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A ‘Black Moon’ and a meteor shower: There’s a lot happening in our sky tonight – PennLive

Black Moon

A ‘Black Moon’ is slated to take place at 1041 p.m. Tuesday night. Neil Blake | MLive.com

There’s a “Black Moon,” rising tonight according to Space.com.

Sounds sort of like a song title, doesn’t it?

It’s not, but it’s a pretty cool happening, even if you, likely, won’t be able to see it. At least, according to Space.com, you won’t be able to get a glance because it will be invisible to our eyes.

Don’t get too bummed, though, because there will still be reason to keep your eyes on the skies. According to Space.com, there will also be a meteor shower — called Kappa Cygnids — taking place, and there might be a chance to get an occasional look at one of those. And, if you do see one, the website says they are coming out of the constellation Draco.

Two-to-three meteors per hour are expected. Be patient.

So, what’s a “Black Moon?”

According to Space.com, the “Black Moon” is the name given to the third new moon in a season with four moons. So, this will be a new moon, and it’ll take place at 10:41 p.m. ET, according to the site.

A new moon occurs whenever the moon is directly between the sun and Earth. But, according to Space.com, the illuminated side of the moon faces away from Earth, making it “invisible to ground-based observers.”

So, although you might not be able to see all of the happenings up there, there’s plenty of reason to look up tonight.

You might see more than meteors, too. Don’t believe it? Well, check out this calculator which indicates that, not only are there alien civilizations out there, there’s plenty of them and running into one within 10 light years is a better bet than hitting the lottery.

Note to readers: if you purchase something through one of our affiliate links we may earn a commission.

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meteor Perseid

Perseid Meteor Shower 2020: Dates, best time to view and more – KABC-TV

One of the most popular meteor showers will soon unleash shooting stars across the night sky!

The Perseids peak on the night of Aug. 11-12, boasting up to 75 meteors per hour. Here’s what you need to know:


What are the Perseids?

The Perseids are dust and debris from the Comet Swift-Tuttle, AccuWeather explains.

“Perseids are not only numerous, they are beautiful. Most of the meteors leave a glittering trail as they pass,” AccuWeather Astronomy Blogger Dave Samuhel said. “They are multi-colored and many are bright.”

The meteor shower is widely considered the best of the year due to its high rates and pleasant late-summer temperatures, according to NASA.

When are the Perseids in 2020?

The Perseid Meteor Shower will peak overnight on Tuesday night.

The best time to view is between 11 p.m. Tuesday and 1 a.m. Wednesday. That’s the darkest time of the night before the moon rises.

For those with earlier bedtimes, a few shooting stars will be visible around 9 p.m. local time.


How do I watch the Perseids?

The Perseids can be seen with the naked eye. Meteors will be visible all over the sky, so don’t worry about looking in a specific direction, according to NASA.

If weather conditions are not favorable in your area, NASA will stream the shower on Facebook live from Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama.

Here are a few of AccuWeather’s tips for watching:

  • Check the latest forecast. If patchy clouds are expected, prepare to be patient and wait for breaks.

  • Find an area with low light pollution. If you live in a city, consider traveling to an area with less light.

  • Lie on your back and watch the whole sky.

  • Avoid looking at your phone and other light sources. Look for the darkest area of the sky. Keep the moon out of your line of sight as best you can.

Copyright © 2020 KABC-TV. All Rights Reserved.



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meteor Perseid

The 2020 Perseid meteor shower is peaking: How to watch the show – CNET

stojan-stojanovski-od-site-15657src83src3

Some 2019 Perseids, as seen from Macedonia.


Spaceweather.com/Stojan Stojanovski

It’s early August, which means the annual Perseid meteor shower is active, and it’s peaking now. The Perseids are one of the best, brightest batches of shooting stars, and it sure feels like we could use them now more than ever to add a little wonder and distraction into these pretty dismal times we’re living through.  

This famous shower comes around this time every year as the Earth drifts through a debris cloud left behind by the giant comet 109P/Swift-Tuttle. Bits of dust, pebbles and other cosmic detritus slam into our atmosphere, burning up into brief, bright streaks and even the occasional full-blown fireball streaking across the night sky. 

From the lab to your inbox. Get the latest science stories from CNET every week.

