Categories
Photos PlayStation

Live PlayStation 5 photos reveal a truly giant console – Engadget

Sony’s PlayStation 5 hasn’t really appeared in live photos, making it difficult to gauge the size of the console. However, the game console has finally made a real-world appearance in a filing at Taiwan’s NCC (via The Verge) — and it’s clear the PS5 isn’t meant for small cabinets. While Sony hasn’t been shy about mentioning the PS5’s 15.4-inch length (or height), 10.2-inch depth and 4.1-inch thickness, the NCC’s photos put those dimensions into context. You’ll have to make room for this beast, whether you’re buying the Digital Edition or the disc-based model.

As we pointed out in our specs comparison, this should be the largest console to date. It’s much larger overall than the Xbox Series X (if not as thick), and still bigger than legendary behemoths like the original PlayStation 3, the first Xbox, and the Xbox One. Sony also hasn’t included the stand or the “largest projection” of the PS5’s body into its figures.

Read More

Categories
Photos viral

Viral Photos Showing Ominous Orange Skies in San Francisco Maybe Result of California Wildfires – News18

Image Credits: Twitter/@OdorousObject/@PkBohan.

Image Credits: Twitter/@OdorousObject/@PkBohan.

What were being described as “unprecedented” wildfires, fueled by strong winds and searing temperatures, were raging cross a wide swathe of California, Oregon and Washington on Wednesday, destroying scores of homes and businesses in the western US states and forcing tens of thousands of residents to evacuate.

  • News18.com
  • Last Updated: September 10, 2020, 6:38 PM IST
  • FOLLOW US ON:

2020 has been quite a year: A global pandemic, wilfires, the glaciers melting…and it doesn’t seem to end.

Residents of San Francisco and elsewhere in California woke Wednesday to a deep orange sky that triggered apocalyptic visions in a year already rife with disturbing events.

Skies so dark at times that it appeared more night than day were accompanied in some places with ash falling like snow, the cause being massive wild fires filling the air with smoke and cinders.

“The orange skies this morning are a result of wildfire smoke in the air,” San Francisco Bay air quality officials said in a tweet.

“These smoke particles scatter blue light and only allow yellow-orange-red light to reach the surface, causing skies to look orange.”

As smoke gets thick in some areas, it blocks sunlight causing dark skies, the officials explained.

Photos of the eerie scene, particularly of a San Francisco skyline fit for a dystopian science fiction film, spread quickly on social media.

“Is there a word for ‘the apocalypse is upon us burnt sienna?’ read one tweet fired off by someone who felt using the word ‘orange’ to describe the sky was being too kind.

Others likened the scenes to planets other than Earth.

“If literal fire skies don’t wake us up to climate change, then nothing will,” tweeted YouTube influencer and Zadiko tea startup chief Zack Kornfeld.

“Enjoy joking about how crazy this year is because we made this mess and it’s only going to get worse.”

Strange and foreboding orange skies and a layer of falling ash greeted Bay Area residents as they woke on Wednesday, rubbing their eyes and wondering if they’d awoken on a different planet — and pondering just how long the daylight dimness would last. https://t.co/VoXXF6FMw1 pic.twitter.com/KdbcD099PF

— San Francisco Chronicle (@sfchronicle) September 9, 2020

Absolutely no filter involved here. This is the morning sky over San Francisco at 8am. Orange, dark and ashy bc of wildfires. I was two days away from my 8th birthday when Mt. St. Helens shook the planet. I’m from Seattle-Tacoma and i remember the sky looked just like this. pic.twitter.com/zgOkT2Ou5f

— Will Tran (@KRON4WTran) September 9, 2020

San Francisco today. The sky is dark with ash from fires, and the wind stagnated, so everywhere it’s a red orange light.

This was taken just minutes ago, it’s noon here pic.twitter.com/EcngJzhxBw

— OdorousObject (@OdorousObject) September 9, 2020

Dark skies blocking the sun chilled temperatures at what has historically been the warmest time year in San Francisco.

“Geo-color imagery shows a very thick multilevel smoke deck over much of California,” the US National Weather Service said in a tweet.

