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chief Oregon

Oregon fire chief and crew lose homes, station as they battle Holiday Farm Fire – NBC News

A rural fire chief and several of her volunteer firefighters in Oregon lost their homes and station house to the Holiday Farm Fire as they battled the blaze for the last few days.

Upper McKenzie Rural Fire Chief Christiana Rainbow Plews is among thousands of first responders who have been combating the fires which have ravaged the West Coast for weeks. She received a call Monday night about a downed power line and the resulting brush fire spread faster than anything she had ever seen.

Vehicles burned by the Holiday Farm Fire outside a shop in Nimrod, Ore., on Sept. 10, 2020.Andy Nelson / USA Today Network

Within an hour or two of leaving her home to respond, Plews said, she had issued a level 3 evacuation order – for residents to leave immediately – for the McKenzie River area in Lane County. Her own family left their home about 20 miles downriver from the fire’s origins, able to bring a few of the animals on their property.

The next evening, a neighboring fire chief told Plews that crews had done everything they could, but her home was gone.

“I not only have my life to put back together, I also have a fire department to put back together,” Plews said. “And I honestly don’t know how I’m going to do that.”

Plews said she was awake for about 56 hours, with many of her crew members going even longer. The team battled the flames from Monday night until Thursday or Friday, returned Saturday, and the majority were given a 24-hour rest period by Sunday, Plews said.

“I am all up and down and inside out,” Plews told NBC News on Sunday. “At this point in time, I’m tired and it’s really minute to minute. I’m really good one minute and hopeful, and then the next minute I just can’t do it. I’m lost.”

Career firefighters from the Eugene-Springfield area were able to offer mutual aid, a blessing, Plews said, with so many of the state’s resources drained by the dozens of fires hitting Oregon. The fight against the Holiday Farm Fire is still in its early days, but Plews expects the struggle to stretch out for quite some time. Most of the area’s residents have been displaced and are eager to return home, she said.

Plews expects that people might be angry, but with active fires on both sides of the road and unstable timber all around, it’s unclear when anyone will be able to return to see what’s left of their lives.

“We cannot afford to have people go back to the homes that are there and then have to respond to that,” Plews said. “We literally don’t have the people to respond to that.”

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The fire department’s Blue River station is destroyed, equipment burned, and a number of the crew members have lost their homes and livelihoods in the past week. Almost all of them have been able to reunite with their loved ones in safe locations, though a few have stayed at the department’s surviving station to keep fighting.

Except for Plews, every firefighter on the team is a volunteer who adds the dangerous work to an already bustling life. Samantha Winningham, a lieutenant with the Upper Mckenzie crew, is one of those volunteers.

Winningham helps run her family’s business, Meyer’s General Store, in Blue River, where she has lived her entire life and where she and her husband are raising a 4-year-old daughter. Their home was just a block away from her mother in one direction. A few blocks in another direction, her aunt lived next to the store

Now all those homes are gone, along with the garden she’d been working on in her spare time and the album she kept on the bottom of a bookshelf with her grandparents’ photographs.

“Literally the whole town of Blue River is totally leveled, so three of our houses and our business, the fire station, the post office, the local clinic,” Winningham said. “And we’re in a really small community, so a lot of our close family friends [lost their homes] too. It’s all gone.”

The family of about 16 are currently together in a hotel in Eugene, where nearly the entire town of Blue River is also staying.

Winningham’s husband was pulling dinner out of the oven just as the calls came in about downed power lines Monday night. She left her home that night and hasn’t been able to return since.

She and the rest of the crew went door-to-door to evacuate families, dealing with heavy winds that sent embers that forced them to hide behind their equipment. All the while there was barely any cell reception, making it difficult to even know how their loved ones were doing.

Winningham left the fight on Wednesday to reunite with her family after she said she realized she was no longer able to work effectively with the worry for her loved ones on her mind.

“I was fighting a battle that I wasn’t winning, everything was just getting worse, and I wasn’t at home able to help my family be safe either,” Winningham said.

In the days she’s been able to spend with her family, and almost everyone in their small town who has been displaced, Winningham said she’s been able to find some hope that Blue River will rebuild better than it was before.

“Everyone in our town made it out and alive and safe,” Winningham said. “As helpless as we feel as a department, we might not have been able to save the structures but we were able to save the people. So at least we have that.”

At least two GoFundMes were created to raise funds for the chief on Friday, collectively gathering more than $40,000 for Plews and the department.

Lindsie Cline, right, hugs her sister-in-law Brittany Cline at an evacuation center in Springfield, Ore., on Sept. 10, 2020, after their families fled the Holiday Farm Fire.Rob Schumacher / USA Today Network

“Rainbow made the call to raise the evacuation level early so that the citizens in her jurisdiction had time to get out safely,” one of the fundraising organizers, Wren Arrington, said in the GoFundMe description. “Rainbow is a full blown, grass roots, salt-of-the-earth hero.”

