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Seven people shot at Milwaukee funeral home, police say – CNN

(CNN)Seven people were shot at a funeral home in Milwaukee on Wednesday, police officials said.

“At approximately 12:45 p.m., Milwaukee police were dispatched to a shooting on the 4200 block of West Fond Du Lac Ave,” acting Milwaukee Police Department Chief Michael Brunson said in a news conference.
“Upon arrival, officers and personnel located seven shooting victims here at that location.”
The male and female victims are between the ages of 24 and 48 years old, according to Brunson.
“The victims were transported to a local hospital where they are being treated for their injuries,” he added. “Right now, all of them are in stable condition.”
Police said they are still investigating the incident and seeking an unknown suspect.

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More Than 1 Million People Have Died From COVID-19 Worldwide : Goats and Soda – NPR

Relatives at a mass burial of pandemic victims at the Parque Taruma cemetery in Manaus, Brazil, mourn a family member.

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Relatives at a mass burial of pandemic victims at the Parque Taruma cemetery in Manaus, Brazil, mourn a family member.

Andre Coelho/Getty Images

The coronavirus pandemic has now killed at least 1 million people worldwide. That’s according to a tally maintained by Johns Hopkins University. This sobering milestone was reached just nine months after the first reported fatality in China last January. And public health experts believe the actual toll – the recorded deaths plus the unrecorded deaths – is much higher. What’s more, in the five worst-off countries, the trend line remains worrisome. Here’s how they line up — and why Argentina could soon join their ranks.

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1. United States

Take the United States, which currently leads the world in terms of both total number of dead and total number of infected over the course of the pandemic. While several Northeastern states that were clobbered by the virus early on managed to use social distancing and masking to push down their new cases by early spring, states in other regions then quickly moved to re-open. This fueled an even bigger wave of deaths across wide swaths of the U.S. throughout the summer. Since then many states have managed to bring down their numbers — as well as the overall U.S. daily death count. Yet it remains far higher than it was in July. Also, most recently, daily deaths have actually begun rising again — largely driven by increasing transmission in various states in the Great Plains and the South.

2. Brazil

Brazil, the second-biggest driver of the worldwide death toll, is also once again trouble. Led by a president who repeatedly downplayed the threat from the coronavirus, Brazil’s initial response was chaotic at best, enabling a surge in deaths all through July and August. About a month ago, the daily death count began dropping. But more recently that progress seems to have stalled.

3. India

The trajectory has been even more unremittingly terrible in India — which has the third-highest death toll. Since May, when the government largely lifted a strict lockdown, infections and deaths have been on a virtually uninterrupted upward spiral. One caveat is that when these cases are measured as a share of India’s population, India actually ranks fairly low. That’s in marked contrast with both Brazil and the United States. Also, over the last several weeks India’s daily death count appears to have hit something of plateau. Still, the total number of people dying there remains extremely high — with an average of about 1,100 deaths each day over the last week.

4. Mexico

Mexico too is struggling. It doesn’t just follow the U.S., Brazil and India when it comes to highest total deaths over the entirety of the pandemic. Over the last two weeks, all four countries have also had the highest number of average daily deaths.

Why The Pandemic Could Change The Way We Record Deaths

5. United Kingdom

The United Kingdom — ranked fifth when it comes to total death toll — is faring only slightly better. New infections have risen to their highest level there since early May. And while the death toll remains much lower, it too has begun creeping up again. More alarming, however, is the situation in European neighbors Spain and France — where both daily new cases and daily new deaths have recently increased markedly, putting both countries in the top 10 on those measures over the last two weeks.

Could Argentina be far behind?

Meanwhile, countries such as Argentina offer a reminder that the full contours of the pandemic’s impact won’t be clear until it’s over. Three months ago Argentina seemed to be doing comparatively well. That’s one reason it still doesn’t quite rank among the top 10 countries in terms of total deaths over the entirety of the pandemic. But since June, Argentina has seen a steady increase in infections and fatalities. And over the last two weeks its daily new death count has ranked fifth-highest in the world, with little sign of slowing down.

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Nearly People

Nearly 11,000 people have been exposed to the coronavirus on flights, the CDC says – The Washington Post

That does not mean it hasn’t happened, and recent scientific studies have documented likely cases of transmission on flights abroad.

“An absence of cases identified or reported is not evidence that there were no cases,” said Caitlin Shockey, a spokeswoman for the CDC’s Division of Global Migration and Quarantine.

“CDC is not able to definitively determine that potential cases were associated (or not) with exposure in the air cabin or through air travel given the numerous opportunities for potential exposure associated with the entire travel journey and widespread global distribution of the virus,” Shockey wrote in an email.

She said that though the agency has received information about people who may have been exposed on flights subsequently becoming ill with the novel coronavirus, pinpointing when someone was exposed is difficult. Local health authorities also might not be able to test people reported as exposed or share test results with the CDC, she said.

