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Oregon Reports

Oregon reports 3 COVID-19 deaths, 277 new cases, 27 in Central Oregon – KTVZ

PORTLAND, Ore. (KTVZ) — COVID-19 has claimed three more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 289, along with 277 new cases, 27 of them in Central Oregon, the Oregon Health Authority reported Sunday.

OHA reported 277 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. Sunday, bringing the state total to 16,758 cases and 361,717 negative test results.

The new cases Sunday are in the following counties: Baker (3), Benton (1), Clackamas (20), Columbia (2), Coos (1), Crook (1), Deschutes (21), Hood River (1), Jackson (15), Jefferson (5), Klamath (1), Lane (8), Lincoln (1), Linn (5), Malheur (10), Marion (30), Morrow (13), Multnomah (44), Polk (2), Umatilla (43), Wasco (5), Washington (39), and Yamhill (6).

Oregon’s 287th COVID-19 death is a 40-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on July 1 and died on July 22 at Legacy Good Samaritan Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 288th COVID-19 death is a 56-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on July 13 and died on July 23 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 289th COVID-19 death is a 63-year-old woman in Malheur County who tested positive on July 15 and died on July 21 at Saint Alphonsus Medical Center in Ontario. She had underlying conditions.

Sunday’s OHA list does not yet include the two most recent Central Oregon COVID-19 deaths that occurred Thursday and have been reported by local officials and family members: Sharran Weeks, 79, at Mt. Bachelor Memory Care in Bend, and Shirley Stayhi Heath, the wife of long-time Warm Springs Chief Delvis Heath Sr. 

See the OHA table below for total cases, deaths and negative tests by county.

County Cases 1 Total deaths 2 Negative tests 3
Baker 22 0 805
Benton 134 6 7,757
Clackamas 1276 34 35,158
Clatsop 68 0 3,284
Columbia 69 0 4,012
Coos 80 0 3,606
Crook 32 1 1,528
Curry 13 0 934
Deschutes 460 3 15,662
Douglas 116 1 7,194
Gilliam 3 0 144
Grant 2 0 475
Harney 6 0 517
Hood River 150 0 3,353
Jackson 291 0 17,107
Jefferson 258 0 2,825
Josephine 84 1 6,060
Klamath 181 1 6,572
Lake 31 0 419
Lane 448 3 37,566
Lincoln 380 8 6,407
Linn 223 10 9,859
Malheur 576 8 2,802
Marion 2,413 65 26,826
Morrow 245 1 1001
Multnomah 3,921 82 80,007
Polk 245 12 4,235
Sherman 8 0 231
Tillamook 24 0 1,866
Umatilla 1,678 16 7,749
Union 385 2 2,247
Wallowa 18 1 591
Wasco 146 3 3,025
Washington 2,495 22 51,198
Wheeler 0 0 132
Yamhill 277 9 8,563
Total 16,758 289 361,717

1 This includes cases confirmed by diagnostic testing and presumptive cases. Presumptive cases are those without a positive diagnostic test who present COVID-19-like symptoms and had close contact with a confirmed case. County of residence for cases may change as new information becomes available. If changes occur, we will update our counts accordingly.

2 For additional details on individuals who have died from COVID-19 in Oregon, please refer to our press releases.

3 This includes cases who test negative and are not epi-linked to a confirmed case.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.

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Oregon Reports

Oregon reports 344 new COVID-19 cases, 15 in C. Oregon; no new deaths – KTVZ

OHA also lists counties’ spread, ‘sporadic spread’ rates per 100,000

PORTLAND, Ore. (KTVZ) — The state’s death toll from COVID-19 remains unchanged at 209, but another 344 new cases were reported, pushing the total toward 10,000, the Oregon Health Authority reported Friday.

OHA reported 344 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. Friday, bringing the state total to 9,636 cases, along with 245,096 negative test results. The daily case count is second-highest of the pandemic, after Thursday’s record report of 375 new cases.

