEGOTIATING A NEW CORONAVIRUS RELIEF PACKAGE. IT COMES AS FEDERAL UNEMPLOYMENT AID EXPIRES TODAY. TEO: DOCTOR ANTHONY FAUCI RETURNS TO CAPITOL HILL TODAY. HE AND OTHER GOVERNMENT HEAL EXPERTS WILL TESTIFY BEFORE A SPECIAL HOUSE PANE INVESTIGATING THE PANDEMIC. VIETNAM IS REPORTING ITS FIRST COVID RELATED DEATH AFTER NOT HAVING ANY CASES FOR 99 CONSECUTIVE DAYS. TONI: TY STEELE JOINS US FROM HOME WITH IS WITH A LOOK AT THE LATEST CORONAVIRUS NUMBERS IN CALIFORNIA TY: THE STATE IS CLOSING IN ON HALF A MILLION CASES. IT IS EXPECTED TO HIT THAT NUMBER BY TOMORROW. THE STATE IS CLOSING IN ON HALF A MILLION CASE THIS IS ACCORDING TO JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY. MORE THAN NEW CASES WERE 8000 RECORDED IN THE LAST 24 HOURS. THE STATE NOW HAS NEARLY 493,000 CASES. THE DEATHS OF 118 CALIFORNIANS WERE REPORTED IN THE LAST DAY. JUST OVER PEOPLE IN THE STATE 9000 HAVE DIED OF VIRUS-RELATED COMPLICATIONS SINCE THE PANDEMIC BEGA LET’S LOOK AT THE TREND COVID-RELATED HOSPITALIZATIONS OVER THE PAST MONTH. HOSPITALIZATIONS FELL NEARLY 3% ON WEDNESDAY. THE STATE

Several dozen virus cases occurred on USC’s fraternity row

A coronavirus outbreak occurred this summer on a street near the University of Southern California where many fraternities are located, the Los Angeles Times reported.The university detected about 40 cases of people living on 28th Street who tested positive for COVID-19, said Dr. Sarah Van Orman, USC’s chief student health officer.Van Orman said a significant number were associated with four fraternity houses but it wasn’t clear that the infections involved fraternity members, who often lease out rooms during summer, the Times reported Thursday.The outbreak is now mostly over, with no new cases for the last week or so, Van Orman said.Overall, about 150 USC students and employees have tested positive for the virus. The university’s plans for the 2020-2021 academic year call for most students to learn online, but some will be on campus, with measures such as strict physical distancing in place. Housing will be limited to one student per bedroom in USC residence halls, suites, and apartments. Some rooms will remain vacant so that space will be available for students to quarantine if a surge of infections occurs during the semester.On Aug. 3, USC will have an external company begin a program of testing campus populations to identify, isolate, contact trace and contain new infections.

LOS ANGELES —

A coronavirus outbreak occurred this summer on a street near the University of Southern California where many fraternities are located, the Los Angeles Times reported.

The university detected about 40 cases of people living on 28th Street who tested positive for COVID-19, said Dr. Sarah Van Orman, USC’s chief student health officer.

Van Orman said a significant number were associated with four fraternity houses but it wasn’t clear that the infections involved fraternity members, who often lease out rooms during summer, the Times reported Thursday.

The outbreak is now mostly over, with no new cases for the last week or so, Van Orman said.

Overall, about 150 USC students and employees have tested positive for the virus.

The university’s plans for the 2020-2021 academic year call for most students to learn online, but some will be on campus, with measures such as strict physical distancing in place.

Housing will be limited to one student per bedroom in USC residence halls, suites, and apartments. Some rooms will remain vacant so that space will be available for students to quarantine if a surge of infections occurs during the semester.

On Aug. 3, USC will have an external company begin a program of testing campus populations to identify, isolate, contact trace and contain new infections.

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dozen lifeguards

More than two dozen lifeguards in New Jersey test positive for COVID-19, health officials say – NBC News

More than two dozen lifeguards on Long Beach Island tested positive for the coronavirus after attending social gatherings outside of work, healths officials said on Friday.

“The health department started receiving reports of COVID-19 activity among Surf City lifeguards on Saturday, July 18 and Harvey Cedars lifeguards on Sunday, July 19,” Daniel J. Krupinski, the Long Beach Island Health Department director, told Philadelphia public radio station WHYY.