In guidance for the public, the CDC acknowledges that viruses do not spread easily on planes because of the way the air is filtered, but it also emphasizes that air travel means being in proximity to people for long periods and encountering frequently touched surfaces on planes and in airports.

The CDC’s guidance for all kinds of travel is still that staying home is the best way to protect yourself and other people from the virus.

Michael Carome, the director of health research at the consumer organization Public Citizen, said the CDC numbers demonstrate that flying poses at least some risk of being exposed to the virus. Public Citizen has called on the Department of Transportation to mandate that masks be worn on planes.

“Wearing masks or face coverings is a simple, easy public health measure to take,” Carome said. “There have been people who were infectious who traveled, and that means, indeed, there is real measurable risk of exposure on airliners.”

A deficiency of data

The total numbers of people flying while carrying the virus and those exposed are unknown.

States have long worked with the federal government to track the spread of infectious diseases on planes. But of the nearly 100 state and major local health departments contacted by The Washington Post, most did not provide a number of coronavirus cases they have documented involving air travel, with some saying they were not tracking that data. In addition, not every case identified locally becomes a CDC investigation.

Six health departments were able to provide numbers, saying they had identified more than 500 cases between them, figures that in some cases covered only a few weeks.

Despite the documented risk of exposure, some experts as well as state and local public health officials say that being on a plane presents less of an infection risk than drinking at a crowded bar or going to an indoor party. The air on a plane is pulled out of the cabin and filtered, then mixed with fresh air and pumped back in. And airlines have imposed mask requirements even without a federal mandate.

Asked about the CDC’s numbers, Katherine Estep, a spokeswoman for the industry organization Airlines for America, emphasized that there are no documented cases of transmission involving U.S. flights.

“Flying remains a safe and healthy experience,” Estep said.

But though the CDC has not confirmed such transmissions domestically, new studies of flights in Asia and Europe have identified instances where scientists think the virus has spread on commercial flights — including one where passengers were wearing N95 masks, according to a paper published in a CDC journal. N95 masks, when worn correctly, are thought to offer some of the best protection against the virus.

Public health authorities in Britain recently ordered almost 200 passengers and crew into two weeks of quarantine after it was discovered that seven people traveling to Wales from the Greek island of Zante on Aug. 25 were infectious on the flight. Passengers told the BBC that boarding the plane was a free-for-all and that passengers were lax about wearing masks on the flight.

An analysis by the International Air Transport Association published in August identified four cases of possible transmission on aircraft. Among them was a March 2 flight from Britain to Vietnam on which one symptomatic passenger is likely to have transmitted the virus to 15 other people, according to a study published Friday in the CDC journal. Most of them were sitting close to the symptomatic passenger in business class, but people elsewhere on the plane also tested positive.

The study’s authors said their results challenge the airline industry’s safety claims, although they noted that the case dates to when wearing masks was not yet widespread.

“Our findings call for tightened screening and infection prevention measures by public health authorities, regulators, and the airline industry,” they wrote, calling for mandatory mask usage, good hand-washing hygiene and systematic testing and quarantining of arriving passengers.

Two other scientific studies also have identified likely cases of transmission. One of those studies, also published in the CDC journal, looked at an evacuation flight from Northern Italy, one of the first regions in Europe to be badly hit by the virus, to South Korea. The flight was closely monitored by Korean health authorities, and passengers were given N95 masks to wear.

But a team of Korean scientists reported that testing once the flight landed revealed that the plane had carried six asymptomatic passengers. On the eighth day after the flight landed, a 28-year-old woman began to feel ill and ultimately tested positive for the novel coronavirus.

The woman had been self-quarantining before the flight and was in quarantine after arriving in South Korea, leading the researchers to conclude that she contracted the virus on the plane, perhaps when she removed her mask while using the lavatory.

The research team acknowledged the role of the plane’s filters as a defense against the virus but said contaminated surfaces or the mingling of passengers during boarding could be opportunities for exposure.

“Our results suggest that stringent global regulations for the prevention of COVID-19 transmission on aircraft can prevent public health emergencies,” the scientists concluded. They recommended the use of masks, hand washing and social distancing while getting on and off planes.

Another study examined a flight from Israel to Germany carrying tourists who were exposed to a hotel manager who had the virus. Seven of them were carrying the virus when they boarded the plane, and the study concluded that it was most likely transmitted to two more people on board.

“Transmissions do occur, even though the air circulation in the cabin likely reduces the rate of transmission,” said Sandra Ciesek, a virologist at the University Hospital Frankfurt in Germany and one of the study’s authors.

People on the flight were not wearing masks, a factor that Ciesek said could have made a difference. She pointed to another study, in which she was involved, concerning an evacuation flight from China to Germany with sick passengers. Those passengers wore masks, Ciesek said, and there were no cases of transmission.

Although the studies suggest transmission is possible on planes, Joshua Santarpia, a microbiologist and pathologist at the University of Nebraska who was not involved in the studies, said that if the same groups of people were put in other enclosed spaces for several hours, he would expect to see many more people falling ill.