In 2020, the Perseids are expected to peak on Tuesday, Aug. 11 and Wednesday, Aug. 12, when the moon should be a little less than half full. 

The popularity of the shower is a combination of the fact that it’s one of the strongest, with up to 100 visible meteors per hour on average, and it’s coinciding with warm summer nights in the northern hemisphere. The waning moon is likely to wash out many otherwise visible meteors, but that still leaves plenty that should be easy to see if you do a little planning. 

See the Perseid meteor shower make a celestial scene worldwide


See all photos

In general, a good strategy is to head out to look for the Perseids as late in the evening as possible, but still before moonrise at your location. So in New York, for example, you’d want to be as far away from all that light pollution as possible by about 11 p.m. on Tuesday evening (the peak night) because the moon will rise about an hour later at 12:08 a.m. on Wednesday. (You can look up sunset and moonrise for your location with a site like TimeandDate.com.)

You can also try to block out the moon by situating yourself next to a building, tree or something else that keeps some of that moonlight out of your retinas. 

The moon will begin to totally disappear after mid-month, and although the Perseids will be past their prime, they will still be active and visible. This shower at half-peak with totally dark skies could be about the same as full peak with a bright moon, so don’t think you must go out on the peak night to catch it. 

Once you’ve decided on the perfect time and a place with minimal light interference and a wide view of the sky, just lie back, let your eyes adjust and relax. Pillows, blankets, lounge chairs and refreshments make for the ideal experience. It can take about 20 minutes for your eyes to adjust to the dark, so be sure to be patient. If you follow all my advice, you’re all but guaranteed to see a meteor. 

It doesn’t really matter where in the sky you look, so long as you have a broad view. That said, the Perseids will appear to radiate out from the constellation of Perseus, the Hero. If you want to practice to be an advanced meteor spotter, locate Perseus and try focusing there while you watch. Then try just looking up without focusing anywhere. See if you notice a difference. We’re still dealing with the unpredictability of nature, so results will vary. 

Arguably the best part of the Perseids each year are the gorgeous photos we get from talented astrophotographers spending long nights outside.

As always, if you capture any beauties yourself, please share them with me on Twitter or Instagram @EricCMack

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meteor Perseid

The 2020 Perseid meteor shower peaks Tuesday: How to watch the show – CNET

stojan-stojanovski-od-site-15657src83src3

Some 2019 Perseids, as seen from Macedonia.


Spaceweather.com/Stojan Stojanovski

It’s early August, which means the annual Perseid meteor shower is active, and it’s ready to peak this week. The Perseids are one of the best, brightest batches of shooting stars, and it feels like we could use them now more than ever to add a little wonder and distraction into these pretty dismal times. 

This famous shower comes around this time every year as the Earth drifts through a debris cloud left behind by the giant comet 109P/Swift-Tuttle. Bits of dust, pebbles and other cosmic detritus slam into our atmosphere, burning up into brief, bright streaks and even the occasional full-blown fireball streaking across the night sky. 

From the lab to your inbox. Get the latest science stories from CNET every week.

In 2020, the Perseids are expected to peak on Aug. 11 and 12, when the moon should be a little less than half full. 

The popularity of the shower is a combination of the fact that it’s one of the strongest, with up to 100 visible meteors per hour on average, and it’s coinciding with warm summer nights in the northern hemisphere. The waning moon is likely to wash out many otherwise visible meteors, but that still leaves plenty that should be easy to see if you do a little planning. 

See the Perseid meteor shower make a celestial scene worldwide


See all photos

In general, a good strategy is to head out to look for the Perseids as late in the evening as possible, but still before moonrise at your location. So in New York, for example, you’d want to be as far away from all that light pollution as possible by about 11 p.m. on Tuesday evening (the peak night) because the moon will rise about an hour later at 12:08 a.m. on Wednesday. (You can look up sunset and moonrise for your location with a site like TimeandDate.com.)

You can also try to block out the moon by situating yourself next to a building, tree or something else that keeps some of that moonlight out of your retinas. 

The moon will begin to totally disappear after mid-month, and although the Perseids will be past their prime, they will still be active and visible. This shower at half-peak with totally dark skies could be about the same as full peak with a bright moon, so don’t think you must go out on the peak night to catch it. 