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported Friday are in the following counties: Benton (7), Clackamas (22), Clatsop (1), Columbia (3), Coos (1), Crook (1), Deschutes (9), Douglas (1), Jackson (9), Jefferson (5), Josephine (3), Klamath (2), Lake (1), Lane (16), Lincoln (18), Linn (2), Malheur (20), Marion (32), Morrow (10), Multnomah (59), Polk (5), Sherman (1), Tillamook (1), Umatilla (49), Union (8), Wasco (10), Washington (46), and Yamhill (1).

The Health Authority also released a table showing recent trends in cases by county between mid-June and the beginning of July.

OHA said, “These trends show where the COVID-19 virus is spreading at the fastest rate and which counties have the highest rates of ‘sporadic’ transmission – i.e., cases that do not have a clear epidemiological link to other outbreaks or clusters of infections and therefore indicate that the virus is spreading uncontained in a community.

Governor Kate Brown identified eight counties that will be placed on a “Watch List” based on these data: Jefferson, Lake, Lincoln, Malheur, Morrow, Umatilla, Union, Wasco. State and local health officials will closely monitor the situation in these counties in coming days and prioritize additional resources to suppress the virus in these hotspot communities.

Recent Data on COVID-19 Spread by County

(June 18, 2020-July 1, 2020)

  Case Count Case Rate / 100,000 population Sporadic Case Rate / 100,000 population
Clatsop 3 7.78 5.19
Lane 89 24.13 5.42
Columbia 5 9.83 5.90
Douglas 15 13.85 6.46
Jackson 46 21.47 8.40
Benton 17 18.94 8.91
Crook 2 8.95 8.95
Coos 9 14.22 11.06
Linn 28 22.79 13.02
Deschutes 54 29.89 14.39
Yamhill 35 33.71 14.45
Josephine 15 17.55 16.38
Klamath 55 82.94 16.59
Hood River 4 17.29 17.29
Baker 3 18.77 18.77
Tillamook 6 23.01 19.17
Polk 21 25.79 20.88
Clackamas 234 57.67 22.43
Marion 320 95.36 30.99
Washington 473 81.30 32.83
Multnomah 640 80.14 36.56
Wallowa 6 86.66 43.33
Lincoln 98 204.67 50.12
Wasco 33 127.58 50.26
Lake 13 165.75 89.25
Jefferson 53 229.01 116.67
Union 102 391.89 138.31
Malheur 98 322.04 193.88
Umatilla 413 537.08 313.40
Morrow 51 454.75 338.83

See the table below for total cumulative cases, deaths, and negative tests by county, as of July 3, 2020.

County Cases1 Total deaths2 Negative tests3
Baker 4 0 512
Benton 91 5 6,241
Clackamas 795 24 23,851
Clatsop 49 0 2,462
Columbia 35 0 2,824
Coos 42 0 2,745
Crook 12 0 1,078
Curry 8 0 722
Deschutes 201 0 10,994
Douglas 45 0 5,121
Gilliam 0 0 97
Grant 1 0 194
Harney 1 0 415
Hood River 88 0 2,379
Jackson 140 0 12,509
Jefferson 131 0 2,020
Josephine 44 1 4,319
Klamath 125 1 5,081
Lake 20 0 251
Lane 196 3 24,379
Lincoln 345 2 4,734
Linn 156 9 6,979
Malheur 160 1 1,698
Marion 1,595 47 17,381
Morrow 82 1 520
Multnomah 2,361 69 53,268
Polk 154 12 2,946
Sherman 2 0 149
Tillamook 13 0 1,359
Umatilla 667 4 4,071
Union 355 1 1,712
Wallowa 10 0 436
Wasco 85 1 2,253
Washington 1,491 20 33,807
Wheeler 0 0 122
Yamhill 132 8 5,467
Total 9,636 209 245,096

1 This includes cases confirmed by diagnostic testing and presumptive cases. Presumptive cases are those without a positive diagnostic test who present COVID-19-like symptoms and had close contact with a confirmed case. County of residence for cases may change as new information becomes available. If changes occur, we will update our counts accordingly.

2 For additional details on individuals who have died from COVID-19 in Oregon, please refer to our press releases.

3 This includes cases who test negative and are not epi-linked to a confirmed case.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.

