Categories
intelligence shows

U.S. intelligence shows Russia is trying to “denigrate” Biden, while China prefers Trump lose – CBS News

The U.S. intelligence community has assessed that Russia is actively seeking to “denigrate” presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden and that some actors linked to the Kremlin are trying to boost President Trump’s candidacy ahead of the 2020 presidential election, according to the country’s top election security official.  

In an unprecedented statement outlining the candidate preferences of several foreign actors, National Counterintelligence and Security Center Director Bill Evanina also said China “prefers that President Trump – whom Beijing sees as unpredictable – does not win reelection,” and that Iran may try to “undermine” U.S. democratic institutions and the president, primarily through online and social media content.   

“Many foreign actors have a preference for who wins the election, which they express through a range of overt and private statements; covert influence efforts are rarer,” Evanina’s statement said. “We are primarily concerned about the ongoing and potential activity by China, Russia, and Iran.” 

Mr. Trump dismissed the intelligence on Russia. When a reporter in New Jersey asked the president about the assessment that Russia wants him to win reelection and China wants him to lose, Mr. Trump said, “The last person that Russia wants to see in office is Donald Trump.” When a reporter pointed out that’s not what intelligence officials said, the president responded, “I don’t care what anybody says.” 

His statement, issued less than three months before Election Day, identifies several examples of behavior the intelligence community considered in forming its assessment. Evanina has been the top U.S. counterintelligence official for years and was tapped to lead intelligence-based election security threat briefings in May. 

“China has been expanding its influence efforts ahead of November 2020 to shape the policy environment in the United States, pressure political figures it views as opposed to China’s interests, and deflect and counter criticism of China,” his statement said. It also cited Beijing’s criticism of the Trump administration’s COVID-19 response, its closure of the consulate in Houston, and recent actions taken to block social media platform TikTok.  

Russia, the assessment said, “is using a range of measures to primarily denigrate” Biden. “For example, pro-Russia Ukrainian parliamentarian Andriy Derkach is spreading claims about corruption – including through publicizing leaked phone calls – to undermine former Vice President Biden’s candidacy and the Democratic Party.” Mr. Trump’s candidacy was being boosted on social media and Russian television by unspecified actors linked to the Kremlin, Evanina’s statement said.  

“We assess that Iran seeks to undermine U.S. democratic institutions, President Trump, and to divide the country in advance of the 2020 election,” the statement continued, adding that Tehran’s efforts “probably will focus on on-line influence.”  

“Tehran’s motivation to conduct such activities is, in part, driven by a perception that President Trump’s reelection would result in a continuation of U.S. pressure on Iran in an effort to foment regime change,” the statement said.  

Friday’s update, which follows mounting pressure from Democratic lawmakers on the intelligence community to release more detailed information about election threats, said it represents “the most current, accurate, and objective election threat information the IC has to offer in an unclassified setting at this time.” 

But a U.S. official briefed on the intelligence cautioned that the update, while more detailed, suffered from an underlying lack of clarity about what each country was doing vis a vis the U.S. election, and why.  

“Only one of the three is actively seeking to interfere to the benefit of one candidate and at the expense of another, and that’s Russia,” the official said. “That doesn’t mean China doesn’t have a preference – but having a preference and doing something about it are not one and the same.”  

In a bipartisan statement, Senate Intelligence Committee acting Chairman Marco Rubio and Vice Chairman Mark Warner praised Evanina for providing “additional context” to a statement he issued late last month, 100 days before the election.  

“We thank him for providing this additional information to the American people, and we look forward to his continued engagement, along with other members of the Intelligence Community and the Administration, with the public over the next 87 days,” the lawmakers said. They encouraged the intelligence community to continue sharing information publicly and admonished political leaders “on all sides to refrain from weaponizing intelligence matters for political gain.” 

National Security Council spokesman John Ullyot said of Friday’s update that the U.S. “will not tolerate foreign interference in our electoral processes and will respond to malicious foreign threats that target our democratic institutions.” 

Publicly identifying the candidate preference of a foreign actor ahead of an election is an unprecedented step for the U.S. intelligence community. Although the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI) and the Department of Homeland Security issued a joint statement in October of 2016 stating that the Russian government was behind the hacking and dumping of emails and had been scanning and probing election systems, it was not until two months later, in January of 2017, that the intelligence community said explicitly that Moscow, having “developed a clear preference for President-elect Trump” took those and other measures in an effort to damage Secretary Clinton’s election chances and boost then-candidate Trump’s.  

That assessment – and subsequent efforts by the intelligence community to identify a preferred candidate in closed briefings – have become politically charged topics. Officials who told members of the House Intelligence Committee in February that Moscow had again demonstrated a preference for President Trump were criticized by Republicans who questioned the validity of the underlying intelligence.  

Press reports about that briefing infuriated Mr. Trump, who tweeted that Democrats had launched a “misinformation campaign” about Russia’s preference for his candidacy and removed then-acting Director of National Intelligence Joseph Maguire. Mr. Trump has consistently downplayed Russia’s 2016 interference campaign while highlighting Russian president Vladimir Putin’s denials that Moscow had meddled at all.   

The president has also criticized the work of U.S. intelligence agencies, whose findings on Russia’s 2016 campaign have been reinforced by a bipartisan Senate Committee and bolstered by the report compiled by special counsel Robert Mueller. 

