Categories
Police Protesters

Police, protesters clash after Belarus presidential vote – Fox News

In a country where crackdowns on dissent are routine, Belarus police and protesters clashed in the capital Minsk and the city of Brest Sunday night over rising discontent with the authoritarian rule of the country’s longtime leader, who recently sought a sixth term.

Sunday’s vote in the ex-Soviet nation pitted President Alexander Lukashenko, who has held an iron grip on Belarus since 1994, against four others. The campaign has generated the country’s biggest opposition protests in years. Opposition supporters say they suspect election officials will manipulate the results of Sunday’s vote to give the 65-year-old Lukashenko a sixth term.

Demonstrators run away from police as they gather to protest against a result of the Belarusian presidential election in Minsk, Belarus, Sunday, Aug. 9, 2src2src. Police and protesters clashed in Belarus' capital and the major city of Brest on Sunday after the presidential election in which the authoritarian leader who has ruled for a quarter-century sought a sixth term in office. 

Demonstrators run away from police as they gather to protest against a result of the Belarusian presidential election in Minsk, Belarus, Sunday, Aug. 9, 2020. Police and protesters clashed in Belarus’ capital and the major city of Brest on Sunday after the presidential election in which the authoritarian leader who has ruled for a quarter-century sought a sixth term in office. 
(AP)

The head of the Central Elections Commission, Lidia Yermoshina, said early Monday that partial results from some regions showed Lukashenko with a crushing lead, getting more than 90% of the vote in some districts.

Lukashenko himself was defiant as he voted earlier on Sunday.

“If you provoke, you will get the same answer,” he said. “Do you want to try to overthrow the government, break something, wound, offend, and expect me or someone to kneel in front of you and kiss them and the sand onto which you wandered? This will not happen.”

BELARUS DETAINS 33 SUSPECTED RUSSIAN MERCENARIES CLAD IN ‘MILITARY-STYLE CLOTHING’

Police block a road and use smoke grenades during a protest after the Belarusian presidential election in Minsk, Belarus, Sunday, Aug. 9, 2src2src. Belarus police and protesters clashed in the capital and the city of Brest Sunday night after a presidential election in which the country's longtime leader sought a sixth term despite rising discontent with his authoritarian rule and his cavalier dismissal of the coronavirus pandemic.

Police block a road and use smoke grenades during a protest after the Belarusian presidential election in Minsk, Belarus, Sunday, Aug. 9, 2020. Belarus police and protesters clashed in the capital and the city of Brest Sunday night after a presidential election in which the country’s longtime leader sought a sixth term despite rising discontent with his authoritarian rule and his cavalier dismissal of the coronavirus pandemic.
(AP)

Belarusians have been weary of the country’s deteriorating economy as well as the president’s cavalier dismissal of the coronavirus pandemic.

Police presence in Minsk was heavy throughout the day and in the evening police set up checkpoints on the city’s perimeter to check residence permits, apparently worried that protesters would come from other cities.

PUTIN COULD MAKE MOVE TO ABSORB BELARUS, EUROPE’S ‘LAST DICTATORSHIP,’ EXPERTS SAY

Protesters shout

Protesters shout “Go away!” as they gather after the Belarusian presidential election in Minsk, Belarus, Sunday, Aug. 9, 2020. Belarus police and protesters clashed in the capital and the city of Brest Sunday night after a presidential election in which the country’s longtime leader sought a sixth term despite rising discontent with his authoritarian rule and his cavalier dismissal of the coronavirus pandemic.
(AP)

About 1,000 protesters gathered near the obelisk honoring Minsk as a World War II “hero city,” where police clashed with them, beating some with truncheons and later using flash-bang grenades to try to disperse them. Protesters later tried to build barricades with trash containers.

Protests also broke out in the major cities of Brest, Gomel, Grodno and Vitebsk and police fired tear gas at the demonstrators in Brest, news reports said.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

There was no official information on the number of arrests or people injured, but Ales Bilyatsky of the Viasna human rights group told The Associated Press that he believed there were several hundred.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Read More

Categories
Portland Protesters

Portland protesters clash with law enforcement for first time since federal presence diminished | TheHill – The Hill

Two protesters were arrested Saturday evening in Portland, Ore., as demonstrators and law enforcement clashed for the first time in several days.

The Associated Press reported that a confrontation between protesters and law enforcement occurred near a precinct for the Portland Police Bureau and Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office. Officers alleged they were struck with glass bottles and had laser pointers aimed in their direction. No officers were injured, including one who was struck with a canister of paint, according to the AP.