Donations are also coming in for the displaced Lane County residents, people who need clothes and toiletries, Plews said. Though there have been some difficulties in getting everyone what they need in the turmoil of the last several days, Plews said, the community response has been overwhelming.

“I know how these long term events and there’s that period in the beginning where everyone is there for everyone else, piles of donations, and there’s a lot of fear and uncertainty but also a lot of hope,” Plews said.

At least two GoFundMe campaigns were created on Friday, together gathering more than $40,000 for Plews.

“Rainbow made the call to raise the evacuation level early so that the citizens in her jurisdiction had time to get out safely,” one of the organizers, Wren Arrington, said in his fundraiser description. “Rainbow is a full blown, grass roots, salt-of-the-earth hero.”

The Holiday Farm Fire was only five percent contained on Sunday and had scorched 161,872 acres, according to the National Wildfire Coordinating Group’s incident information system.

Andrew Phelps, Oregon’s emergency management director, said in an interview with MSNBC that the state was preparing for a “mass mass fatality incident.”

“There are going to be a number of fatalities, folks who just couldn’t get warning in time and evacuate their homes and get to safety,” Phelps said Friday.

At least 33 people have died in the dozens of fires along the West Coast, with dozens more missing and thousands of others displaced. Oregon’s state data showed Sunday that 35 fires have devastated 902,620 acres.

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Oregon PICTURED

PICTURED: Boy, 13, who died in Oregon wildfire huddling in car with his dog to try to escape flames – Daily Mail

A husband desperately searching for his family in an Oregon wildfire has told how he was unable to recognize his wife because she was so badly burned, as it’s revealed their 13-year-old son died while clutching his pet dog.   

Chris Tofte spoke of the heartbreaking moment his wife Angela, who is now in a critical condition in hospital, told him ‘I am your wife’ as he helped her into his car and told her he was searching for his missing wife, son and mother-in-law in the Santiam Fire in Marion County Tuesday.  

The couple’s son Wyatt Tofte, 13, died Tuesday in the blaze after huddling in a car with his pet dog to try to escape the roaring flames. 

The boy’s 71-year-old grandmother Peggy Mosso was also killed as Angela tried in vain to free her from a burning vehicle.    

At least 29 people have been killed in the devastating wildfires that continue to ravage the West Coast with Oregon officials bracing for a ‘mass fatality event’ after 10 percent of the population has been forced to flee their homes and two large blazes threaten to merge around the most populated part of the state.

Chris Tofte (pictured as the search continued for his son Wyatt Wednesday) spoke of the heartbreaking moment he was unable to recognize his wife because she was so badly burned, as it’s revealed their 13-year-old son died while clutching his pet dog

Wyatt Tofte (pictured) was killed in an Oregon wildfire this week after huddling in a car with his dog to try to escape the flames

Wyatt (pictured in an undated image) died Tuesday in the Santiam Fire in Marion County, along with his 71-year-old grandmother, Peggy Mosso (center). Wyatt’s mom Angela Tofte (left) is in critical condition with full body burns

New details have emerged of Wyatt’s and Mosso’s horrifying final moments and the desperate rescue efforts of the Toftes to try to find their loved ones alive as the flames ripped through the neighborhood where they lived. 

Bereaved mom Angela was so badly burned that her husband Chris didn’t recognize her when he passed her during his frantic search to locate his missing son, wife and mother-in-law.  

Chris told the Statesman Journal he was driving into the wildfires looking for his family around 4am Tuesday when he spotted Angela on the road.  

She was wearing underwear, her bare feet were severely burned and her hair and mouth were black, he told the outlet.

He stopped to help her into his car but her injuries had left her unrecognizable from her usual self and he did not realize she was his wife, he said. 

When he told her he needed to find his wife and son, she replied: ‘I am your wife.’  

Angela and Chris both survived but Wyatt and Mosso were consumed by the blaze and their bodies discovered by rescue teams later this week. 

Their devastated family broke their silence to tell how the teenager’s parents desperately searched for their son as the flames ripped through the neighborhood where they lived. Pictured Peggy Mosso (left) and Wyatt Tofte (right)

Mosso (left) and Wyatt (center). The family spokesperson said they believe Wyatt ran and clambered inside the vehicle with his dog to try to escape the roaring flames. Mosso was found dead in a separate car that became engulfed in flames as Angela – Mosso’s daughter – desperately tried to save her from the fireball, herself sustaining full body burns

Chris Tofte hugs a friend as they search for his son Wyatt Wednesday who was not seen since the blaze ripped through the area Tuesday

Chris leads a search Wednesday for his son who was missing at the time. His body was later discovered by search teams

Chris spoke of the heartbreaking moment Angela told him ‘I am your wife’ as he helped her and told her he was searching for his missing family

The dad is seen on the phone after receiving news of Wyatt’s death on Wednesday in Lyons, Oregon

The devastated family told CNN the body of ‘kind-hearted’ Wyatt was found in a car with his pet dog Duke on his lap.  