Once you’ve decided on the perfect time and a place with minimal light interference and a wide view of the sky, just lie back, let your eyes adjust and relax. Pillows, blankets, lounge chairs and refreshments make for the ideal experience. It can take about 20 minutes for your eyes to adjust to the dark, so be sure to be patient. If you follow all my advice, you’re all but guaranteed to see a meteor. 

It doesn’t really matter where in the sky you look, so long as you have a broad view. That said, the Perseids will appear to radiate out from the constellation of Perseus, the Hero. If you want to practice to be an advanced meteor spotter, locate Perseus and try focusing there while you watch. Then try just looking up without focusing anywhere. See if you notice a difference. We’re still dealing with the unpredictability of nature, so results will vary. 

Arguably the best part of the Perseids each year are the gorgeous photos we get from talented astrophotographers spending long nights outside.

As always, if you capture any beauties yourself, please share them with me on Twitter or Instagram @EricCMack

Read More

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meteor Perseid

Perseid meteor shower 2020: When and where to see the best fireballs in the sky this summer – NJ.com

Meteor showers for NJ.com

Don’t forget to look up. The best meteor shower of the year is coming soon as the Perseids zip across the sky.Photo illustration by Yuri B. | Pixabay

Ready to see some fireballs in the sky? It’s almost time for the Perseid meteor shower to reach its peak, putting on what is typically the best meteor shower of the year.

Just one word of caution to skywatchers: The August moon will be slightly past its last quarter phase just when the Perseid meteor shower will be peaking. As a result, the moonlight will make it tougher to see all those shooting stars — as many as 60 per hour.

However, the view should be better than last year, when the moon was very close to its full phase. Experts say you can still catch a decent amount of shooting stars — and even some brighter fireballs — if you find a dark location and look up during the late-night and early-morning hours.

Even though the 2020 Perseid meteor shower will be at its best on Tuesday, Aug. 11 and Wednesday, Aug. 12, it is already producing enough meteors to make it worthwhile to do some early stargazing.

Perseid meteor shower

Tame-lapse image of the Perseid meteor shower.

When to look for the Perseids

Experts from EarthSky.org say the view may still be pretty good as late as Wednesday morning, late Wednesday night and early Thursday morning, as long as the sky is clear.

It will still be possible to see some Perseids for 10 days or so after the peak. While it’ll be at reduced numbers, there will be less moonlight to light up the sky, with the moon waning each night up until Aug. 17, when there will be moon-free skies all night long.

Meteor Showers

The Perseid meteor shower at Little Sable Point Lighthouse at Golden Township, just south of Silver Lake State Park in the early morning of Thursday, August 13, 2015. MLive.com

Where to see the Perseid meteor shower

You can see the Perseid’s meteors from almost anywhere, but experts say you increase your chances if you go to a park or open area in a rural place, as far away as possible from bright city lights and street lights.

Good timing also helps.

“The best time to see any meteor shower is after midnight,” Amie Gallagher, director of the planetarium at Raritan Valley Community College in Somerset County, told us prior to the Perseid meteor shower in 2018. “That’s when the part of the Earth that you are on is moving into the stream of meteors.”

Experts at NASA also say it’s best to wait until after midnight to look for the Perseid meteors — preferably during the pre-dawn hours — although some meteors could be visible as early as 10 p.m.

In case you are wondering, you don’t need a telescope or binoculars — just your eyes.

Meteor Showers

Meteors from the Perseid meteor shower were seen during a previous summer just after the moon set but before the sun rose in Colorado.OS- Jimmy Westlake

What are the Perseid meteors?

Although they appear big from Earth, the Perseid meteors are actually tiny pieces of debris from the tail of the Comet Swift-Tuttle. The comet zips around the sun and leaves a trail of debris, and every August our planet moves through the debris.

Skywatchers on Earth can see some of the debris, which looks like shooting stars. Because the Earth rotates, the bulk of our planet misses most of the comet debris before midnight.

That’s why the best time to view the Perseid meteor shower is after midnight, any time until dawn. Those hours are ideal for seeing the most shooting stars, and maybe even some larger and brighter meteors, known as fireballs.

Thank you for relying on us to provide the journalism you can trust. Please consider supporting NJ.com with a voluntary subscription.