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Coronavirus Oregon

Coronavirus in Oregon: 281 new cases on Wednesday, a record high – OregonLive

Oregon Governor Kate Brown's press conference

Oregon Governor Kate Brown heads into the press conference Friday where she laid out a COVID-19 containment strategy for the state and plans for reopening. May 1, 2020 Beth Nakamura/Staff

The Oregon Health Authority reported a record-breaking count of daily coronavirus cases Wednesday with 281, topping the previous record of 278 set June 17.

The disclosure of cases comes as high infection rates occurred throughout central and eastern Oregon.

The Oregon Health Authority on Twitter cited workplace outbreaks and increased testing as contributors to the high case count and urged citizens to practice physical distancing, wear masks and stay home when feeling sick.

The record case count also comes as Gov. Kate Brown addressed in an hour-long news conference a new rule requiring Oregonians ages 12 and up to wear masks in indoor public spaces starting Wednesday. Compliance with the rule will be essential in determining whether businesses will remain open statewide and whether schools will reopen next fall, Brown said.

The highest case count Wednesday came from Washington County, with 48 new confirmed or presumed infections. That’s the county’s highest daily total since the outbreak began, surpassing the 44 cases reported June 27.

Wednesday’s surge pushed the state’s average from the past week to more than 215 cases a day, which is also a record.

Where the new cases are by county: Baker (3), Benton (2), Clackamas (20), Clatsop (1), Columbia (1), Deschutes (4), Douglas (2), Jackson (3), Jefferson (7), Klamath (4), Lake (2), Lane (12), Lincoln (12), Linn (7), Malheur (16), Marion (27), Morrow (2), Multnomah (38), Polk (8), Tillamook (2), Umatilla (42), Union (5), Wallowa (2), Wasco (4), Washington (48) and Yamhill (7).

New fatalities: Oregon’s sole victim of COVID-19 is a 91-year-old woman with underlying health conditions from Marion County, state officials reported. She tested positive eleven days prior to her death on June 29. The location of her death has yet to be determined.

Prevalence of infections: State officials reported that 5,711 people have been tested since Tuesday and 260 came back positive, amounting to a positivity rate of 4.6%.

Who got infected: Since yesterday, state data showed an increase of 277 confirmed or presumed cases across the following ages: 0-9 (13); 10-19 (41); 20-29 (56); 30-39 (40); 40-49 (43); 50-59 (34); 60-69 (31); 70-79 (16); 80 and older (3)

Who’s in the hospital: The state on Wednesday reported that 118 Oregonians with confirmed cases of COVID-19 are currently in the hospital – thirteen more than yesterday. Hospitalizations continue to increase on average statewide, but hundreds of ICU beds and ventilators remain available.

Since it began: Oregon has now reported 8,931 presumed and confirmed cases of COVID-19 and 208 deaths. In total, 242,954 people have been tested in the state.

— Bryce Dole, bdole@oregonian.com, 541-660-9844, @DoleBryce

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Oregon State

Oregon, Oregon State Rivalry Will No Longer Reference Civil War – SportsLogos.Net News

The longstanding rivalry between the Oregon Ducks and Oregon State Beavers will no longer be referred to as the Civil War, the universities announced in a joint statement on Friday afternoon.

“Changing this name is overdue as it represents a connection to a war fought to perpetuate slavery,” Oregon State president Ed Ray said. “While not intended as reference to the actual Civil War, OSU sports competition should not provide any misconstrued reference to this divisive episode in American history. That we did not act before to change the name was a mistake. We do so now, along with other important actions to advance equal opportunity and justice for all and in recognition that black lives matter.”

“A number of student-athletes, alumni and friends of Oregon State University have questioned the use of the term Civil War in our rivalry series in recent years.” – @BeaverAD Scott Barnes pic.twitter.com/SdWM1DjMHX

— Go Beavs (@BeaverAthletics) June 26, 2020

Oregon athletic director Rob Mullens, meanwhile, mentioned former Ducks quarterback Dennis Dixon (2004-07) as the catalyst for the change.