‘After a long search for Wyatt, he was found in a car with his dog on his lap, but unfortunately, was not able to escape the fire,’ a family statement said.

The family spokesperson said they believe Wyatt ran and clambered inside the vehicle with his dog to try to escape the roaring flames.

The boy’s grandmother was found dead in a separate car that became engulfed in flames as Angela – Mosso’s daughter – desperately tried to save her from the fireball, herself sustaining full body burns.

The family paid tribute to Wyatt and Mosso and thanked emergency crews for helping in the search. 

‘Our family is devastated by the loss of our kind-hearted 13-year-old Wyatt and his beloved grandmother Peggy in the Santiam Fire in the early morning of September 8th,’ the family statement to CNN said. 

‘Wyatt, just the sweetest little boy; loved to fish, played video games, like a lot of kids, just a very sweet polite, boy. 

‘We want to thank all emergency personnel and people who helped in the search. Our family appreciates the love and support we have received from everyone during this terrible tragedy.’ 

Oregon firefighters work behind caution tape in Mill City, Oregon, on Thursday as they continue to battle the Santiam Fire

Firefighters douse embers of the Santiam Fire in Mill City Thursday. At least 29 people have been killed in the devastating wildfires that continue to ravage the West Coast

A charred swing set and car are seen after the passage of the Santiam Fire in Gates, Oregon, Thursday. Oregon officials are bracing for a ‘mass fatality event’

The charred remains of the Gates Elementary School, which was being used as a staging ground by firefighters, after the Santiam Fire ripped through it 

At least eight people have been reported dead in the Oregon wildfires although authorities are yet to confirm official figures and dozens are unaccounted for.

Marion County officials said Friday evening that rescue crews had found two more victims of the Beachie Creek fire near Salem.  

Another victim’s body was found in a home near Goodpasture Road in Vida after the Holiday Farm Fire ripped through the area.  

Fears are mounting that the death toll could climb much higher as Oregon’s emergency management director, Andrew Phelps, warned officials are ‘preparing for a mass fatality event’.

‘We know we’re dealing with fire-related deaths and we’re preparing for a mass fatality event based on what we know and the number of structures lost,’ he said.

More than one million acres and thousands of structures have been destroyed by the dozens of blazes across the state sending 10 percent of residents fleeing their homes in their masses. 

The Bobcat Fire burns down trees in the Angeles National Forest on Friday in Monrovia, California

Volunteer Elizabeth Stoltz of Heisson waters the Fort Vancouver Garden in Vancouver, Washington, on Friday

Oregon Gov. Brown said 500,000 Oregonians were in some sort of evacuation zone Friday – a slight dialing back on a statement late Thursday issued by the state Office of Emergency Management that said a half-million people had been ordered to evacuate statewide.

Dozens of people are missing in Jackson County in the south and Marion County, where a fire continues to burn east of Salem, Brown told a news conference Friday. 

Hundreds of firefighters battled two large wildfires Friday that threatened to merge near the most populated part of the state, including the suburbs of Portland, causing the city to declare a state of emergency Thursday. 

National Guard troops and corrections officers transferred about 1,300 inmates from a women’s prison in a southern suburb of Portland ‘out of an abundance of caution,’ the Oregon Department of Corrections said.

Spokeswoman Vanessa Vanderzee said it took 20 hours to transfer the inmates Thursday to another prison in a safe zone.

In California at least 20 have died and there has been at least one death reported in Washington state.  

Four people have been arrested for arson for deliberately starting blazes along the West Coast while the states are already grappling with dozens of deadly blazes. 

Michael Jarrod Bakkela, 41, was arrested Friday and charged with arson, for allegedly setting a fire in southern Oregon earlier this week, while the area was already grappling with the deadly Almeda Fire. Anita Esquivel was arrested and booked into Monterey County Jail on arson charges for starting fires in California

Two men in Washington state, one man in Oregon and one woman in California are facing arson charges, authorities said.    

Michael Jarrod Bakkela, 41, was arrested Friday and charged with two counts of arson, 15 counts of criminal mischief and 14 counts of reckless endangering for allegedly setting a fire in southern Oregon earlier this week, while the area was already grappling with the deadly Almeda Fire. 

The blaze grew to merge with the Almeda – which started about six hours earlier – and has now killed at least two people. 