“This smoke is filtering the incoming energy from the sun, causing much cooler temperatures and dark dreary red-shifted skies across many areas.”

What were being described as “unprecedented” wildfires, fueled by strong winds and searing temperatures, were raging cross a wide swathe of California, Oregon and Washington on Wednesday, destroying scores of homes and businesses in the western US states and forcing tens of thousands of residents to evacuate.

In California, where at least eight deaths have been reported, National Guard helicopters rescued hundreds of people trapped by the Creek Fire in the Sierra National Forest.

In Oregon, Governor Kate Brown declared the fires in the northwestern state to be a “once-in-a-generation event.”

Jay Inslee, the governor of neighboring Washington state, described the wildfires as “unprecedented and heartbreaking.”

Inslee, who campaigned for the Democratic nomination for president on a platform of battling climate change, and California Governor Gavin Newsom both blamed the effects of a changing climate for the exceptional ferocity of this year’s blazes.

“I quite literally have no patience for climate change deniers,” Newsom said. “It’s completely inconsistent, that point of view, with the reality on the ground.”

(With inputs from AFP)

Read More

Categories
First Photos

The first photos of Tom Brady in his Buccaneers uniform are here and they’re as jarring as you’d expect – CNN

(CNN)Patriot fans, you may want to look away.

Tom Brady, the former beloved quarterback of the New England team, has officially traded in the Patriots blue and white for his new colors of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers.
On Tuesday, the Buccaneers unveiled the first photos of Brady in his new uniform. And because one photo wasn’t enough to rub it into New England’s face, the football team revealed a total of 41 pictures — of Brady in his away and home uniforms in many different poses.
The six-time Super Bowl winner, who spent 20 seasons with the Patriots, signed with the Buccaneers back in March.
“Excited, humble and hungry … if there is one thing I have learned about football, it’s that nobody cares what you did last year or the year before that …you earn the trust and respect of those around through your commitment every single day,” the 42-year-old quarterback wrote on Instagram at the time. “I’m starting a new football journey and thankful for the Buccaneers for giving me an opportunity to do what I love to do.”
Buccaneer fans and Brady’s new teammates shared their excitement at the sight of him in the uniform.
“Grew up a @TomBrady fan! Now I actually get to be his teammate! Just hold your side down bro, I got the D Block,” linebacker Devin White tweeted.
But Patriots’ fans were obviously upset at the fresh reminder that they were losing the six-time Super Bowl winner who is widely regarded as the greatest NFL quarterback in history.
“I refuse to accept Tom Brady in any other uniform. I’m delusional and I don’t care,” one Patriots fan tweeted.
The first time the world will get to see Brady donning his new threads in a game setting is on August 14 when the Bucs go against the Pittsburgh Steelers in the preseason opener. The Bucs’ first prime-time appearance will be against the Chicago Bears at Soldier Field on October 8.

Read More

Categories
Photos SpaceX's

Photos: SpaceX’s first crewed mission launches from pad 39A – Spaceflight Now

June 10, 2020
Stephen Clark


If you would like to see more articles like this please support our coverage of the space program by becoming a Spaceflight Now Member. If everyone who enjoys our website helps fund it, we can expand and improve our coverage further.


This collection of images from NASA and SpaceX photographers shows the Crew Dragon spacecraft lifting off on top of a Falcon 9 rocket May 30.

Taking advantage of a break in the weather, the 215-foot-tall (65-meter) Falcon 9 rocket took off from the Kennedy Space Center at 3:22:45 p.m. EDT (1922:45 GMT) on May 30. Around 12 minutes later, the Falcon 9’s upper stage deployed the Crew Dragon spaceship into orbit.

The launch marked the first time astronauts have flown into orbit from a U.S. spaceport since the last launch of NASA’s space shuttle program July 8, 2011.

These photos show the Falcon 9 launching atop nine Merlin 1D engines, each consuming kerosene and liquid oxygen propellants, producing a combined 1.7 million pounds of thrust. The final photo in the series shows the Falcon 9’s first stage booster landing on SpaceX’s drone ship “Of Course I Still Love You” in the Atlantic Ocean for potential reuse on a future mission.