“Today’s announcement is not only right but is a long time coming,” Mullens said. “We must all recognize the power of words and the symbolism associated with the Civil War. This mutual decision is in the best interests of both schools, and I would like to thank Scott Barnes for his diligence as we worked through this process. We look forward to our continued and fierce in-state rivalry with Oregon State in all sports.”

As a player, he led us into a national championship race. Now, he’s a leading voice for change regarding today’s announcement.

Here’s Dennis Dixon on how the conversation took shape: pic.twitter.com/5eq6T7FErm

— Oregon Football (@oregonfootball) June 26, 2020

The storied rivalry between Oregon and Oregon State dates back to 1894, when the latter was named the Oregon Agricultural College. It was referred to as the Oregon Classic or the State Championship Game until 1937, when it was officially dubbed the Civil War — though newspapers occasionally used that moniker as early as 1929.

The Ducks and Beavers have played 123 times, with Oregon leading the all-time series 66-47-10. It is the fifth-most played rivalry in the Football Bowl Subdivision, trailing only Minnesota-Wisconsin (129 games), Auburn-Georgia (124), North Carolina-Virginia (124) and Cincinnati-Miami, Ohio (124). This year’s matchup is scheduled to take place on Nov. 28 at Reser Stadium in Corvallis.

The basketball programs, on the other hand, have met a record 354 times. Interestingly enough, some combination of Oregon or Oregon State against one another, Washington or Washington State make up the five most-played games in college basketball history.

The rivalry had a corporate sponsor beginning in 1999, when it became known as the Northwest Dodge Dealers Civil War Series. PacificSource Health Plans stepped in when that 10-year partnership ended and held the title sponsor role until 2015, when it was joined by other sponsors such as Ford, McDonald’s, Safeway-Albertsons, Spirit Mountain Casinos, Toyota and Wells Fargo.

The Oregon and Oregon State football teams do not officially play for a trophy, though the Platypus Trophy was commissioned for the rivalry in 1959 because of its duck-like bill and beaver-like tail. It was awarded through the 1961 season, when it was stolen from the Ducks’ trophy case inside Gill Coliseum. It was returned, but then stolen a second time and somehow reappropriated as the trophy for the water polo teams. 

The trophy then went missing for nearly four decades before it was found in a closet at Oregon’s McArthur Court in 2005. It became the football game’s unofficial trophy two years later and is currently awarded to the alumni association of the winning school.

Barnes said the two schools will consider another moniker for the rivalry moving forward. Might we suggest the obvious, which would be to embrace trophy and name it the Battle for the Platypus – or Battylpus, for short.

Photos via the University of Oregon, Oregon State University, Nike and the Daily Emerald.

Andrew Lind

Andrew Lind is an Ohio State football beat writer and photographer at Buckeye Sports Bulletin; founder of The Ohio State Uniform Database; and the NCAA and NFL writer at SportsLogos.net. Follow him on Twitter at @AndrewMLind.

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County Oregon

Oregon county issues face mask order that exempts non-white people – New York Post

June 23, 2020 | 2:11pm | Updated June 23, 2020 | 3:28pm

Lincoln County, Oregon, has exempted non-white people from a new order requiring that face coverings be worn in public — to prevent racial profiling.

Health officials announced last week residents must wear face coverings in public settings where they may come within six feet of another individual who is not from the same household.

But people of color do not have to follow the new rule if they have “heightened concerns about racial profiling and harassment” over wearing the masks, officials said.

“No person shall intimidate or harass people who do not comply,” health officials said.

With mask requirements becoming more common, activists have raised concerns that the directives could put non-white people in danger.

“For many black people, deciding whether or not to wear a bandanna in public to protect themselves and others from contracting coronavirus is a lose-lose situation that can result in life-threatening consequences either way,” ReNika Moore, director of the ACLU’s Racial Justice Program, told CNN.

Trevon Logan, who is black, said orders to wear face coverings are “basically telling people to look dangerous given racial stereotypes that are out there.”