Bakkela was allegedly spotted setting a fire behind a home in Phoenix around 5 p.m. Tuesday, causing the residents to flee.

The Jackson County Sheriff’s Office said deputies arrived on the scene to find Bakkela ‘standing close to a very large fire threatening several homes.’  

Authorities said the fire started by Bakkela caused ‘significant damage’ and destroyed ‘numerous homes’.

Bakkela was arrested Tuesday for a probation violation on a charge of unlawful possession of methamphetamine and was later charged Friday in connection with the Almeda Fire. 

He is booked at the Jackson County Jail and is expected to be arraigned Monday.  

In California, a 37-year-old woman was also arrested Friday accused of intentionally starting an unknown number of fires on Highway 101 near Boronda Road around 9am Friday morning.  

Shawn Thompson hugs Melissa Vuckovich after an unsuccessful search for their missing cat, at the location of where their home once stood in Ashland Oregon

Firefighters work on a smoldering fire in a burned neighborhood in Talent, Oregon. Four people have been arrested for arson for deliberately starting blazes along the West Coast

Talent Oregon on Friday. Two men in Washington state, one man in Oregon and one woman in California are facing arson charges for setting fires in areas that were already grappling with deadly blazes

Anita Esquivel was arrested and booked into Monterey County Jail on arson charges. 

The Monterey County District Attorney’s Office later dismissed rumors that she had ties to extreme left-wing activist group Antifa. 

The Office told KION there was no information or evidence suggesting she was connected to the group. 

Two other men were arrested for starting blazes in Washington state this week, authorities confirmed.

A 36-year-old Puyallup resident was arrested Wednesday for allegedly starting a fire on State Route 167 at Meridian.

The next day another unidentified man was detained following a short cop chase on foot over a blaze the man allegedly started at State Route 512 and State Route 7.

This comes as Oregon authorities said Thursday they are investigating whether the cause of the Almeda Fire that has killed two was an arson attack after a body was discovered near the start of the blaze.

Ashland Police Chief Tighe O’Meara announced Thursday a criminal investigation had been opened into the cause of the fire saying he believes the circumstances around it are ‘suspicious’.

Investigators are looking into the possible connection between the blaze and the death of an unidentified individual, whose body was found near the origin of the fire. 

The National Weather Service (NWS) revealed a staggering 87 percent of all wildfires that have ravaged America this year were caused by humans. 

A camp crew truck was destroyed on Stringtown Road in a Thursday evening flare-up in Oroville, California, which burned over the truck in the Bear Fire

Boaters pass by the Seattle skyline during hazy air conditions on Friday morning as smoke pollution from wildfires raging in California and across the Pacific Northwest worsened in San Francisco, Seattle, and Portland, Oregon

Farm equipment is seen through heavy smoke on Friday in Molalla, Oregon. Multiple wildfires grew by hundreds of thousands of acres this week, prompting large-scale evacuations throughout the state

With the prevalence of human-caused fires and the current unrest the nation is grappling with, state and national authorities have been forced to deny unsubstantiated rumors that have surfaced online that wildfires have been intentionally set by extreme right-wing or extreme left-wing groups. 

The FBI said Friday that it’s investigated several claims and found them to be untrue, while officials in Oregon and Washington state have turned to Facebook to knock down the competing narratives – some posts blamed far-left antifa activists and others claimed the far-right group the Proud Boys was responsible for the fires scorching wide swaths of the region.  

California Governor Gavin Newsom said Friday that the blazes were proof of the perils of climate change, denouncing the ‘ideological BS’ of those who deny the danger and vowing Friday to accelerate the state’s already ambitious goals for reducing greenhouse gasses.

‘The data is self-evident, the experience that we have in the state of California just underscoring the reality of the ravages of climate change,’ he said. 

‘Mother Nature is physics, biology and chemistry. She bats last and she bats one thousand. That’s the reality we’re facing, the smash mouth reality – this perfect storm. The debate is over around climate change.’

Newsom warned that ‘unless we get our act together on climate change, unless we disabuse ourselves of all the BS that’s being spewed by a very small group of people,’ then time to take action will be lost.

Newsom noted that just in the last month, California had its hottest August, with world-record-setting heat in Death Valley. 

It had 14,000 dry lightning strikes that set off hundreds of fires, some that combined into creating five of the 10 largest fires in the state’s recorded history.     

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COVID Oregon

Oregon COVID-19 death toll reaches 481, cases surpass 28,000 statewide – KATU

Oregon COVID-19 death toll reaches 481, cases surpass 28,000 statewide – KATU
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codes Oregon

Here are the 11 Oregon ZIP codes that had the most new COVID-19 cases last week – KGW.com

Of the five ZIP codes with the largest increases, three were in Marion County.