Evan Slavit may be reached at eslavit@njadvancemedia.com. Len Melisurgo may be reached at LMelisurgo@njadvancemedia.com.

Note to readers: if you purchase something through one of our affiliate links we may earn a commission.

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meteor Perseid

The 2020 Perseid meteor shower peaks soon: How to watch the show – CNET

stojan-stojanovski-od-site-15657src83src3

Some 2019 Perseids, as seen from Macedonia.


Spaceweather.com/Stojan Stojanovski

It’s early August, which means the annual Perseid meteor shower is active and about ready to peak. The Perseids are one of the best, brightest batches of shooting stars, and it feels like we could use them now more than ever to add a little wonder and distraction into these pretty dismal times. 

This famous shower comes around this time every year as the Earth drifts through a debris cloud left behind by the giant comet 109P/Swift-Tuttle. Bits of dust, pebbles and other cosmic detritus slam into our atmosphere, burning up into brief, bright streaks and even the occasional full-blown fireball streaking across the night sky. 

From the lab to your inbox. Get the latest science stories from CNET every week.

In 2020, the Perseids are expected to peak on Aug. 11 and 12, when the moon should be a little less than half full. 

The popularity of the shower is a combination of the fact that it’s one of the strongest, with up to 100 visible meteors per hour on average, and it’s coinciding with warm summer nights in the northern hemisphere. The waning moon is likely to wash out many otherwise visible meteors, but that still leaves plenty that should be easy to see if you do a little planning. 

See the Perseid meteor shower make a celestial scene worldwide


See all photos

In general, a good strategy is to head out to look for the Perseids as late in the evening as possible, but still before moonrise at your location. So in New York, for example, you’d want to be as far away from all that light pollution as possible by about 11 p.m. on Tuesday evening (the peak night) because the moon will rise about an hour later at 12:08 a.m. on Wednesday. (You can look up sunset and moonrise for your location with a site like TimeandDate.com.)

You can also try to block out the moon by situating yourself next to a building, tree or something else that keeps some of that moonlight out of your retinas. 

The moon will begin to totally disappear after mid-month, and although the Perseids will be past their prime, they will still be active and visible. This shower at half-peak with totally dark skies could be about the same as full peak with a bright moon, so don’t think you must go out on the peak night to catch it. 

Once you’ve decided on the perfect time and a place with minimal light interference and a wide view of the sky, just lie back, let your eyes adjust and relax. Pillows, blankets, lounge chairs and refreshments make for the ideal experience. It can take about 20 minutes for your eyes to adjust to the dark, so be sure to be patient. If you follow all my advice, you’re all but guaranteed to see a meteor. 

It doesn’t really matter where in the sky you look, so long as you have a broad view. That said, the Perseids will appear to radiate out from the constellation of Perseus, the Hero. If you want to practice to be an advanced meteor spotter, locate Perseus and try focusing there while you watch. Then try just looking up without focusing anywhere. See if you notice a difference. We’re still dealing with the unpredictability of nature, so results will vary. 

Arguably the best part of the Perseids each year are the gorgeous photos we get from talented astrophotographers spending long nights outside.

As always, if you capture any beauties yourself, please share them with me on Twitter or Instagram @EricCMack

Read More

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meteor Perseid

How to see the 2020 Perseid meteor shower, one of the best of the year – CNET

stojan-stojanovski-od-site-15657src83src3

Some 2019 Perseids, as seen from Macedonia.


Spaceweather.com/Stojan Stojanovski

It’s early August, and that means the Perseid meteor shower is active and about ready to peak. The Perseids are one of the best, brightest batches of shooting stars, and it feels like we could use them now more than ever to add a little wonder and distraction into some pretty dismal times. 

From the lab to your inbox. Get the latest science stories from CNET every week.

This famous shower comes around this time every year as the Earth drifts through a debris cloud left behind by the giant comet 109P/Swift-Tuttle. Bits of dust, pebbles and other cosmic detritus slam into our atmosphere, burning up into brief, bright streaks and even the occasional full-blown fireball streaking across the night sky. 

See the Perseid meteor shower make a celestial scene worldwide


See all photos

In 2020, the Perseids are expected to peak on Aug. 11 and 12, when the moon should be a little less than half full. 