“If I were to pick between going into a crowded bar or getting on the airplane, I’d get on the plane any day,” said Santarpia, who said he has flown about two dozen times for work during the pandemic and took a plane trip with his son.

Convincing travelers that they will be safe on board has been a top priority for the airline industry, which has been among the hardest hit during the pandemic, with passenger numbers plummeting more than 95 percent. Passengers have slowly been returning, but the industry remains on its heels, warning of tens of thousands of furloughs and layoffs this fall.

Aviation companies are backing their own research to better understand the potential risks.

In August, an arm of the Defense Department that organizes commercial flights for military members, their families and contractors worked with Boeing and United Airlines to gather data on how the virus moves inside planes. The tests, conducted at Washington Dulles International Airport, involved the release of aerosol particles among mannequins simulating passengers. Santarpia is working on the study, which is expected to report results in October.

This month, Harvard’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health announced the launch of an aviation industry-sponsored study on the risks of flying. Airlines have adopted new cleaning technologies and imposed some of the strictest mask requirements in the country, banning hundreds of passengers who have refused to comply.

But the measures are not perfect — stories of passengers refusing to don masks regularly circulate on social media — and scientists have long understood the potential for viruses to spread in aircraft cabins even with air filtration systems.

‘I had to get home’

Airlines also have no way to prevent people who are infected but asymptomatic from flying. And Kayleigh Blaney, an epidemiologist for Oakland County in the Detroit area, said people report flying despite having symptoms of covid-19 — the disease caused by the novel coronavirus — telling contact tracers: “Well, I got sick while I was here and I had to get home.”

Labor unions and Democrats in Congress continue to press for more safety measures. Carome, of Public Citizen, said the aviation industry could explore such options as temperature screenings and rapid testing, something airlines are interested in doing as trials as a way of restarting international travel.

Officials at state and county health departments said that, like the CDC, they’re regularly documenting cases of people flying while capable of spreading the virus.

When local officials find a case, they typically share the information with their state’s health authorities, and then the CDC coordinates with airlines to determine the identities of people who potentially have been exposed. The CDC’s rules for determining exposure have evolved along with its understanding of the virus but include people sitting within six feet of a reported case or all passengers on flights without assigned seating.

Contact information is then passed back down the chain, but sometimes it is incomplete or out of date.

In 2018 and 2019, the CDC investigated about 150 cases of pathogens such as the measles virus and tuberculosis bacteria spreading on planes. Shockey, the CDC spokeswoman, said the team that handles those cases has been expanded to handle the increased workload of tracking coronavirus cases.

“This is an unprecedented disease outbreak response, and the team has been expanded and are working tirelessly to meet the demands,” she said.

The relationship between airlines and the CDC has long been contentious. Early in the coronavirus outbreak, there was a dispute over a proposal to require better passenger contact information to be collected for international flights. The industry proposed developing an app that it would hand over to the government, but no final agreement has been reached despite the White House taking up the issue.

Judd Deere, a spokesman for President Trump, said the administration “continues to work with the airlines on the best solution to protect the health and safety of the public not only during this ongoing pandemic but for future ones as well.”

Most state and local health departments did not provide numbers on cases linked to air travel, with some saying they weren’t systematically tracking them. The 500 cases The Post did document came from three counties, two states and D.C., and in some of the cases, the numbers represented cases for only a few weeks. In Utah, the Salt Lake County health department alone has counted 275. Others said that even if they couldn’t supply numbers, they regularly learned of cases of infection where people reported having traveled by air.

Air travel played a major role in spreading the virus around the world and the United States, but some health officials still say they consider exposure on planes a relatively minor risk. The acting state epidemiologist in Louisiana, Theresa Sokol, said officials there have not identified any coronavirus clusters involving air travel. In contrast, 41 outbreaks in the state have been ascribed to bars, 41 to restaurants and 25 to day-care centers.

The Vermont Health Department likewise said no one in the state who the CDC reported to have been exposed on a plane has become a coronavirus case.

Blaney, the Oakland County epidemiologist, said she also was not aware of any plane exposures turning into positive cases.

“I’m exponentially more concerned with all the graduation parties, the fraternity and sorority parties happening on college campuses than I am with flying,” Blaney said.

But she advised people who fly to be vigilant about keeping their masks on and understanding airlines’ safety protocols.

“A lot of it has to do with how safe you’re being while you’re flying,” Blaney said.

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Least People

At Least 7 People Killed In West Coast Wildfires; Dangerous Winds Forecast To Ease – NPR

Firefighters cut defensive lines and light backfires to protect structures behind a Cal Fire fire station at the Bear Fire, part of the North Lightning Complex of fires in the Berry Creek area of Butte County, Calif., on Wednesday.

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Firefighters cut defensive lines and light backfires to protect structures behind a Cal Fire fire station at the Bear Fire, part of the North Lightning Complex of fires in the Berry Creek area of Butte County, Calif., on Wednesday.

Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images

At least seven people have died in wildfires that are raging in Oregon, California and Washington state, adding to the horrible toll from record-setting fires in 2020.

“This could be the greatest loss of human lives and property due to wildfires in our state’s history,” Oregon Gov. Kate Brown said.

Large parts of the West Coast were under warnings for elevated fire weather threats Thursday, but there could soon be a measure of relief as forecasts call for a decrease in fire-driving winds.

“The strong, gusty winds over the West are expected to weaken by the weekend,” the National Weather Service says. Even so, the agency adds, high temperatures and low humidity will still pose a threat.

The seven confirmed deaths are three people in Oregon, three in California and one in Washington state.

The Almeda Drive Fire in southern Oregon, which devastated the towns of Phoenix and Talent, caused at least one death, Jackson County Sheriff Nate Sickler said. The body was found near the fire’s point of origin and “the cause of death is under criminal investigation,” Jefferson Public Radio reports.

Two other people died in Marion County, “where a complex of fires has burned whole canyons east of the Willamette River,” Oregon Public Broadcasting reports. Those victims were a boy, 13, and his grandmother, the Salem Statesman Journal reports. The boy’s mother is in critical condition at a Portland hospital, the newspaper says.

Vehicles were destroyed by a wildfire in Malden, Wash., on Tuesday. Large parts of the West Coast are under warnings for elevated fire weather threats Thursday, but there may be relief if fire-driving winds decrease as expected.

Jed Conklin/AP


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Vehicles were destroyed by a wildfire in Malden, Wash., on Tuesday. Large parts of the West Coast are under warnings for elevated fire weather threats Thursday, but there may be relief if fire-driving winds decrease as expected.

Jed Conklin/AP

A 1-year-old died in the Cold Springs Fire in northern Washington state, Public Lands Commissioner Hilary Franz said in a statement. The boy was killed as his family tried to reach safer ground, according to KXLY-TV. His parents were reportedly hospitalized with severe burns.

'I Heard Popping And Houses Blowing Up': Deadly Wildfires Rage On West Coast

In California, three people died as the fast-growing Bear Fire forced thousands of people to evacuate their homes in Yuba and Butte counties, according to Capital Public Radio. Local officials did not offer details about those deaths when they initially announced them.

Evacuation orders include part of Paradise – the community devastated by the Camp Fire in 2018. Nearby residents say they’re vividly recalling that tragedy this week.

“People said, ‘Oh, our tires were melting, you know, and just scared to death and getting burned,’ ” Pamela Newton tells Capital Public Radio. “And that’s all I could think about.”

Butte County firefighters watch as flames quickly spread across a road at the Bear Fire in Oroville, Calif., on Wednesday. The local sheriff says three people died as a result of fires in the area.

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Butte County firefighters watch as flames quickly spread across a road at the Bear Fire in Oroville, Calif., on Wednesday. The local sheriff says three people died as a result of fires in the area.

Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images

Other people who live near Lake Oroville described fleeing the small town of Berry Creek in the middle of the night, driving through a corridor of burning houses as ash rained down from the sky. Before they left, many of them tried to give their homes a chance to survive.

“I left the sprinklers on the roof when I left,” Ron Elms tells Capital Public Radio. “I left the generator on. I did everything I could to save it. So we’ll just see.”

California has already seen more than 2.5 million acres burn this year — a record dating back at least three decades to when the state started tracking the statistic. In a normal season, an average of 300,000 acres would likely burn.

This year’s fire season has already hit the record books, with more acres burning in 2020 than any other year in the past 3 decades (since statewide figures have been tracked). 2020 has already taken the number one spot for acres burned and there are still several months to go. pic.twitter.com/hgI7Vw0clS

— CAL FIRE (@CAL_FIRE) September 9, 2020

According to the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, or Cal Fire, “2020 has already taken the number one spot for acres burned and there are still several months to go” in the fire season.

Wildfires in Oregon and Washington have burned more than 900,000 acres, the Bureau of Land Management said.

Patricia Fouts sits with her dog, Murphy, and other evacuated residents of a senior living home in an evacuation center at the Oregon State Fairgrounds in Salem, Ore., on Tuesday. Marian Estates senior living home in Sublimity, Ore., was evacuated early Tuesday as a wildfire closed in on the area.

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Patricia Fouts sits with her dog, Murphy, and other evacuated residents of a senior living home in an evacuation center at the Oregon State Fairgrounds in Salem, Ore., on Tuesday. Marian Estates senior living home in Sublimity, Ore., was evacuated early Tuesday as a wildfire closed in on the area.

Andrew Selsky/AP

Two new large fires have emerged in Oregon, the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center said in its update Thursday morning, adding to the misery in an area that also saw “significant growth” among the fires already burning in western Oregon’s valleys.

Gov. Brown has asked President Trump to approve her request for a major disaster declaration for Oregon.

A smoky haze blanketed San Francisco on Wednesday. California has already seen more than 2.5 million acres burn this year.