PORTLAND, Ore. — Data from the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) shows some of the largest COVID-19 spikes last week were in Marion and Multnomah counties.

In its weekly report published Wednesday, OHA updated the breakdown of cases across the state by ZIP code. The data is current as of 11 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 23. Of the 11 areas that had the most new coronavirus cases last week, six were in Multnomah or Marion counties. Of the five ZIP codes with the largest increases, three were in Marion County. Those three together, in the Woodburn and Salem areas, saw 223 new cases.

For the second consecutive week, the Ontario area, in Malheur County, saw the biggest spike: 97914 had 102 new cases.

Other areas that saw noticeable jumps last week were in Jackson, Yamhill and Umatilla counties.

Here’s a look at the 11 ZIP codes with the most new cases:

  • 97914 (Ontario, Malheur County): 102 new cases (from 685 to 787 total cases)
  • 97071 (Woodburn, Marion County): 97 (680 to 777)
  • 97305 (Northeast of Salem, Marion County): 72 (505 to 577)
  • 97501 (Medford, Jackson County): 69 (191 to 260)
  • 97301 (Salem, Marion County): 54 (533 to 587)
  • 97128 (McMinnville, Yamhill County): 49 (259 to 308)
  • 97233 (Rockwood/Centennial, Multnomah County): 38 (611 to 649)
  • 97123 (Hillsboro, Washington County): 37 (434 to 471)
  • 97838 (Hermiston, Umatilla County): 35 (1,375 to 1,410)
  • 97236 (Centennial, Multnomah County): 33 (612 to 645)
  • 97030 (Gresham, Multnomah County): 31 (372 to 403)

Here’s a look at the 11 ZIP codes with the highest increase of cases by percentage:

  • 97501 (Medford, Jackson County): 36% (191 to 260 total cases)
  • 97520 (Ashland, Jackson County): 31% (22 to 29)
  • 97424 (Cottage Grove, Lane County): 29% (17 to 22)
  • 97502 (Central Point, Jackson County): 27% (62 to 79)
  • 97814 (Baker City, Baker County): 22% (50 to 61)
  • 97115 (Dundee, Yamhill County): 20% (35 to 42)
  • 97089 (Damascus, Clackamas County): 20% (59 to 71)
  • 97367 (Lincoln City, Lincoln County): 19% (62 to 74)
  • 97002 (Aurora, Marion County): 19% (36 to 43)
  • 97504 (Medford, Jackson County): 18% (111 to 132)
  • 97128 (McMinnville, Yamhill County): 18% (259 to 308)

How many COVID-19 cases are in your ZIP code? Check here

Although the areas listed above saw noticeable increases, OHA noted in its weekly report that cases statewide decreased 13% from the week before. The positive test rate also dropped to 5.1% last week, down from 5.4% the previous week.

While there’s been progress in limiting the spread of the virus, Oregon still has a long way to go before benchmarks to resume in-person classes are hit. Experts said the average amount of daily cases would need to about 60. Currently, more than 200 daily cases are typically reported.

OHA also reported there were 87 active workplace outbreaks in the state, and 92 workplace outbreaks that were resolved.

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Coronavirus Oregon

Coronavirus in Oregon: 252 new cases, 2 deaths – OregonLive

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(Courtesy of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.)CDC images

Oregon has 252 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, the Oregon Health Authority announced Sunday, and two additional people have died of the virus.

Over the weekend, Oregon surpassed 23,000 confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases.

Where the new cases are by county: Clackamas (26), Clatsop (1), Columbia (4), Deschutes (4), Hood River (2), Jackson (18), Jefferson (3), Josephine ( 1), Klamath (2), Lane (4), Lincoln (1), Linn (5), Malheur (12), Marion (40), Morrow (7), Multnomah (67), Polk (7), Umatilla (15), Wasco (1), Washington (29) and Yamhill (3).

New fatalities: An 86-year-old woman in Clackamas County with underlying conditions died Aug. 13. She tested positive Aug. 12 and is Oregon’s 387th COVID-19 death.

A 52-year-old woman died Aug. 14 at Providence Portland Medical Center, marking the state’s 388th COVID-19 death. She had underlying conditions and tested positive Aug. 5.

The state health authority also gave additional information on the state’s 384th COVID-19  death, a 73-year-old Lane County woman who had underlying conditions. She tested positive July 25 and died Aug. 12 at McKenzie-Willamette Medical Center.

Since it began: OHA has reported 23,262 confirmed and presumptive cases and 388 deaths since the coronavirus pandemic began. OHA also reported that 465,535 people have been tested to date.

— Ryan Nguyen; rnguyen@oregonian.com; @ryanjjnguyen

Note to readers: if you purchase something through one of our affiliate links we may earn a commission.