“This is in the larger context of black men fitting the description of a suspect who has a hood on, who has a face covering on,” Logan, an economics professor at Ohio State University, told the outlet.

“It looks like almost every criminal sketch of any garden-variety black suspect.”

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Coronavirus Oregon

Oregon coronavirus death toll hits 192, statewide cases surpass 7000 – KATU

Oregon coronavirus death toll hits 192, statewide cases surpass 7000 – KATU
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Coronavirus Oregon

Coronavirus in Oregon: 3 new deaths reported as cases grow to nearly 4,100 – oregonlive.com

The Oregon Health Authority on Thursday reported three new deaths from the novel coronavirus bringing the state’s toll to 151 people as known cases rose to 4,086.

A 73-year-old Clackamas County woman died May 16 at her home, the public health agency said. A 73-year-old Multnomah County man died Tuesday at Providence Portland Medical Center. A 72-year-old Polk County man also died, but the health authority said it didn’t have more information yet on when and where he died.

In the last 24 hours, state health officials also reported 49 new confirmed and presumptive coronavirus cases. Seven of the new cases are tied to the Townsend Farms outbreak.

The new cases were in 10 of Oregon’s 36 counties: Clackamas (4), Deschutes (1), Jefferson (1), Malheur (5), Marion (11), Multnomah (10), Umatilla (2), Wasco (1), Washington (12) and Yamhill (2).

Coronavirus in Oregon: Latest news | Live map tracker |Text alerts | Newsletter

Death toll: The 151 people who have died from the virus are from 12 counties — 59 people from Multnomah, 25 from Marion, 17 from Washington, 11 from Polk, 11 from Clackamas, nine from Linn, seven from Yamhill, five from Benton, three from Umatilla, two from Lane, one each from Josephine and Wasco.

Their ages ranged from 41 to 100. Among those who have died, 64 were women and 87 were men.

[Read about Oregon coronavirus deaths. Help us learn more.]

Senior care homes: Nearly six out of 10 coronavirus deaths in Oregon — at least 86 — are associated with a care center, a newsroom analysis of state data shows. About 550 to 600 senior care home residents, staff and close contacts from 66 nursing, assisted and retirement homes have contracted the coronavirus.

Most of the dead are believed to be residents. Oregon Health Authority officials have declined to say exactly how many of the dead and ill are health care workers, citing “limited epidemiology staff resources.”

County case totals: Seven counties — Multnomah, Marion, Washington, Clackamas, Linn, Deschutes and Umatilla — have reported 100 coronavirus cases or more. Gilliam and Wheeler still have reported none.

Here’s the overall count — confirmed and presumptive cases — by county: Baker (1), Benton (55), Clackamas (304), Clatsop (45), Columbia (16), Coos (31), Crook (6), Curry (6), Deschutes (121), Douglas (25), Grant (1), Harney (1), Hood River, (13), Jackson (65), Jefferson (25), Josephine (25), Klamath (41), Lake (2), Lane (67), Lincoln (10), Linn (115), Malheur (33), Marion (931), Morrow (12), Multnomah (1,103), Polk (98), Sherman (1), Tillamook (6), Umatilla (114), Union (6), Wallowa (2), Wasco (21), Washington (715) and Yamhill (69).

Testing: Another 2,654 people received coronavirus test results, up from the previous day’s 1,451, according to figures published on the health authority’s website.

So far, 116,901 Oregonians have been tested for the illness since the state confirmed its first case on Feb. 28.

Ages: Cases are so far spread relatively evenly among people in their 20s (16%), people in their 30s (17%), people in their 40s (17%) and people in their 50s (17%).

The breakdown: 0-9 (57), ages 10-19 (154), ages 20-29 (652), ages 30-39 (694), ages 40-49 (698), ages 50-59 (708), ages 60-69 (543), ages 70-79 (346), ages 80-plus (233).

Gender: So far, 2,126 of the cases are among women, or 52%, and 1,956 or 48%, are among men. But more men have died: 87 compared to 64 women.

Hospitalizations: At least 768 of the state’s COVID-19 patients, or 19%, have been hospitalized at some point during their illness, according to the health authority. Currently, 53 people with confirmed coronavirus cases are hospitalized, including 18 in intensive care and 12 on ventilators.