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A smoky haze blanketed San Francisco on Wednesday. California has already seen more than 2.5 million acres burn this year.

Brittany Hosea-Small/AFP via Getty Images

Dozens of unpredictable and large fires over such a large geographic area has strained firefighting resources. While some neighboring states have pitched in to help, the effort has become international.

“Federal fire managers say Canadian and Mexican fire crews are now helping out on the West Coast,” NPR’s Kirk Siegler reports. “And the agency is requesting more help in the form of 10 hand crews from the U.S. military.”

Those crews might get a break if the winds drop, which would be welcome news along the coast but less so in inland areas — as the massive banks of smoke that have accrued along the Pacific coast would start to move eastward.

A low-level wind pattern has been driving smoke to the west for several days, blanketing cities such as Seattle and San Francisco with an eerie, orange haze. As the wind direction shifts, “smoke from the wildfires may waft and settle inland,” the NWS says.

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2 cops hurt, 8 people arrested at Rochester protest over Daniel Prude’s death – New York Post

September 4, 2020 | 8:06am | Updated September 4, 2020 | 10:55am

Two Rochester cops were injured and eight people arrested early Friday after a protest by over 200 demonstrators demanding justice for Daniel Prude — who suffocated while in police custody — descended into chaos, including arson, vandalism and looting, according to a report.

The eight protesters — men and women ranging in age from 24 to 60 — were charged with disorderly conduct, a violation, police Capt. Michael Callari said, according to the Democrat and Chronicle.

Two of them also were charged with resisting arrest, a misdemeanor, and one was charged with harassment, he added.

The large crowd descended on the Public Safety Building, where some of the people pelted police officers with rocks and bottles, the news outlet reported. The injured cops were treated at a local hospital and released.

The mayhem unfolded after Mayor Lovely Warren said late Thursday that she was suspending all seven cops involved in Prude’s case, adding she did so “against the advice of counsel.”

Prude, 41, was seen on police bodycam video naked and in distress on March 23 when he was confronted by police.

The officers — who are heard laughing through parts of the video — handcuff Prude and put a spit mask over his head, with one cop holding his head down until he stops moving. He was declared brain-dead and died one week later.

During the protests Thursday night into Friday, Rochester and state police in riot gear fired pepper balls as they pushed back demonstrators in shorts, jeans and T-shirts — some shielding themselves with umbrellas.

The police action drew criticism from at least one city council member as “unnecessarily aggressive,” according to the Democrat and Chronicle.

“It’s clear that City Council’s request for a respectful, de-escalated interaction with protesters went unheeded,” Mitch Gruber said in a text message to a reporter.

“RPD initiated unnecessarily aggressive behavior toward peaceful protesters,” he added. “By morning I expect to hear from the mayor and chief as to why our requests weren’t met and how they will appropriately address continued, sustained peaceful protest.”

The city council asked Warren in a letter Thursday that police “meet these protests with respect and to de-escalate tension. We do not need any militaristic outfitting and use of pepper balls at this incredibly sensitive time for our community.”

In front of the barricaded police department Thursday night, the protesters chanted, “Black lives matter” and “What do we want? Justice. When do we want it? Now.”

Release Of Police Video Of Daniel Prude's Detainment Sparks Protests In Rochester, New York

Police officers use pepper spray to disperse protesters in Rochester yesterday.

Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

Release Of Police Video Of Daniel Prude's Detainment Sparks Protests In Rochester, New York

Demonstrators shield themselves from pepper spray during a protest in Rochester.

Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

Release Of Police Video Of Daniel Prude's Detainment Sparks Protests In Rochester, New York

A demonstrator uses a traffic barrel as a shield against pepper spray.

Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

Release Of Police Video Of Daniel Prude's Detainment Sparks Protests In Rochester, New York

Demonstrators lean out of their cars as they join a march to the Rochester police station.

Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

Release Of Police Video Of Daniel Prude's Detainment Sparks Protests In Rochester, New York

Demonstrators march toward the Rochester police station.

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Release Of Police Video Of Daniel Prude's Detainment Sparks Protests In Rochester, New York

Demonstrators at the site of Daniel Prude’s arrest in Rochester yesterday

Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

Release Of Police Video Of Daniel Prude's Detainment Sparks Protests In Rochester, New York

Demonstrators at the site of Daniel Prude’s arrest in Rochester yesterday

Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

Release Of Police Video Of Daniel Prude's Detainment Sparks Protests In Rochester, New York

Demonstrators at the site of Daniel Prude’s arrest in Rochester yesterday

Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

Release Of Police Video Of Daniel Prude's Detainment Sparks Protests In Rochester, New York

Demonstrators face off with police officers in Rochester yesterday.

Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

Release Of Police Video Of Daniel Prude's Detainment Sparks Protests In Rochester, New York

A demonstrator raises her fist as she kneels in front of police officers during a protest in Rochester.

Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

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Swift’s reps slam it as “a money grab.”

Shortly before 10:30 p.m., police began firing volleys of pepper balls as the crowds retreated south toward Corn Hill.