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Oregon Reports

Oregon reports 1 COVID-19 death: Jefferson County man who died at St. Charles Bend – KTVZ

Man, 71, died Friday, had underlying conditions; fifth Jefferson County death

PORTLAND, Ore. (KTVZ) — COVID-19 has claimed one more life in Oregon, a 71-year-old Jefferson County man who died Friday at St. Charles Bend, raising the state’s death toll to 386, the Oregon Health Authority reported Saturday.

OHA also reported 412 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. Saturday, including 23 in Central Oregon, bringing the state total to 23,018 cases, along with 461,861 negative test results.

The new cases reported Saturday are in the following counties: Baker (1), Benton (4), Clackamas (38), Clatsop (2), Columbia (3), Crook (1), Curry (2), Deschutes (10), Douglas (1), Hood River (1), Jackson (6), Jefferson (12), Josephine (2), Klamath (2), Lane (6), Lincoln (6), Linn (13), Malheur (25), Marion (75), Morrow (8), Multnomah (79), Polk (6), Umatilla (36), Union (1), Wallowa (1), Wasco (2), Washington (56), Yamhill (13).

Oregon’s 386th COVID-19 death, the fifth among Jefferson County residents, is a 71-year-old man who tested positive on August 6 and died on August 14, at St. Charles Bend.. He had underlying conditions.

See table below for total cases, deaths and negative tests by county.

County Cases1 Total deaths2 Negative tests3
Baker 53 0 1157
Benton 186 6 9345
Clackamas 1664 49 44864
Clatsop 90 0 4066
Columbia 106 1 5054
Coos 93 0 4338
Crook 52 1 1943
Curry 19 0 1129
Deschutes 637 11 20415
Douglas 160 1 9014
Gilliam 4 0 208
Grant 4 0 600
Harney 11 0 621
Hood River 216 0 4068
Jackson 542 2 21304
Jefferson 408 5 3733
Josephine 138 2 7534
Klamath 208 2 7889
Lake 32 0 577
Lane 621 4 46910
Lincoln 437 9 7171
Linn 328 11 11992
Malheur 894 15 3671
Marion 3165 73 34449
Morrow 400 3 1331
Multnomah 5264 101 103695
Polk 356 12 5958
Sherman 16 0 279
Tillamook 35 0 2284
Umatilla 2435 32 10140
Union 398 2 2718
Wallowa 21 1 741
Wasco 201 3 3971
Washington 3310 27 66611
Wheeler 0 0 142
Yamhill 514 13 11939
Total 23,018 386 461,861

1This includes cases confirmed by diagnostic testing and presumptive cases. Presumptive cases are those without a positive diagnostic test who present COVID-19-like symptoms and had close contact with a confirmed case. County of residence for cases may change as new information becomes available. If changes occur, we will update our counts accordingly.

2For additional details on individuals who have died from COVID-19 in Oregon, please refer to our press releases.

3This includes cases who test negative and are not epi-linked to a confirmed case.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.

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Oregon Reports

Oregon reports 3 COVID-19 deaths, 277 new cases, 27 in Central Oregon – KTVZ

PORTLAND, Ore. (KTVZ) — COVID-19 has claimed three more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 289, along with 277 new cases, 27 of them in Central Oregon, the Oregon Health Authority reported Sunday.

OHA reported 277 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. Sunday, bringing the state total to 16,758 cases and 361,717 negative test results.

The new cases Sunday are in the following counties: Baker (3), Benton (1), Clackamas (20), Columbia (2), Coos (1), Crook (1), Deschutes (21), Hood River (1), Jackson (15), Jefferson (5), Klamath (1), Lane (8), Lincoln (1), Linn (5), Malheur (10), Marion (30), Morrow (13), Multnomah (44), Polk (2), Umatilla (43), Wasco (5), Washington (39), and Yamhill (6).

Oregon’s 287th COVID-19 death is a 40-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on July 1 and died on July 22 at Legacy Good Samaritan Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 288th COVID-19 death is a 56-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on July 13 and died on July 23 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 289th COVID-19 death is a 63-year-old woman in Malheur County who tested positive on July 15 and died on July 21 at Saint Alphonsus Medical Center in Ontario. She had underlying conditions.

Sunday’s OHA list does not yet include the two most recent Central Oregon COVID-19 deaths that occurred Thursday and have been reported by local officials and family members: Sharran Weeks, 79, at Mt. Bachelor Memory Care in Bend, and Shirley Stayhi Heath, the wife of long-time Warm Springs Chief Delvis Heath Sr. 

See the OHA table below for total cases, deaths and negative tests by county.