The majority of those hospitalized — 448 — have been 60 or older.

Recoveries: At least 2,014 COVID-19 patients have recovered from the illness, the health authority said.

Here’s the list by county: Benton (30), Clackamas (164), Clatsop (6), Columbia (15), Coos (3), Crook (1), Curry (4), Deschutes (97), Douglas (23), Grant (1), Hood River (7), Jackson (49), Jefferson (22), Josephine (21), Klamath (37), Lane (61), Lincoln (8), Linn (70), Malheur (18), Marion (345), Morrow, (7), Multnomah (413), Polk (44), Sherman (1), Tillamook (6), Umatilla (91), Union (5), Wallowa (1), Wasco (14), Washington (410), Yamhill (40).

Cases in Oregon prisons: On Thursday, the Oregon Department of Corrections reported two new cases since Tuesday, bringing the total to 154 confirmed cases among inmates. Both of the new cases are at the Oregon State Penitentiary. Positive cases have been reported at the Oregon State Penitentiary (120), Shutter Creek Correctional Institution (25) Santiam Correctional Institution (8) and Two Rivers Correctional Institution (1).

Nationwide: Confirmed coronavirus cases stood at more than 1.7 million. The death toll climbed past 101,000.

— Margaret Haberman; 503-221-8375

Email at mhaberman@oregonian.com

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officials Oregon

Oregon Officials Say COVID-19 Outbreak at Townsend Farms Affects 48 of 350 Newly Arrived Seasonal Workers – Willamette Week

The Oregon Health Authority this afternoon filled in details of the COVID-19 outbreak at Townsend Farms that WW first reported this morning.

Townsend Farms, a sixth-generation fruit growing and processing company, relies on hundreds of seasonal workers.

OHA says many of those workers arrived in Multnomah County last week already suffering from COVID-19.

“The outbreak currently affects a total of 48 of about 350 people who arrived in the Portland metro area May 23 and 24 to harvest fruit from Townsend-owned sites in Fairview and Cornelius,” OHA said in a statement. “The individuals are believed to have been exposed to the virus prior to coming to Oregon. An additional 13 samples are still pending at the Oregon State Public Health Laboratory.”

OHA also confirmed another piece of WW‘s earlier story—that Townsend Farms had an earlier outbreak of COVID-19.

“This [new] COVID-19 outbreak affecting workers in Fairview and Cornelius is separate from an outbreak at the same company that began April 29 when permanent employees at the company’s Fairview location tested positive for the virus,” OHA said. “These cases were reported to OHA, which in turn reported them to the public as part of its daily case reporting.”

OHA director Pat Allen says his agency preemptively decided to test agricultural workers coming to Oregon for the beginning of the berry harvest.

“People employed in agriculture are essential workers. They are also a vital part of our community,” Allen said. “The agricultural work environment can put them at higher risk of infection from a communicable disease like COVID-19, and we need to do everything we can to reduce that risk. State and local public health officials are committed to working with the agriculture industry to reduce the risk of infection for workers.”

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Biden Oregon

Biden wins Oregon primary | TheHill – The Hill

Former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenPro-Trump outside groups raise .8 million in April Biden wins Oregon primary Graham to release report on his probe into Russia investigation before election MORE won Oregon’s presidential primary Tuesday, the latest notch on his belt on his march to the Democratic 2020 nomination.

The race was called by the Associated Press minutes after polls closed at 11 p.m. Eastern time. Biden won with roughly 70 percent of the vote with just over 40 percent of precincts reporting.

The former vice president will take the lion’s share of Oregon’s 61 pledged delegates after besting Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersBiden wins Oregon primary Joe Rogan announces exclusive deal with Spotify Author: Biden ‘completely different’ from FDR   MORE (I-Vt.) in the Beaver State. 

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Sander suspended his presidential campaign last month but is remaining on primary ballots to try to rack up more delegates and influence the Democratic Party’s platform at its convention this summer. 