Police reportedly declared an unlawful assembly just before 10 p.m. local time and ordered crowds to disperse.

Across town a separate, peaceful demonstration hosted by the NAACP and attended by Oregon Sen. Jeff MerkleyJeffrey (Jeff) Alan MerkleyNew York police confirm arrest of protester in unmarked van Overnight Defense: Guardsman to testify Lafayette Square clearing was ‘unprovoked escalation’ | Dems push for controversial Pentagon nominee to withdraw | Watchdog says Pentagon not considering climate change risks to contractors Democrats urge controversial Pentagon policy nominee to withdraw MORE (D) was held outside the Mark O. Hatfield Courthouse. Speakers talked about political progress arising from the weeks of demonstrations in the city and others across the U.S.

“The next thing we need you to do is vote like your life depends on it, because guess what, it does,” Portland City Commissioner Jo Ann Hardesty told demonstrators at the courthouse, according to the AP.

Demonstrations in the city have largely remained peaceful over the last several days as the federal law enforcement presence began withdrawing from city streets. 

City officials and state leaders had sharply criticized the Trump administration’s decision to deploy agents from the Department of Homeland Security to Portland, accusing federal law enforcement of inflaming tensions in the city. Images and videos posted on social media that showed federal agents wearing unmarked uniforms detaining protesters off the street in the city had sparked outrage last month.

Protests against racism and police brutality have continued for months in numerous American cities following the death of George Floyd, a Black man who died in Minneapolis police custody in late May. One white officer is charged with second-degree murder in Floyd’s case.

Updated at 8 p.m.

Read More

Categories
Anti-mask Protesters

Anti-mask protesters’ new weapon: wearing masks that offer no COVID-19 protection – WTHR

Face masks made of mesh, crochet (yarn) or lace are now popular items being offered by online retailers.

INDIANAPOLIS — As more communities and businesses adopt mandatory mask orders, supporters of an “anti-mask” movement are looking to make a statement. They are wearing masks that cover their nose and mouth but provide no ability to slow the spread of disease.

“I wore a mask that is designed for protecting your face in a paintball battle. You can easily breathe through it. I walked all around the store, talked to employees, and other shoppers, and every one of them could see my mouth,” said a Florida man who posted a video showing him wearing a mesh mask to a Tampa Walmart. “It was almost like not wearing a mask at all. Nobody cared. That’s because it’s not about safety. It’s all about compliance.”

Other social media posts show anti-mask advocates wearing mesh masks intended to comply with the letter – but not the spirit – of municipal and corporate rules mandating face coverings.

And masks made of mesh, crochet (yarn) or lace are now popular items being offered by internet retailers. Most include warnings stating the items “are NOT intended for protection or COVID use.” But protection is not what anti-mask protesters are looking for.

“Make your own Anti Mask!” said the seller of a pattern to create your own anti-mask. The description of the product states: “Stylish, breathable and don’t protect you from a darn thing! Masks required? No problem! Breath free while making a statement.”

“NO law requires a specific type or particulate rating of mask,” said one protestor, posting a photo of a woman wearing a mesh face covering. “This is about compliance, not safety.”

The public health officials and doctors recently interviewed by 13News disagree.

“Masks absolutely work. They’re not perfect. They’re not the only measure you need to take to keep this virus under control but they’re very effective and they’re very simple,” said Dr. Christopher Belcher, who serves as the infection prevention medical director at Ascension St. Vincent Hospital in Indianapolis.

“The most important thing they do is if you’re coughing, sneezing, singing, they contain all of those little droplets of saliva or mucus that come out of your nose and mouth, and keep them right there from spreading to other people,” Belcher added.

Earlier this month, 13 Investigates and the IU Health Pathology Lab tested different kinds of masks. The test showed even very inexpensive masks are highly effective in preventing the spread of germs linked to viruses.

The science has prompted many cities and states to impose orders requiring face coverings in public places. (Indianapolis currently has a public order in effect but the state of Indiana does not.) Companies like Costco have been requiring customers to wear masks for months, and more businesses recently announced they will require face coverings, too. Walmart and Kroger, two of the largest retail/grocery corporations in the nation, will begin implementing mask requirements for customers next week.

The growing trend seems to be causing growing frustration among anti-mask advocates, who have been voicing their dissent at municipal buildings, statehouses and in online forums – and by wearing mesh masks intended to offer protest rather than COVID-19 protection.