County Cases 1 Total deaths 2 Negative tests 3
Baker 22 0 805
Benton 134 6 7,757
Clackamas 1276 34 35,158
Clatsop 68 0 3,284
Columbia 69 0 4,012
Coos 80 0 3,606
Crook 32 1 1,528
Curry 13 0 934
Deschutes 460 3 15,662
Douglas 116 1 7,194
Gilliam 3 0 144
Grant 2 0 475
Harney 6 0 517
Hood River 150 0 3,353
Jackson 291 0 17,107
Jefferson 258 0 2,825
Josephine 84 1 6,060
Klamath 181 1 6,572
Lake 31 0 419
Lane 448 3 37,566
Lincoln 380 8 6,407
Linn 223 10 9,859
Malheur 576 8 2,802
Marion 2,413 65 26,826
Morrow 245 1 1001
Multnomah 3,921 82 80,007
Polk 245 12 4,235
Sherman 8 0 231
Tillamook 24 0 1,866
Umatilla 1,678 16 7,749
Union 385 2 2,247
Wallowa 18 1 591
Wasco 146 3 3,025
Washington 2,495 22 51,198
Wheeler 0 0 132
Yamhill 277 9 8,563
Total 16,758 289 361,717

1 This includes cases confirmed by diagnostic testing and presumptive cases. Presumptive cases are those without a positive diagnostic test who present COVID-19-like symptoms and had close contact with a confirmed case. County of residence for cases may change as new information becomes available. If changes occur, we will update our counts accordingly.

2 For additional details on individuals who have died from COVID-19 in Oregon, please refer to our press releases.

3 This includes cases who test negative and are not epi-linked to a confirmed case.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.

Read More

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Oregon Reports

Oregon reports 344 new COVID-19 cases, 15 in C. Oregon; no new deaths – KTVZ

OHA also lists counties’ spread, ‘sporadic spread’ rates per 100,000

PORTLAND, Ore. (KTVZ) — The state’s death toll from COVID-19 remains unchanged at 209, but another 344 new cases were reported, pushing the total toward 10,000, the Oregon Health Authority reported Friday.

OHA reported 344 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. Friday, bringing the state total to 9,636 cases, along with 245,096 negative test results. The daily case count is second-highest of the pandemic, after Thursday’s record report of 375 new cases.

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported Friday are in the following counties: Benton (7), Clackamas (22), Clatsop (1), Columbia (3), Coos (1), Crook (1), Deschutes (9), Douglas (1), Jackson (9), Jefferson (5), Josephine (3), Klamath (2), Lake (1), Lane (16), Lincoln (18), Linn (2), Malheur (20), Marion (32), Morrow (10), Multnomah (59), Polk (5), Sherman (1), Tillamook (1), Umatilla (49), Union (8), Wasco (10), Washington (46), and Yamhill (1).

The Health Authority also released a table showing recent trends in cases by county between mid-June and the beginning of July.

OHA said, “These trends show where the COVID-19 virus is spreading at the fastest rate and which counties have the highest rates of ‘sporadic’ transmission – i.e., cases that do not have a clear epidemiological link to other outbreaks or clusters of infections and therefore indicate that the virus is spreading uncontained in a community.

Governor Kate Brown identified eight counties that will be placed on a “Watch List” based on these data: Jefferson, Lake, Lincoln, Malheur, Morrow, Umatilla, Union, Wasco. State and local health officials will closely monitor the situation in these counties in coming days and prioritize additional resources to suppress the virus in these hotspot communities.

Recent Data on COVID-19 Spread by County

(June 18, 2020-July 1, 2020)

  Case Count Case Rate / 100,000 population Sporadic Case Rate / 100,000 population
Clatsop 3 7.78 5.19
Lane 89 24.13 5.42
Columbia 5 9.83 5.90
Douglas 15 13.85 6.46
Jackson 46 21.47 8.40
Benton 17 18.94 8.91
Crook 2 8.95 8.95
Coos 9 14.22 11.06
Linn 28 22.79 13.02
Deschutes 54 29.89 14.39
Yamhill 35 33.71 14.45
Josephine 15 17.55 16.38
Klamath 55 82.94 16.59
Hood River 4 17.29 17.29
Baker 3 18.77 18.77
Tillamook 6 23.01 19.17
Polk 21 25.79 20.88
Clackamas 234 57.67 22.43
Marion 320 95.36 30.99
Washington 473 81.30 32.83
Multnomah 640 80.14 36.56
Wallowa 6 86.66 43.33
Lincoln 98 204.67 50.12
Wasco 33 127.58 50.26
Lake 13 165.75 89.25
Jefferson 53 229.01 116.67
Union 102 391.89 138.31
Malheur 98 322.04 193.88
Umatilla 413 537.08 313.40
Morrow 51 454.75 338.83

See the table below for total cumulative cases, deaths, and negative tests by county, as of July 3, 2020.