Tuesday’s contest was conducted entirely by mail. Oregon established vote-by-mail as the standard mechanism for voting in the state in 1998 after passing a citizen’s initiative. Other states have pushed for increased mail ballot options this year amid the coronavirus outbreak.

Biden’s victory in the deep blue state comes as polling shows him leading President TrumpDonald John TrumpPro-Trump outside groups raise .8 million in April Biden wins Oregon primary Graham to release report on his probe into Russia investigation before election MORE in a head-to-head matchup in November, with the Real Clear Politics polling average showing the former vice president up 4.7 percent. Polls also show Biden leading in a handful of key swing states, including Arizona, Michigan, and Pennsylvania.

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Coronavirus Oregon

Coronavirus in Oregon: 57 new cases, 5 new deaths, health officials announce Saturday – OregonLive

The Oregon Health Authority on Saturday reported five new deaths from coronavirus as confirmed cases climbed by 57 to 2,635.

The agency announced that a 64-year-old man from Polk County, a 70-year-old man from Multnomah County, a 75-year-old man from Multnomah County, a 91-year-old woman from Marion County and a 76-year-old woman from Umatilla County had died from the disease. That brings the state’s death toll to 109. All suffered from underlying conditions, though the state did not specify what those conditions were.

In addition, state health officials said 57 residents — from Clackamas (2), Deschutes (2), Hood River (1), Jefferson (3), Lane (4), Malheur (2), Marion (15), Morrow (1), Multnomah (14), Umatilla (4) and Washington (9) counties — tested positive for the virus in the last 24 hours.

More than 2,000 new people received coronavirus test results during that same time period, according to figures published on the health authority’s website. Just over 60,000 Oregonians have been tested for the illness since the state reported its first case on Feb. 28.

The latest figures came a day after Gov. Kate Brown and public health officials unveiled new details of the state’s plan to beef up testing and contact tracing as businesses look to reopen amid the pandemic.

Brown and other state officials said they are trying to balance the desire to restart the economy against the threat of more deaths, suggesting that risks can be managed by adding 600 people to perform public health investigations and ensuring 15,000 Oregonians can be tested for the virus each week.

On Saturday, several hundred anti-government protesters staged a “reopen Oregon” rally in Salem outside of the Capitol.

Death toll: Health officials have reported 104 previous COVID-19 deaths in the state, including residents from Benton, Clackamas, Josephine, Lane, Linn, Marion, Multnomah, Polk, Washington, Wasco and Yamhill and counties.

[Read about Oregon coronavirus deaths. Help us learn more.]

Their ages ranged from 41 to 98. The average age is 78. All but one had an underlying medical condition at the time of their death, according to state health officials.

At least 57 of the state’s coronavirus deaths have been people associated with senior care homes in Oregon, according to state officials.

Underlying health conditions: A state review of Oregon’s coronavirus-related deaths published this week found the most common underlying medical conditions to include cardiovascular disease, neurological conditions, diabetes and lung disease.

County case numbers: There are now known coronavirus cases linked to 32 of Oregon’s 36 counties. The counties with the most reported infections are Multnomah (734), Marion (523), Washington (509) and Clackamas (224).

Ages: Of the state’s known cases, 1,299 people, or 48%, are under age 50, state figures show. Another 431, or 16%, are over 70.

Hospitalizations: At least 595 of the state’s COVID-19 patients, or 23%, have been hospitalized at some point during their illness, according to the Oregon Health Authority. Nineteen of them are currently on ventilators.

Recoveries: At least 860 Oregonians who have tested positive for the virus — more than a third of the known cases — are no longer believed to be infected with the illness, the Oregon Health Authority said in a report published earlier this week.

The health authority said it considers a coronavirus patient recovered if they don’t display the symptoms of coughing, fever or shortness of breath for 72 hours. Those who are asymptomatic are considered recovered seven days after their last positive test.

Nationwide: Nationwide, more than 1.1 million Americans have tested positive for COVID-19 while the number of deaths topped 65,000, including at least 814 in Washington.

— Kale Williams; kwilliams@oregonian.com; 503-294-4048; @sfkale

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