The popularity of the shower is a combination of the fact that it’s one of the strongest, with up to 100 visible meteors per hour on average, and it’s coinciding with warm summer nights in the northern hemisphere. The waning moon is likely to wash out many otherwise visible meteors, but that still leaves plenty that should be easy to see if you do a little planning. 

In general, a good strategy is to head out to look for the Perseids as late in the evening as possible, but still before moonrise at your location. So in New York, for example, you’d want to be as far away from all that light pollution as possible by about 11 p.m. on Tuesday evening (the peak night) because the moon will rise about an hour later at 12:08 a.m. on Wednesday. (You can look up sunset and moonrise for your location with a site like TimeandDate.com.)

You can also try to block out the moon by situating yourself next to a building, tree or something else that keeps some of that moonlight out of your retinas. 

The moon will begin to totally disappear after mid-month, and although the Perseids will be past their prime, they will still be active and visible. This shower at half-peak with totally dark skies could be about the same as full peak with a bright moon, so don’t think you must go out on the peak night to catch it. 

Once you’ve decided on the perfect time and a place with minimal light interference and a wide view of the sky, just lie back, let your eyes adjust and relax. Pillows, blankets, lounge chairs and refreshments make for the ideal experience. It can take about 20 minutes for your eyes to adjust to the dark, so be sure to be patient. If you follow all my advice, you’re all but guaranteed to see a meteor. 

It doesn’t really matter where in the sky you look, so long as you have a broad view. That said, the Perseids will appear to radiate out from the constellation of Perseus, the Hero. If you want to practice to be an advanced meteor spotter, locate Perseus and try focusing there while you watch. Then try just looking up without focusing anywhere. See if you notice a difference. We’re still dealing with the unpredictability of nature, so results will vary. 

Arguably the best part of the Perseids each year are the gorgeous photos we get from talented astrophotographers spending long nights outside.

As always, if you capture any beauties yourself, please share them with me on Twitter or Instagram @EricCMack

Read More

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meteor Perseid

Perseid Meteor Shower peaks this week. Here are some tips and tricks – The Cincinnati Enquirer

Dean Regas, Special to Cincinnati Enquirer
Published 9:37 p.m. ET Aug. 3, 2020

CLOSE

Clear summer nights are perfect for sitting back in a lawn chair and watching the stars up above. Chances are, if you stay out long enough, you will also see a meteor streak across the sky. Also called shooting stars, these fast, fleeting fiery visitors to Earth’s upper atmosphere can spark wonder in any stargazer and evoke an “Ooh” and “Aah!”

The popular Perseid Meteor Shower peaks this week. But before you get too excited, a warning: meteor showers are notoriously fickle events. Even astronomers can’t predict what kind of light-show you will see. But here are some tips and tricks to seeing the most meteors and having a guaranteed good time under the stars.

Shooting stars each year

The Perseids are tiny specks of ice and dust that come from the tail of a comet: Comet Swift-Tuttle. Every year, Earth slams into this cosmic debris to create these shooting stars. The Perseids get their name from the constellation Perseus from which the meteors seem to radiate. But the shooting stars do not come from the stars that are trillions of miles away – they merely burn up in Earth’s atmosphere 40-50 miles overhead.

To see the most meteors, get out in the country. If you are away from city lights you will see more of the fainter meteor streaks. The best time to view is 11 p.m.-2 a.m. on August 11-12. However, you can see a stray shooting star earlier in the evening as well as a few days on either side of the peak.

Naked eye event

You do not need telescopes or binoculars to observe a meteor shower. You want to take in as much of the sky as possible, and viewing meteors with the naked eye is a must.  On August 11, face northeast between 10 p.m.-1 a.m. and scan the sky. The meteors will tend to fly from the constellation Perseus (which you can identify using phone apps), but could come from anywhere.

While you are waiting, make sure to check out the planets Jupiter and Saturn, which are lighting up the southern sky. Then the third quarter Moon will rise after 1 a.m. and look dramatic on the horizon. But the higher it gets in the sky, the more moonlight will wash out the meteors.

My final advice is to lower your expectations. Don’t expect to see a laser light show or the sky falling. Be skeptical of any news story that promises you will see “80-100 meteors per hour.” If it is a clear night, and you’re away from city lights, you may see about 10-30 meteors per hour.     