“You aren’t no one without a badge!” some chanted a little after 11:30 p.m., shortly before police began advancing with shields in an effort to clear the crowd.

But the protesters resisted the challenge by locking arms as drums thumped loudly. “Say his name!” they chanted. “Daniel Prude!”

Meanwhile, several groups under the Black Lives Matter movement called for the resignation of both Warren and Police Chief La’Ron Singletary, saying they can no longer put their trust in the two leaders, WHEC reported.

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People three

Three people fatally shot over three hours as shootings surge in NYC – New York Post

September 3, 2020 | 9:55am | Updated September 3, 2020 | 10:57am

Three people were gunned down in a less than a three-hour span Wednesday night into Thursday — as the epidemic of gun violence across New York City shows no signs of abating.

The first fatal shooting broke out just before 8:45 p.m. in Flatbush outside 75 Martense St., where a 20-year-old man was shot in the face, police said.

The man, whose name was not released, was rushed to Kings County Hospital by friends, but died shortly after, according to police.

Moments later, inside the Amsterdam Houses on the Upper West Side, a 44-year-old man was shot multiple times, police said.

Cedric Bennett was taken to Mount Sinai West Hospital, but could not be saved.

Less than two hours later, an unidentified victim was found shot multiple times at West 175 Street and Saint Nicholas Avenue in Washington Heights, cops said.

EMS rushed the man to NYC Health & Hospitals/Harlem, where he died, according to police.

The trio of fatal shootings capped off another bloody day in the Big Apple with seven shootings and seven victims.

On the same day in 2019, police recorded one more shooting and four more shooting victims — but Sept. 2 last year was Labor Day, historically one of the more violent days of the year in the city.

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People telling

USPS is telling people their mail is being held ‘at the request of the customer.’ It isn’t true. – The Washington Post

U.S. Postal Service customers across the country have been receiving a notification that often alarms and perplexes them: The message says packages they expected delivered to their home or business are being held at a post office “at the request of the customer.”

But customers who are receiving these notifications never requested that their mail be held.

The packages are delayed because of broad changes Postmaster General Louis DeJoy has implemented to the nation’s mail delivery operations, including policies that slow down package delivery. When a mail carrier cannot deliver a package on the day it was scheduled because their shift is ending, postal workers say, the system sometimes generates a misleading “held at the request of the customer” message.

Although the reality is that the mail carrier will deliver the package, sometimes the next day, customers say the message has prompted them to visit the post office to claim their items — even if they are concerned about venturing out because of the coronavirus pandemic — and has undermined their faith in mail delivery leading up to the 2020 election.

“Shouldn’t it say that the carrier couldn’t deliver it today because time ran out? … The message is incorrect,” said Jamaal Vetose of Baltimore County, who had lost his mask and visited the post office without it to pick up his package containing a new one after receiving the erroneous notification.

Postal Service spokespeople did not answer questions from The Washington Post about why customers are getting this message. One spokesman said he could not answer without seeing the tracking numbers. When The Post provided tracking numbers from two packages, the Postal Service did not respond.

Vetose, who works for an investment firm, teleworks most of the week but goes to the office on Mondays. He was anxiously tracking a mask that was supposed to be delivered on a Friday.

Late Friday evening, he saw the message saying his package was being held at his request. “I’m not sure if the carrier ran out of time, or to be honest they decided they didn’t want to deliver it,” he said. “I definitely didn’t request them to hold it.”

He lined up at his local post office first thing Saturday morning, ashamed of the looks that he got from fellow customers when they saw he wasn’t wearing a mask. “I’m here to pick the mask up. It was supposed to be delivered to my house,” he told a few people in explanation.

Vetose said the USPS employee at the counter told him that he need not have come — the carrier would probably have delivered the mask later that day.

Postal employees in D.C., Maryland and California all told The Post or have told their customers that those who receive the notification do not need to come to the post office in person.

DeJoy, whose cost-cutting measures have provoked congressional hearings and the threat of a lawsuit by more than 20 states against the Postal Service, has said the changes are needed to fix the struggling mail delivery system.

Democrats say the rapidly implemented measures could make it difficult to deliver mail-in ballots to voters this November.

Under pressure, DeJoy has pledged to prioritize ballot delivery and agreed to hold off on some changes until after the election. But others remain in place — including strict schedules for trucks and mail carriers to set off on their routes, even if mail is running late or hasn’t been sorted yet. DeJoy told members of Congress that he would not reverse his ban on extra trips to deliver more mail, and hundreds of mail sorting machines that have been removed will not be reinstalled.

But most customers don’t know the cause of the delays. All they know is that their mail is taking longer — and packages are apparently being held.

When Missy Metcalf of Soquel, Calif., received one of the erroneous notifications, she went to her post office three days in a row — even though she lives with her immunocompromised boyfriend and has mostly stayed home during the pandemic for his protection. She even bought a second refrigerator so she wouldn’t have to go to the grocery store often.