Credit: SpaceX
Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls
Credit: NASA/Joel Kowsky
Credit: NASA/Joel Kowsky
Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls
Credit: NASA/Joel Kowsky
Credit: NASA/Joel Kowsky
Credit: SpaceX
Credit: SpaceX
Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls & Joel Kowsky
Credit: SpaceX
Credit: NASA/Joel Kowsky
Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls
Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls
Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls
Credit: SpaceX
Credit: SpaceX
Credit: SpaceX

Email the author.

Follow Stephen Clark on Twitter: @StephenClark1.


If you would like to see more articles like this please support our coverage of the space program by becoming a Spaceflight Now Member. If everyone who enjoys our website helps fund it, we can expand and improve our coverage further.


Related Articles

Read More

Categories
Photos space

Space Photos of the Week: Keeping an Eye on Jupiter’s Storms – WIRED

Jupiter has one of the most bizarre atmospheres in the entire solar system. Gas giants like Jupiter are believed to have some kind of semi-solid core, but are mostly made of gas like hydrogen, helium, and ammonia. The planet is also the fastest spinning orb in the solar system, which creates a lot of turbulence and some very complex storm systems. And for the past few years, NASA’s Juno spacecraft has been orbiting the planet to keep a close eye on Jupiter’s behavior. NASA, by the way, sourced the name from a Greek myth: Jupiter, king of the gods, was a philanderer and whenever he brought another woman back to his lair he’d hide his activity by engulfing himself with a thick layer of clouds. Too bad for him he didn’t realize that his wife, Juno, had the ability to see through the clouds. Joke’s on you Jupiter!

Earlier this month, NASA announced that two telescopes, the Hubble Space Telescope and the ground-based Gemini telescope, will partner up with the Juno craft to help scientists get an even more comprehensive look at the planet. Researchers want to understand how Jupiter’s atmosphere works, and the best way to do this is by viewing it through different wavelength filters. Fortunately both the Hubble Space Telescope and Gemini have the filters needed to see into Jupiter’s haze. By deploying lenses that screen for UV light, infrared, and other frequencies, scientists will get a more complete picture of what is happening.

This week we will encircle the famous gas giant and peer down onto the planet with Juno’s eyes. Grab your space suit, we’re going in!

Juno was 29,000 miles from Jupiter when it snapped this photo in May 2019. You can see the windy bands of Jupiter, as well as the series of white storms also called the “String of Pearls.”Photograph: Gerald Eichstadt/Sean Doran/NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS
This is the view from only 11,000 miles above the surface. This “blue” region is made up of swirling, connected storms. The white clouds to the left are high-altitude clouds, which cast shadows onto the next layer of atmosphere below them.Photograph: Gerald Eichstadt/Sean Doran/NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS
Jupiter completes a full rotation on its axis every 10 hours, which makes for a very churny planet, as you can see in this slightly dizzying photo of the windy bands that move at speeds of 300 miles per hour.Photograph: Björn Jónsson/NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS
During its 11th close flyby, Juno took this color enhanced photo showing Jupiter in a rosy light.Photograph: Matt Brealey/Gustavo B. C./NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS
This jet stream, known as Jet N3, is an intricate swirl of storms. It wasn’t until Juno arrived at Jupiter that scientists realized the storms in the atmosphere weren’t just in the atmosphere, but rather they extended deep into the planet–some 1,900 miles deep.Photograph: Gerald Eichstädt/NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS
There is no mistaking Jupiter’s great red spot. This color enhanced image brings out the deep orangy-red of this iconic storm—scientists think that the reddish color could be caused by the sun’s radiation interacting with the ammonium hydrosulfide in the planet’s atmosphere. You can also see part of the tan-colored belt and a white cyclone that is not much smaller than the Earth. These different colors are likely created by the sunlight reflecting off of chemicals in the clouds.Photograph: Gerald Eichstadt/Sean Doran/ NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS

Head over here to look at more space photos.

Read More