Belcher says he does not mind people protesting over masks, as long as those protests are not putting others in danger.

“I need your help with this to keep from spreading the infection so the hospitals don’t get overrun,” he told 13News. “If you’re going to go to the trouble of wearing a mask, please wear one that’s going to do something for other people. I don’t care if you write ‘NO’ on it. I don’t care if you have a t-shirt that says ‘I don’t want to wear this mask,’ but I need you to wear the mask. It’s an important thing for our health.”

Trend data released Thursday afternoon by the Regenstrief Institute shows positive COVID-19 cases, emergency room visits and deaths related to the coronavirus are all increasing in Indiana. That’s why health officials continue to emphasize the importance of wearing a mask.

Read More

Categories
Protesters statues

Protesters tear down statues from Confederate monuments in DC and North Carolina – CNN

(CNN)A protester climbed up and wrapped a strap around the neck of a statue on a Confederate monument in North Carolina and pulled it down.

A second statue on the other side of the monument was also pulled down, according to footage taken by CNN affiliate WRAL on Friday. The statues were at the state capitol in Raleigh. Protesters then marched down the street and hung both statues from a light post on the street.
In Washington, DC, protesters toppled a statue of Albert Pike in the Judiciary Square neighborhood, according to CNN affiliate WJLA. Pike was a senior officer of the Confederate States Army.
These are the latest incidents of Confederate monuments getting removed nationwide in the wake of the George Floyd protests. Protesters in some cases and city leaders in others have taken down contentious statues, which some people say mark history and honor heritage while others argue they are racist symbols of America’s dark legacy of slavery. While some cities have made efforts to remove them, others have passed laws to protect them.
A crowd gathered in the Atlanta suburb of Decatur Thursday night to watch the removal of a Confederate monument after the city argued it’d become a threat to public safety during recent protests. A judge ordered it removed and placed in storage until further notice.
As a large crane pulled down the obelisk just before midnight Thursday, people chanted, “Take it down! Take it down!” Others applauded.
Floyd’s death during an arrest by a White police officer ignited protests against racism and police brutality. The 46-year-old Black man died on May 25 in Minneapolis in an incident captured on video.
Just this month alone, a series of statues have been removed, including Christopher Columbus, another controversial figure in US history. Some Christopher Columbus statues have been tampered with — one thrown into a lake, one beheaded, and another pulled to the ground.

Read More

Categories
Far-Right Protesters

Far-Right protesters clash with police in London near defaced Churchill monument – Fox News

Far-right activists on Saturday clashed with police in London, claiming they were in the city to protect monuments from anti-racist protesters.

British nationalists, including Britain First, Football Lads Alliance and other groups, put out a call ahead of weekend protests in an effort to protect statues that they believe essential to British culture and history. The main focus of their actions was the Churchill statue at the Cenotaph, a war memorial on Whitehall in London.

Members of Football Lads Alliance, standing at a police barrier along Whitehall, in central London, chant slogans, Saturday, June 13, 2src2src.

Members of Football Lads Alliance, standing at a police barrier along Whitehall, in central London, chant slogans, Saturday, June 13, 2020.
(AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)

The Churchill statue had been boarded up for protection after Black Lives Matter protesters scrawled “is a racist” on it. Protesters against police brutality and racism had taken to tearing down other statues, mostly of slave traders, which Prime Minister Boris Johnson called an attempt “to lie about our history.”

Crowds of mostly white far-right activists clashed with police outside the Cenotaph, hurling traffic cones, flag poles and smoke flares at the police before breaching the police barriers, according to the BBC. Police fought back with batons to maintain their line.

The activists, some adorned in “White Lives Matter” or “Proud Loyalist” shirts, then moved to Trafalgar Square, where police headed them off to prevent a clash with Black Lives Matter protesters in Hyde Park.

Counter-protesters gesture in Trafalgar Square ahead of a Black Lives Matter protest following the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis police custody, in London, Britain, June 13, 2src2src. 

Counter-protesters gesture in Trafalgar Square ahead of a Black Lives Matter protest following the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis police custody, in London, Britain, June 13, 2020. 
(Reuters)

Many in the crowd chanted “Ingerland, Ingerland, Ingerland,” and singing “God Save the Queen.” The Telegraph estimated that 3,000 people had turned out, most of them drinking beer throughout the events.

Government officials immediately denounced the violence, with London Mayor Sadiq Khan warning residents to stay away.

“This is totally unacceptable. We will not tolerate attacks on our police and perpetrators will feel the full force of the law,” Khan tweeted on Saturday. “It is clear that far right groups are causing violence and disorder in central London, I urge people to stay away.”