Watching for meteors is not an action packed adventure. But it is a chance to slow down, stay up late, and drink in the night sky with friends and family. And even if you see only a few meteors, it can be one of the best nights you can spend under the stars.

Dean Regas is the Astronomer at the Cincinnati Observatory, and author of the book 100 Things to See in the Night Sky, Expanded Edition. He can be reached at dean@cincinnatiobservatory.org

Space debris quick guide

Comet – an icy body which produces a tail when close to the Sun

Asteroid – a rocky or metallic body out in space and orbiting the Sun

Meteoroid – a small asteroid

Meteor – an object falling through the Earth’s atmosphere aka a “shooting star”

Meteorite – an object from space that lands on the Earth 

Event: Meteor Showers Online Class

What: Astronomer Dean Regas leads this online class to explore shooting stars. Plus he’ll share tips on viewing the Perseid Meteor Shower.  Great for all ages.

When: Monday, Aug. 10, 7 p.m.

Where: Online Class

Cost: $10 per household

Registration:  cincinnatiobservatory.org/events

Read or Share this story: https://www.cincinnati.com/story/entertainment/2020/08/03/tips-watching-perseid-meteor-shower-cincinnati/5557152002/

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double meteor

How to see the double meteor shower Tuesday in St. Louis – KSDK.com

ST. LOUIS — Get ready for a spectacular show across our night sky Tuesday night into early Wednesday morning.

The southern Delta Aquarids and Alpha Capricornids, two minor meteor showers, will come together to produce upwards of 15-20 meteors per hour for one night only.

To see this meteor shower, look up Tuesday night around midnight. The best viewing will be around and just after 1 a.m. Wednesday.

Mostly clear skies are expected Tuesday into Wednesday in the St. Louis area so expect to view this celestial event with ease; no binoculars or telescopes needed!

The next meteor shower is in just a couple of weeks, the Perseid meteor shower will return Aug. 11.

More weather headlines: 

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Aquariid meteor

Eta Aquariid meteor shower: When and how to watch – KSAT San Antonio

Stargazers also have a chance to view the shower in the early morning hours before dawn on Sunday

HGRH4K An Eta Aquarid meteor exploding over pine trees on the Coconino Rim along the Arizona Trail. Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
HGRH4K An Eta Aquarid meteor exploding over pine trees on the Coconino Rim along the Arizona Trail. Kaibab National Forest, Arizona (Credit: Mike Cavaroc / Alamy Stock Photo)

The Eta Aquariid meteor shower is expected to peak on Tuesday, but a nearly full moon could outshine the show. Stargazers also have a chance to view the shower in the early morning hours before dawn on Sunday.

May is the best spring month to view meteor activity for those in the northern hemisphere, according to the American Meteor Society.

However, this meteor shower favors sky watchers in the southern hemisphere, where between 20 and 40 meteors can be seen each hour. In the northern hemisphere, observers can expect to see between 10 and 30 meteors in the hours before dawn.

The meteor shower is expected to peak on the mornings of May 5 and 6, but it coincides with the coming full moon, which is also a supermoon, on May 7.

However, the waxing gibbous moon is expected to set during the early morning hours this weekend, providing a better opportunity to see the meteor shower on Sunday morning.

You can use TimeandDate.com to check when moonset occurs in your area. The amount of visible meteors will also be affected by weather conditions where you live.

The source of the Eta Aquariid meteor shower is Halley’s Comet. Earth crosses the comet’s orbital path each spring between April and May. This happens again in October, which creates the Orionid meteor shower.

The meteors will be streaking across our sky at 151,200 miles per hour, and about half of them will leave persistent trains, which are glowing trails of energetic gas that remain for a few seconds after the passing of the meteor, according to EarthSky.

They appear to be coming from the northeastern part of the Aquarius constellation, which contributes to the name of the shower.

If you live in an urban area, you may want to drive to a place that isn’t littered with city lights that will obstruct your view.

Find an open area with a wide view of the sky. Make sure you have a chair or blanket so you can look straight up. And give your eyes about 20 to 30 minutes to adjust to the darkness — without looking at your phone — so meteors are easier to spot.

Copyright 2020 by KSAT – All rights reserved.


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