Hoping for a treat to relieve the boredom of long months cooped up inside, Metcalf ordered about $250 worth of makeup online. When she was told her expensive purchase was being held at the post office, she reluctantly went to get it.

At the counter, “The guy shrugged it off and said, ‘That just means he probably didn’t want to deliver it,’ ” Metcalf said. She came back the next day, and the day after that, again in vain. Finally, the package arrived in her mailbox.

“Obviously there are lies being told to me,” she said.

Some customers who have received the notifications say that the experience has changed how they will use the mail system going forward. Lauren Fant, a high school teacher in Davenport, Fla., said she had been encouraging her friends for months to vote by mail in this year’s elections. But then she ordered a bevy of items online, including cleaning supplies for her classroom before going back to school. And twice, she got a notification that her packages were being held.

Florida’s primary was held last week, and Fant decided she didn’t trust the mail after all. “I was afraid my ballot wasn’t going to get counted. I don’t want to seem like a conspiracy theorist, but maybe I shouldn’t be telling people to vote by mail,” she said.

Her asthma has been troubling her lately and she’s worried about coronavirus, but she voted in person anyway.

And she made one more trip: She normally orders her asthma medication by mail, but she was concerned it would be delayed, too. “What if I need my inhaler and it doesn’t show up? All these stupid scenarios that shouldn’t even be a worry went through my head,” she said.

Pandemic or not, she didn’t want to entrust a package to the Postal Service again. She went to the pharmacy in person.

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Two people are dead and a third injured after an overnight shooting in Kenosha, police say – CNN

(CNN)Two people were killed and a third was seriously wounded in a shooting in Kenosha, Wisconsin, late Tuesday during the third night of protests over the police shooting of Jacob Blake, police said.

Officers responded to reports of multiple gunshot victims around 11:45 p.m. Tuesday, the Kenosha Police Department said in a news release early Wednesday.
The person injured was taken to the hospital with “serious, but non-life threatening injuries,” police said.
An investigation into the shooting is ongoing and the names and ages of the victims are still being determined, according to the release.
Kenosha County Sheriff David Beth told The New York Times his office is investigating whether the shooting resulted from a conflict between demonstrators and a group of men with weapons who were protecting businesses.
CNN has reached out to the Kenosha Police Department and the Kenosha County Sheriff’s Office.
The protests come days after police shot Blake, a 29-year-old Black man, multiple times as he tried to enter an SUV with his children in the back.
Ben Crump, the civil rights attorney who represents the family, said police shot Blake after he had tried to break up an argument between two women. Police have not provided any information on what led up to the shooting.
Two Kenosha officers have been placed on administrative leave. The shooting is being investigated by the Kenosha County District Attorney Michael Graveley’s office and the Wisconsin Justice Department’s division of criminal investigation, which plans to present a report to Graveley’s office within 30 days, it said.
Wisconsin’s governor declared a state of emergency Tuesday after cars and buildings were set ablaze and called in 250 members of the National Guard to assist. Blake remains in the hospital but his family says he is paralyzed from the waist down. A family attorney said it would take a “miracle” for Blake to ever walk again.

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Bondi on Biden’s political career: ‘The people who benefited are his family members, not the American people’ – Fox News

Former Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi went on offense in her Republican Convention address, focusing on the Biden family and the political ties she says they benefited from.

“Our party’s theme tonight is ‘America — the land of opportunity,’” Bondi said. “But for Joe Biden, it’s been the land of opportunism, not opportunity.”

The Democrats told the American people to look Joe Biden as the model of integrity, she said.

“But, when you look at his 47-year career in politics, the people who benefited are his family members, not the American people,” the Florida prosecutor continued.

She first pointed to Joe Biden’s son Hunter and his ties to Ukraine. Biden was placed on the board of Ukrainian gas company Burisma while his father was vice president, despite having no natural gas experience and not speaking the language.

“Yet he was paid millions to do nothing,” Bondi said. “He only had one qualification that mattered: He was the son of the man in charge of distributing U.S. aid to Ukraine.”

PAUL: VOTE TRUMP IF YOU HATE WAR LIKE I DO 

Bondi noted that Biden pressured Ukraine to fire prosecutor Victor Shokin who was investigating that energy company, though some say Shokin was forced out for failing to investigate the nation’s politicians.

“Hunter only resigned from that board … just before his dad announced his campaign for president,” she said.

Earlier this year, Bondi served on the president’s legal team during the impeachment trial, which grew out of the president’s efforts to convince Ukrainian officials to investigate Hunter Biden’s business dealings in the country.

Bondi also called to mind Biden and his son Hunter’s trip to China aboard Air Force 2, where Hunter Biden met with Chinese investors who 10 days later approved millions for Hunter’s firm.

“Those bankers work for the Chinese Communist Party, which oppresses their people, cheated American workers for decades, and covered up a deadly virus,” Bondi said. “To this day, Hunter controls a 10% stake in that firm.”

She said Joe Biden has done more than look the other way on China.