Home Secretary Priti Patel called the violence “thoroughly unacceptable thuggery.”

“Any perpetrators of violence or vandalism should expect to face the full force of the law. Violence towards our police officers will not be tolerated,” she tweeted, adding a warning about the coronavirus and urging residents to return to their homes.

Demonstrators hold signs as they attend a Black Lives Matter protest following the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis police custody, in Newcastle, Britain, June 13, 2src2src. 

Demonstrators hold signs as they attend a Black Lives Matter protest following the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis police custody, in Newcastle, Britain, June 13, 2020. 
(Reuters)

Black Lives Matter organizers had urged people to not join rallies this weekend in anticipation of trouble from far-right groups. Britain First organizer Paul Golding had posted videos across the week in which he slammed BLM as a “vile racist group,” and the group had organized a number of White Lives Matter protests across the UK.

Activists gather at the cenotaph in George Square to protect it from any vandalism attacks on June 13, 2src2src in Glasgow, Scotland. The Loyalist Defence League has asked followers to gather in George Square today for a 'protect the Cenotaph' event in response to statues being defaced across Scotland following BLM demonstrations.

Activists gather at the cenotaph in George Square to protect it from any vandalism attacks on June 13, 2020 in Glasgow, Scotland. The Loyalist Defence League has asked followers to gather in George Square today for a ‘protect the Cenotaph’ event in response to statues being defaced across Scotland following BLM demonstrations.
(Getty)

Protesters turned out in cities across the U.K. almost in defiance of the counter-protests, including in Newcastle, Glasgow, Birmingham, Manchester and Belfast.

The Met police issued a Section 60 order, giving police greater power to stop and search citizens. The decision to extend powers was granted after the Met received reports of individuals coming to the city with weapons.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP 

Police moved to clear the area around Waterloo station as word of “pyrotechnics and knives” raised concerns of further violence into the night.

The protests were meant to wind down by 5 p.m. BST, but it does not appear that all protesters or activists have complied.

Read More

Categories
negotiate Protesters

Protesters negotiate with local officials over leaving Seattle ‘autonomous zone’ | TheHill – The Hill

The Seattle Police Department has negotiated with Black Lives Matter (BLM) protesters who have occupied a six-block radius for most of the week after driving police from the local precinct.

Demonstrators in the city, who had clashed with Seattle police repeatedly during protests over the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis police custody, forced officers out of the East Precinct station at the beginning of the week, dubbing the area the Capitol Hill Autonomous Zone (CHAZ).

During the week, organizers said that thousands of people were occupying the CHAZ, The Wall Street Journal reported.

BLM protesters had stated earlier that they would not leave the area until the city had met its list of demands regarding police reform and increased funding for Seattle’s black communities.

“It’s a temporary occupation until we get our demands met,” BLM spokeswoman Jessica Kilpatrick told the Journal.

Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan (D) has agreed to invest at least $100 million the city’s minority communities and is also establishing a community-driven Black Commission.

A Durkan spokeswoman told the paper that Seattle police were responding to calls in the area on Friday and that some officers had returned to the precinct, though the Journal reported that no police presence was visible in the CHAZ on Friday.

The weeklong occupation drew ire from President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump reschedules Tulsa rally after criticism of overlap with Juneteenth New York Times endorses Engel primary challenger Trump campaign manager says 300,000 tickets registered for upcoming rally MORE and conservative commentators. Trump tweeted Thursday, “Radical Left Governor @JayInslee and the Mayor of Seattle are being taunted and played at a level that our great Country has never seen before. Take back your city NOW. If you don’t do it, I will.”

Durkan has pushed back on Trump, telling him in a tweet earlier in the week to “go back to your bunker.”

Gov. Jay InsleeJay Robert InsleeInslee calls on Trump to ‘stay out of Washington state’s business’ Seattle mayor responds to Trump: ‘Go back to your bunker’ Trump warns he will take back Seattle from ‘ugly Anarchists’ if local leaders don’t act MORE (D) also bristled at the president’s tweet.

“What we will not allow are threats of military violence against Washingtonians coming from the White House,” Inslee said in a tweet. “The U.S. military serves to protect Americans, not the fragility of an insecure president.”

Read More

Categories
Protesters slave

UK protesters tear down slave trader statue, throw it in river – CNN














CNN




10M


Want to watch this again later?

Sign in to add this video to a playlist.