Krupinski, who could not be immediately reached by NBC News for comment on Monday, said the lifeguards on the barrier island and popular summer destination are currently being isolated.

At least 12 of the positive cases stem from Surf City, NJ, and 17 from Harvey Cedars, according to WHYY and the Associated Press.

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“We have reason to believe the case activity stems from common social gatherings outside of work on July 12 and 14,” Krupinski said, emphasizing health officials do not think they contracted COVID-19 on the beach or at work.

Dr. Ed Lifshitz, director of the New Jersey Department of Health’s communicable disease service, said earlier in the month that he believes indoor parties on places like Long Beach Island are responsible for the cases, according to WHYY. The New Jersey Department of Health could not be immediately reached for comment on Monday.

“We certainly have evidence that indoor parties associated with beach towns and other places have occurred,” he said.

A representative for the Long Beach local government did not immediately return NBC News’ request for comment.

New Jersey was one of the first states to be hit hard by the coronavirus, and has recorded over 180,000 cases and 15,000 deaths.

In California, now the state with the most amount of cases, 11 lifeguards tested positive for COVID-19 in Newport Beach, according to NBC Los Angeles. The cases were confirmed on Sunday. Health officials believe the numbers happened through “community spread” and not on the job.

While it is not believed these lifeguards contracted the virus at work, the job has become more difficult during the pandemic. Lifeguards often must make direct contact with the people they are trying to save.

Tom Gill, a spokesman for the nonprofit United States Lifesaving Association, told NBC News in May that “at the end of the day, there are going to be times when you have to get really close, but there are lots of ways to minimize the impact.”

Image: Ben KesslenBen Kesslen

Ben Kesslen is a reporter for NBC News. 

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Android dozen

Here we go again – more than two dozen Android apps caught stealing your data – BGR

  • Sketchy Android apps that spy on users and steal data have been a nagging presence inside Google’s Play Store for a while now, despite the search giant’s best efforts to rid its app marketplace of bad actors.
  • It’s basically led to a giant game of whack-a-mole, with the latest apps to be clobbered by Google and pulled from the app store being a batch of 25 malicious apps discovered by a French cybersecurity firm.
  • The apps could have stolen users’ Facebook credentials, and they racked up more than 2 million downloads.

Consider this your umpteenth reminder that for as much as Google keeps improving or promising it’s improved the company’s proprietary app marketplace, sketchy app developers will never stop coming and never stop trying to sneak into the Google Play Store — past all the company’s defenses — to put its apps into the mix and awaiting your download. Which we saw yet another example of in recent days, with the revelation that Google has booted another batch of Android apps from the store, this time 25 apps caught in a position to steal users’ Facebook login data.

Evina, a French cybersecurity firm, disclosed this news in recent weeks, with its report that a single threat group developed the batch of apps that were made to look like everything from wallpaper and flashlight apps to mobile games. However, all the apps had the same goal, as Evina explains in its report of the fraud.

“When an application is launched on your phone, the malware queries the application name,” the company explains. “If it is a Facebook application, the malware will launch a browser that loads Facebook at the same time. The browser is displayed in the foreground which makes you think that the application launched it. When you enter your credentials into this browser, the malware executes javascript to retrieve them. The malware then sends your account information to a server.”

The apps included:

Image source: Evina

One thing to note is that when Google pulled the apps from the Play Store after Evina shared its findings, the search giant also disables the apps on the user’s end — in addition to notifying the user via the Play Store’s Play Protect service.

According to Evina, it informed Google about the apps in late May. Google investigated and took action in June, though some of the apps have been live in the Play Store since at least 2019. Cumulatively, according to the French firm, these apps garnered more than 2 million downloads.

There have been a smattering of instances like this one in recent months, such as the malware-laden group of two dozen apps (including calendar, weather, and camera functionality) that Google had to kick out of the Play Store back in February after they were found to request all sorts of potentially nefarious permissions (but not before racking up about 382 million downloads).

One of the apps, as we noted in an earlier post about this incident, was called Weather Forecast and was apparently “caught collecting user data and sending it to a server in China.”

Andy is a reporter in Memphis who also contributes to outlets like Fast Company and The Guardian. When he’s not writing about technology, he can be found hunched protectively over his burgeoning collection of vinyl, as well as nursing his Whovianism and bingeing on a variety of TV shows you probably don’t like.

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