“He’s said, ‘The Chinese aren’t our competition.’ ‘Come on man, they’re not bad folks,’” Bondi continued. “Come on, Joe. Talk to the folks in middle America who lost countless jobs to China while your son was getting rich with them.”

Bondi also pointed to another deal where a construction firm belonging to Biden’s brother James, HillStone, then a newcomer to the business of home building, secured a contract to build 100,000 homes in war-torn Iraq. Bondi noted that a company official reportedly said it helps to have “the brother of the vice president as a partner.”

“These aren’t isolated incidents, it’s a deliberate pattern of conduct,” said Bondi. “And that’s just what he did as vice president. Imagine what he’d do as president.”

She mocked one of the former vice president’s slogans.

“Joe says he will build back better,” she said. “Yeah, build the Bidens back better.”

Biden has repeatedly denied any wrongdoing related to his son’s business dealings.

TRUMP ANNOUNCES PARDON OF JON PONDER AS PART OF GOP CONVENTION APPEARANCE

Bondi served as Florida’s AG between 2011 and 2019, and was one of Trump’s early supporters the first time around.

At the 2016 GOP convention, she famously gave a speech in which she encouraged “Lock Her Up” chants directed at Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton.

“Lock her up, I love that,” Bondi said to an audience member holding a sign.

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After serving as attorney general, Bondi headed the lobbying firm Ballard Partners’ regulatory compliance office. The firm, headed by Brian Ballard, has close ties to President Trump.

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1 in 4 young people are reporting suicidal thoughts. Here’s how to help – CNN

(CNN)In the early days of the pandemic, many people came together to help each other, connecting over socially distant dinners and reaching out for video calls with friends they hadn’t talked to in months.

But this international crisis continues, and Americans are having trouble adjusting to the strain of our new reality.
New psychological data taken during the pandemic shows the nation’s mental health is languishing, according to data reported this week as part of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.
Suicidal ideation is up among young people since last year, with as many as one in four people ages 18 through 24 having seriously considered suicide in the 30 days preceding the survey, according to the report, in which researchers surveyed 5,412 adults in the US between June 24 and 30.
In the general US population, the CDC reported that 11% of adults surveyed had seriously considered suicide in the past 30 days before they completed the survey. Among those identifying as Black or Hispanic, the numbers were worse: 19% of Hispanics reported suicidal ideation and 15% of Blacks reported suicidal thoughts.
The results reflect a nation increasingly on edge. The number of Americans reporting anxiety symptoms is three times the number at this same time last year, the CDC said.

The pandemic is a new type of challenge

“Previous events have had a start, middle, an end,” said Vaile Wright, senior director of health care innovation for the American Psychological Association. “People can’t disconnect from this.”
Unlike events such as 9/11 or hurricanes, the coronavirus pandemic isn’t just something people watch on the news, limited to a specific time and place. It’s everywhere, and it doesn’t appear to have an end date.
“Nobody is immune to the stress of the pandemic,” Wright said.
Add on the pressures of the economy, the increased scrutiny on racial injustice and the looming specter of the presidential election, and it’s hard for many to feel like things might turn out OK.
The emotional burden is falling more heavily on those who reported having been treated recently for mental or emotional issues, the CDC report stated. In particular, the stress is disproportionately falling on the young.
“We’re consistently hearing that young people are struggling and having a tough time,” she said.

There are ways to seek help

On an individual level, Wright noted that the main pillars of psychological health include eating healthy, staying active, getting enough sleep and maintaining social connections.
“Oftentimes when we’re in stress, it’s hard to come up with a game plan,” she said. “Friends and family play that role.”
But figuring out healthy ways to socialize virtually can require being intentional. Passive thumbing through social media or “doom scrolling” doesn’t constitute meaningful or supportive social interaction, Wright said.
If you’re on social media it’s better to try to directly engage with or respond to others, she said. In particular, if someone you know or love stops engaging, that can be a sign that it’s time to reach out.
“You can say things like ‘I’m worried about you,’ and ask if they’re eating, sleeping and taking care of themselves,” Wright said.
You can encourage them to seek professional help from a therapist or counselor. That process is actually now a little easier during the pandemic, Wright explained, citing APA data that 75% of mental health providers have switched over to telehealth.
“Providers are available, and we know teletherapy to be effective,” she said.
The National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention recommends that those needing emotional support related to Covid-19 should call the Disaster Distress Helpline (800-985-5990), or text TalkWithUs to 66746.
And if you’re experiencing a suicidal crisis, you can call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800-273-8255 or text the Crisis Text line by texting HOME to 741741 to get help.
Even if you’re not in crisis, it’s crucial to find ways, albeit often virtually or physically distanced, Wright said, to maintain bonds with others and do what we can to support each other before someone enters into a crisis mode.
Many were doing that well in the spring as the nation entered into the pandemic, she felt. And the nation’s mental health now requires us to recall that same spirit.
“As a community, we need to collectively re-amp up,” Wright said.

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