Sign in


Like this video?

Sign in to make your opinion count.

Sign in



Don’t like this video?

Sign in to make your opinion count.

Sign in



Rating is available when the video has been rented.

This feature is not available right now. Please try again later.

Published on 8 Jun 2020

Anti-racism demonstrators in the UK tore down a statue of a 17th-century slave trader, rolled it through the streets and dumped it in the sea on Sunday, in a dramatic act of protest that has shone a spotlight on the country’s stubborn colonial legacy.

#CNN #News

Read More

Categories
moment Protesters

Protesters hope this is a moment of reckoning for American policing. Experts say not so fast. – The Washington Post

But there are signs that Floyd’s killing might not be the watershed moment that civil rights advocates are hoping for, some experts say.

The extraordinary facts of the May 25 incident — the gradual loss of consciousness of a handcuffed man who cried out for his deceased mother with his final breaths — distinguishes it from the more common and more ambiguous fatal police encounters that lead to debate over whether use of force was justified. And the politics of police reform that have squashed previous efforts still loom: powerful unions, legal immunity for police and intractable implicit biases.

“We have 400 years of history of policing that tell me things tend not to change,” said Lorenzo Boyd, director of the Center for Advanced Policing at the University of New Haven. “It’s a breaking point right now, just like Trayvon Martin was a breaking point, just like Michael Brown was a breaking point. But the question is: Where do we go from here?”

It’s a familiar question for Gwen Carr, who watched her son take his final breaths on video as a New York police officer held him in a chokehold and he pleaded, “I can’t breathe.”

Thousands of Americans filled the streets for Eric Garner in 2014 — mostly black men and women — with bull horns and protest signs in dozens of cities.

But their pleas for comprehensive police reforms took hold in only a smattering of the country’s more than 18,000 police departments. Dozens of agencies adopted training on de-escalating tense encounters. Sixteen states passed stricter requirements for use of deadly force.

Not a single piece of federal legislation passed on Capitol Hill.

So when Carr reached out last week to the family of 46-year-old Floyd, who uttered the same words as her son while officers held him down, she offered encouragement — and a warning.

“I told them, ‘Don’t think it’s going to be a slam dunk,’ ” Carr said. “They had video of my son, too; the world also saw him murdered. It should have been a slam dunk then — it’s been anything but.”

Changing perspectives

There are some signs that this time is different. For one thing, public perception of police bias has started to shift. Last week, a poll by Monmouth University found that 57 percent of Americans now say police in difficult situations are more likely to use excessive force against black people. That’s a substantial jump from the 34 percent of registered voters who said the same when asked a similar question after the fatal police shooting of Alton Sterling in Baton Rouge in 2016.

Civil rights leaders and allied lawmakers point to substantial differences in protest crowds this time around: Their historic size, even during a pandemic. The faces, now as likely to be white and brown as they are to be black. After Garner’s death, there were about 50 demonstrations, compared with more than 450 so far this time around, based on media coverage and police records.

“I don’t think they used to think there was an attack on black lives. Not until it was recorded and people were seeing it, I don’t think they believed it,” said Lezley Mc­Spadden, mother of Michael Brown, who was killed by a Ferguson, Mo., police officer in 2014. “What is happening now is not new to those of us who live in these oppressed areas and communities that are devalued. But it’s new for people who don’t live in those areas. It’s changing people’s perspective.”

Even some Republican lawmakers have broken from strict law-and-order stances to express support for protesters. Last week, Sen. Roy Blunt (R-Mo.) said, “I think people are understanding that those protests make sense.” And Sen. Lindsey O. Graham (R-S.C.), chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee and a staunch Trump ally, allowed that “there’s a problem here, and we have to get to the bottom of it.”

The growing assortment of voices represents an important shift, said Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.). He is among the sponsors of the Justice in Policing Act, expected to roll out Monday. The massive package targets racial profiling, bans chokeholds and no-knock warrants, and makes it easier to prosecute and sue for police misconduct.

“No change in America that is worth it has been easy. But the demands are now coming from increasingly diverse coalitions,” Booker said. “I feel we are in a moment now.”

‘The deeper problem’

Reform advocates have won other victories. Last week, the Minneapolis City Council unanimously passed a ban on chokeholds and neck restraints. And the council in New York is poised to pass a law this month that would make using a chokehold in an arrest a misdemeanor.

Without systemic change, however, some experts say these piecemeal policies would do little to curb the use of excessive force and racial inequities in policing. And the effectiveness of policy changes is blunted by police union contracts that protect officers from discipline and firing for wayward behavior.