County Cases1 Total deaths2 Negative tests3
Baker 4 0 512
Benton 91 5 6,241
Clackamas 795 24 23,851
Clatsop 49 0 2,462
Columbia 35 0 2,824
Coos 42 0 2,745
Crook 12 0 1,078
Curry 8 0 722
Deschutes 201 0 10,994
Douglas 45 0 5,121
Gilliam 0 0 97
Grant 1 0 194
Harney 1 0 415
Hood River 88 0 2,379
Jackson 140 0 12,509
Jefferson 131 0 2,020
Josephine 44 1 4,319
Klamath 125 1 5,081
Lake 20 0 251
Lane 196 3 24,379
Lincoln 345 2 4,734
Linn 156 9 6,979
Malheur 160 1 1,698
Marion 1,595 47 17,381
Morrow 82 1 520
Multnomah 2,361 69 53,268
Polk 154 12 2,946
Sherman 2 0 149
Tillamook 13 0 1,359
Umatilla 667 4 4,071
Union 355 1 1,712
Wallowa 10 0 436
Wasco 85 1 2,253
Washington 1,491 20 33,807
Wheeler 0 0 122
Yamhill 132 8 5,467
Total 9,636 209 245,096

1 This includes cases confirmed by diagnostic testing and presumptive cases. Presumptive cases are those without a positive diagnostic test who present COVID-19-like symptoms and had close contact with a confirmed case. County of residence for cases may change as new information becomes available. If changes occur, we will update our counts accordingly.

2 For additional details on individuals who have died from COVID-19 in Oregon, please refer to our press releases.

3 This includes cases who test negative and are not epi-linked to a confirmed case.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.

Read More

Categories
Coronavirus Oregon

Coronavirus in Oregon: 281 new cases on Wednesday, a record high – OregonLive

Oregon Governor Kate Brown's press conference

Oregon Governor Kate Brown heads into the press conference Friday where she laid out a COVID-19 containment strategy for the state and plans for reopening. May 1, 2020 Beth Nakamura/Staff

The Oregon Health Authority reported a record-breaking count of daily coronavirus cases Wednesday with 281, topping the previous record of 278 set June 17.

The disclosure of cases comes as high infection rates occurred throughout central and eastern Oregon.

The Oregon Health Authority on Twitter cited workplace outbreaks and increased testing as contributors to the high case count and urged citizens to practice physical distancing, wear masks and stay home when feeling sick.

The record case count also comes as Gov. Kate Brown addressed in an hour-long news conference a new rule requiring Oregonians ages 12 and up to wear masks in indoor public spaces starting Wednesday. Compliance with the rule will be essential in determining whether businesses will remain open statewide and whether schools will reopen next fall, Brown said.

The highest case count Wednesday came from Washington County, with 48 new confirmed or presumed infections. That’s the county’s highest daily total since the outbreak began, surpassing the 44 cases reported June 27.

Wednesday’s surge pushed the state’s average from the past week to more than 215 cases a day, which is also a record.

Where the new cases are by county: Baker (3), Benton (2), Clackamas (20), Clatsop (1), Columbia (1), Deschutes (4), Douglas (2), Jackson (3), Jefferson (7), Klamath (4), Lake (2), Lane (12), Lincoln (12), Linn (7), Malheur (16), Marion (27), Morrow (2), Multnomah (38), Polk (8), Tillamook (2), Umatilla (42), Union (5), Wallowa (2), Wasco (4), Washington (48) and Yamhill (7).

New fatalities: Oregon’s sole victim of COVID-19 is a 91-year-old woman with underlying health conditions from Marion County, state officials reported. She tested positive eleven days prior to her death on June 29. The location of her death has yet to be determined.

Prevalence of infections: State officials reported that 5,711 people have been tested since Tuesday and 260 came back positive, amounting to a positivity rate of 4.6%.

Who got infected: Since yesterday, state data showed an increase of 277 confirmed or presumed cases across the following ages: 0-9 (13); 10-19 (41); 20-29 (56); 30-39 (40); 40-49 (43); 50-59 (34); 60-69 (31); 70-79 (16); 80 and older (3)

Who’s in the hospital: The state on Wednesday reported that 118 Oregonians with confirmed cases of COVID-19 are currently in the hospital – thirteen more than yesterday. Hospitalizations continue to increase on average statewide, but hundreds of ICU beds and ventilators remain available.

Since it began: Oregon has now reported 8,931 presumed and confirmed cases of COVID-19 and 208 deaths. In total, 242,954 people have been tested in the state.

— Bryce Dole, bdole@oregonian.com, 541-660-9844, @DoleBryce

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