“There are so many terms and conditions in the collective bargaining agreements that insulate police from accountability and transparency,” said Jody Armour, a law professor at the University of Southern California. “Can we know who the bad police are? Are there public records? A lot of times, that is squelched in collective bargaining.”

Even changes to training can have little effect. A growing number of police departments are providing cadets with de-escalation and anti-bias training, but once they are assigned to a field training officer — a veteran on the force — the training can fall by the wayside, according to police training experts.

One of the rookie officers who helped hold Floyd down questioned whether they should roll the gasping man over, but then-officer Derek Chauvin dismissed the suggestion and insisted on “staying put” with his knee on Floyd’s neck, according to court records.

“Seasoned officers will push away from what they learned in the academy and go to what works for them in the street,” Boyd said. “And officers will often say, ‘We have to police people differently because force is all they understand.’”

Those views appear to disproportionately impact black communities, at least in the most extreme cases. A Washington Post database that tracks fatal police shootings found that about 1,000 people have been killed by police gunfire every year since 2015. So far this year, 463 people have been fatally shot. While the vast majority are white men armed with weapons, black men are killed at a rate that far outstrips their numbers in the overall population.

Other forms of police violence, from chokeholds to beatings in custody, also tend to fall heavily on African Americans, Armour said.

“When you give police discretion to enforce any law, it seems to get disproportionately enforced against black folk. Whether it’s curfew, social distancing,” said Armour, noting that Floyd was accused of using a counterfeit $20 bill.

“Would you have put your knee on a white guy’s neck like that? Would you have a little more recognition of humanity, and when he’s screaming out, ‘I can’t breathe,’ would that have raised more concern?” he said. “That’s the deeper problem.”

The vast majority of such cases are not caught on video and therefore often go unnoticed, Boyd said. For example, Breonna Taylor, the 26-year-old emergency room technician who was shot at least eight times inside her home by Louisville police in March, is often left out of the discussion of systemic injustice — in part because no one was there to record Taylor getting shot by officers serving a drug warrant at the wrong address, said Andra Gillespie, director of the James Weldon Johnson Institute at Emory University. All three remain on administrative leave, but no charges have been filed, according to the Courier Journal.

“Video is certainly aiding in getting justice for these individual people,” Gillespie said. “Breonna Taylor hasn’t gotten comparable attention because there is no video. That’s also because she’s a woman, and we forget the black women are subject to disproportional police violence as well.”

Even killings captured on video rarely lead to prosecution of police officers. Sterling had a handgun in his pocket when he was tackled by police outside a Baton Rouge convenience store, and police said he was reaching for it when officers shot him six times. The DOJ and Louisiana attorney general decided not to file criminal charges against the officers involved. Attorneys for the officer who put Garner, 43, in a chokehold argued that he probably died because he was obese and had resisted arrest. Daniel Pantaleo lost his job after a disciplinary hearing four years later, but the Justice Department declined to bring criminal charges.

Floyd’s killing has received near-universal condemnation because it lacks the contradictory evidence that allows skeptics to deny that race was a factor in police behavior, said Armour, author of “Negrophobia and Reasonable Racism: The Hidden Costs of Being Black in America.”

“It’s almost like you have a case that’s so cry-out-loud bad that people who aren’t necessarily that sympathetic to black equality are able to come out and now make a big display,” Armour said. “It’s not that often you run into these knockdown, no-question videos.”

Setting a different tone

That raises the question of whether the nation is experiencing a real turning point or simply responding to a particularly egregious offense, some experts say.

There have been many questionable displays of solidarity: When the Washington Redskins joined the #BlackoutTuesday protest by posting a black square on Twitter, critics noted the perceived hypocrisy from an organization whose team name is a slur for Native Americans. And as New York Police Commissioner Dermot Shea celebrated images of officers embracing peaceful protesters, video surfaced Wednesday that showed his officers beating a cyclist with batons in the street.

“We’ve seen officers kneeling in the same departments that are brutalizing journalists and protesters,” said Philip Atiba Goff, director of the Center for Policing Equity research center. “You can’t say justice for George Floyd, that you condemn the actions, while you condone the actions in your own house.”

Charles H. Ramsey, a former chief in the District and Philadelphia and co-chair of President Barack Obama’s Task Force on 21st Century Policing, said perhaps the biggest obstacle to nationwide change is the unwieldy way in which police departments are organized. With every city, town, state and county fielding its own force, he said, it’s hard to standardize training and policies.

“Regionalizing them would be a solid first step,” Ramsey said. “But then you get into the politics. Every county and every mayor; they want their own police force, they want their own chief.”

For that reason, a coalition of nearly 400 disparate organizations is focusing on securing federal reforms. Last week, the group — including the NAACP, the Center for Reproductive Rights and the American Music Therapy Association — sent a joint letter to congressional leaders calling for legislation to combat police violence.

“With so many police departments, it is important that there is federal action,” said Vanita Gupta, a former head of the U.S. Department of Justice’s Civil Rights Division and CEO of the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights.

Although past efforts at policing reforms stalled in Congress, Booker expressed optimism, noting that civil rights legislation has always traveled a bumpy road. Bills were introduced and stagnated for years before the Civil Rights Act passed in 1964 and the Voting Rights Act passed in 1965, he said.

Police reform advocates are skeptical. Ramsey noted that the playbook for reform that he created as chair of Obama’s policing commission sat on a shelf, unused, for five years. Meanwhile, the FBI still hasn’t followed through on a pledge to aggressively track the nation’s fatal police shootings.

“It’s been five years since they promised to fix that database,” Ramsey said. “Come on. That’s enough time.”

Julie Tate, Steven Rich, Alice Crites and Derek Hawkins contributed to this report.

Read More

Categories
Protesters Thousands

Thousands of protesters gather in DC for largest George Floyd demonstration yet – Fox News

Hundreds of thousands of protesters gathered Saturday across Washington D.C., including near the White House, to march against police brutality and racism in response to the recent death of George Floyd in police custody — part of protests that took place in cities across the U.S.

Black Lives Matter organizers were hoping to draw a million protesters, with groups of demonstrators gathering at the Capitol, the National Mall, and with thousands gathering near the White House. A law enforcement source told Fox News that an estimated 200,000 people came to protest in D.C. throughout the course of the day.

One crowd of about 2,000 people gathered at Malcolm X Park at one point and, after giving speeches and singing, began marching down 16th Street toward the White House, according to Fox News’ Kelly Phares. Protesters gathered in front of newly-installed high fencing that was keeping protestors out of Lafayette Park in front of the White House.

Authorities have expanded the fenced security perimeter around the White House, which now reaches to the outskirts of a park complex known as the Ellipse, near the National Mall. It comes amid concerns that the mostly peaceful protests seen in recent days could be marred by the rioting and looting seen at the beginning of the week and last weekend.

“We have a lot of public, open-source information to suggest that the event on this upcoming Saturday may be one of the largest that we’ve had in the city,” D.C. Police Chief Peter Newsham told reporters Thursday.

President Trump tweeted that there was a “much smaller crowd in D.C. than anticipated.”

“National Guard, Secret Service, and D.C. Police have been doing a fantastic job. Thank you!” he tweeted.

Protesters also demonstrated in San Francisco and New York City, as well as Philadelphia and Chicago. As of Saturday evening there were few signs of the violence that had marred previous protests in recent days.

It was not clear how many would show up for Saturday’s demonstrations, but #1MillionDCSaturday was trending on Twitter in a call for 1 million people to march on the capital.

Crowds applauded for D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser as she walked along the portion of 16th Street that she renamed Black Lives Matter Plaza. Bowser has feuded with President Trump over the city’s handling of the protests, that devolved into riots earlier in the week.

Trump accused her of not doing enough to shut down the violence, while Bowser has pushed back on Trump’s calls for the use of federal law enforcement to quell disturbances.

Uniformed military personnel walk in front of the White House ahead of a protest against racial inequality in the aftermath of the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd, in Washington, U.S. June 6, 2src2src. 

Uniformed military personnel walk in front of the White House ahead of a protest against racial inequality in the aftermath of the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd, in Washington, U.S. June 6, 2020. 
(Reuters)

Army Secretary Ryan McCarthy said Friday that local officials were estimating a crowd of 100,000 to 200,000 protesters.

DC READIES FOR SATURDAY PROTESTS AS POLICE CHIEF SAYS IT MAY BE ‘LARGEST WE’VE HAD IN THE CITY’

Newsham wouldn’t commit to a number but predicted it would be smaller than the Women’s March in 2017, which drew roughly a million people.

Police announced Friday that large swaths of roads would be closed to make room for demonstrators Saturday.

U.S. Park Police told McClatchy DC it was using “intelligence to monitor upcoming events” but would not divulge details that could “pose a hazard to the public and police.”

More than 4,500 National Guard troops are still deployed in Washington and various federal law enforcement officers are also patrolling the city,

But Bowser wants all non-D.C.troops out of the city. All 900 active-duty military police brought to bases around Washington following the civil unrest after Floyd’s death are heading home, the Department of Defense said Friday.

Bowser said she only requested 100 D.C. National Guard troops to line the perimeter of the White House, in a limited role and unarmed.

Protesters have lined the streets surrounding the White House every day this week.  On Monday, riot police cleared peaceful protesters out of Lafayette Square, using pepper balls and smoke canisters, so that President Trump could walk to a neighboring church for a photo op.

Uniformed military personnel walks into the secured White House area ahead of a protest against racial inequality in reaction to the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd, in Washington, U.S., June 6, 2src2src. 

Uniformed military personnel walks into the secured White House area ahead of a protest against racial inequality in reaction to the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd, in Washington, U.S., June 6, 2020. 
(Reuters)

Since then protests have been largely peaceful with few arrests, and the city has not enforced a curfew since Wednesday night.

Across the nation, the number of National Guard troops mobilized across the country has doubled in the past four days. The National Guard tweet Saturday that 43,000 troops were deployed across 34 states and D.C. to assist law enforcement with civil unrest, while 37,000 Guard soldiers and airmen continue to assist with Covid-19 response.

Dozens of protests are planned across all boroughs in New York City, after Friday the Manhattan DA Cyrus Vance Jr. announced that his office would not prosecute protesters charged with breaking curfew or other low-level offenses. Protesters charged with low-level offenses “undermines critical bonds between law enforcement and the communities we serve,” the district attorney said.

New York City has an 8 p.m. curfew in place until Sunday night, after looters ransacked businesses, mostly at the beginning of the week. There have been a number of clashes between officers and aggressive protesters, but as the week has progressed, protests have grown more peaceful.  Police say they’ve arrested in the city about 2,500 people since the end of May.

On Friday, Mayor Bill de Blasio explained why he didn’t lift the curfew.

“Anyone who would say ‘Is it more harm than good?’ I would say no. We’ve had three really good nights after two really bad nights,” the mayor said.

New York Police Department officers stand in formation after arresting multiple protesters marching after curfew on Fifth Avenue, Thursday, June 4, 2src2src, in New York. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

New York Police Department officers stand in formation after arresting multiple protesters marching after curfew on Fifth Avenue, Thursday, June 4, 2020, in New York. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

In Chicago, officials prepared for another busy weekend of demonstrations, and hundreds had already begun to gather in Union Park on Saturday morning. The city shut down a number of main streets and modified transit routes for Saturday to make room for protesters. Chicago’s 9 p.m. curfew remains in place over the weekend.

At the same time, thousands of mourners showed up Saturday to remember Floyd ahead of a second memorial service, this time in North Carolina near where he was born.

The mourners lined up Saturday morning for a two-hour public viewing of his casket at Cape Fear Conference B in Raeford, about 24 miles from Fayetteville. A private service for family members only begins at 3 p.m. local time but is being broadcast.

Fox News’ Kelly Phares, Raymond Bogan and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Read More

Categories
Minneapolis Protesters

Minneapolis protesters trash police precinct during clash over George Floyd’s death – New York Post

May 27, 2020 | 1:17am | Updated May 27, 2020 | 2:15am

A protest in Minneapolis over the death of a black man in police custody turned violent Tuesday night, with demonstrators clashing with police and trashing a precinct building, reports said.

Several hundred demonstrators at about 6 p.m. splintered off from a mainly peaceful afternoon rally and marched to the Minneapolis police department’s 3rd Precinct to protest the death of George Floyd, WCCO-TV reported.

Floyd was seen on viral video being pinned down by a white Minneapolis police officer, yelling, “I can’t breathe” before he died.

The group targeted the precinct because it’s believed the four Minneapolis cops involved in Floyd’s arrest — who have all since been fired — worked there, the report said.

Unruly protesters spray-painted the precinct, tossed rocks at the building’s windows and vandalized at least one patrol car, according to Fox 9 footage.

“Break that shit,” one protester could be heard, as others cheer.

“It’s real ugly,” an unidentified protester told WCCO. “The police have to understand that this is the climate they have created, this is the climate they created.”

Police in riot gear arrived and fired tear gas at the protesters, who took aim at the officers with rocks, water bottles and other objects, the report said.

The FBI and Minnesota state authorities are investigating Floyd’s death.

Read More