Since 2016, intelligence and other administration officials have warned consistently that Russia and other adversaries were likely to continue engaging in election interference, likely using new and more sophisticated and less detectable tactics.   

All three countries identified in 2020 have previously been named as candidates likely to engage in disinformation and influence campaigns – including in the 2019 Worldwide Threat Assessment, an annual report compiled by the intelligence community on top global security challenges.   

“We expect our adversaries and strategic competitors to refine their capabilities and add new tactics as they learn from each other’s experiences, suggesting the threat landscape could look very different in 2020 and future elections,” the 2019 assessment said.  

Some Democrats have been sharply critical of many of ODNI’s election security disclosures to date. Senior Democrats belonging to the so-called “Gang of 8,” a select group of lawmakers routinely briefed by the executive branch on classified matters, criticized Evanina’s July statement for creating a false equivalence among actors of “unequal intent, motivation and capability,” and that the warning about Russia’s activities was “so generic as to be meaningless.”

Those same lawmakers – House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff and Warner – previously expressed concerns that Congress was being targeted in a “concerted foreign interference campaign” and called for a defensive counterintelligence briefing from the FBI.  

On Friday, Pelosi and Schiff welcomed Evanina’s update, though they maintained it did not go far enough to differentiate among the activities of the three countries.  

“[T]oday’s statement still treats three actors of differing intent and capability as equal threats to our democratic elections,” Schiff and Pelosi said. “Members of Congress have now been briefed on the specific threats facing the 2020 election, and we have been clear with the Intelligence Community that the American people must be provided with specific information that would allow voters to appraise for themselves the respective threats posed by these foreign actors, and distinguish these actors’ different and unequal aims, current actions, and capabilities.”  

Evanina, along with other senior national security officials, briefed lawmakers in multiple classified sessions late last week and early this week. 

His statement on Friday explicitly accused the Ukrainian politician, Derkach, of undermining Biden through weaponized leaks. Derkach is known to have met late last year with President Trump’s personal attorney, Rudy Giuliani, who has spoken openly about working with Ukrainian contacts to obtain information about Biden.  

Sources previously confirmed to CBS News that Democrats’ concerns had stemmed from some of Derkach’s materials being sent to certain lawmakers, including members of a Senate committee, led by Wisconsin Republican Senator Ron Johnson, that is currently investigating Biden and his son, Hunter. Politico first reported the details of Democrats’ concerns. 

Johnson has denied receiving information from foreign nationals about Biden and, together with Senator Chuck Grassley of Iowa, accused Democrats of assisting Russian disinformation efforts.   

In Friday’s update, Evanina said the intelligence community would continue to provide classified briefings to relevant stakeholders and unclassified updates to the public.  

“Aside from sharing information, let me assure you that the IC is also doing everything in its power to combat both cyber and influence efforts targeting our electoral process,” he said. “Our election should be our own.” 

— CBS News’ Kathryn Watson contributed to this report. 



Read More

Categories
shows Video

Video shows prison inmate saying ‘I can’t breathe’ as officers restrain him before he dies – ABC News

John Neville, 56, died in a hospital days after officers restrained him in jail.

Kelly McCarthy

August 6, 2020, 11:17 AM

5 min read

Video released of five North Carolina detention officers restraining an inmate in a cell shows the prisoner saying “I can’t breathe” before he lost consciousness and died two days later.

The five officers and a nurse were charged last month with involuntary manslaughter in the December 2019 death of John Neville, a 56-year-old Black man, at Forsyth County Detention Center in Winston-Salem.

Neville was being held at the facility on a pending assault charge when he apparently fell from the top bunk of his bed onto a concrete floor, prompting officers to check on him, according to authorities.

“Alright John, we’re going to take your blood pressure,” one of the five officers to respond could be heard telling Neville in body camera footage of the Dec. 2 incident that was released Wednesday.

Things took a turn when the officers put a spit mask over Neville’s head as the nurse attempted to treat him. An autopsy report said he was thrashing and at times unresponsive.

The officers handcuffed Neville behind his back and moved him to another cell for observation.

“I can’t breathe,” he can be heard saying in the video.

The five detention officers restrained him facedown and attempted to unlock the handcuffs, but required the use of bolt cutters to remove them from Neville’s wrists.

Again, Neville said he was having trouble breathing, to which a guard responded, “You can breathe — you’re talking aren’t you?”

Neville died two days later in an area hospital, after jail staff found him not breathing and could not detect a pulse. A medical examiner said he ultimately died from a brain injury that was caused by the way he was being restrained.

The autopsy also found a number of underlying medical conditions, including asthma and heart disease. The five detention officers were fired as a result of the incident.

A spokesperson for Wellpath, the medical agency that employs the nurse, said that she did not engage in misconduct and, when permitted to act, she worked diligently to save Neville’s life. The spokesperson added that she is currently on paid administrative leave and has Wellpath’s complete support.

Forsyth County Superior Court Judge R. Gregory Horne issued a ruling Friday releasing the video footage because he said it “is necessary to advance a compelling public interest.”

The Forsyth County sheriff issued an apology in the wake of the newly released videos.

“I apologize again for what happened on that day,” Sheriff Bobby Kimbrough said at a news conference Tuesday. “We’re sorry for the mistakes made that day. I take responsibility for that as the sheriff.”

Neville’s family, represented by attorney Michael Grace, has filed a civil lawsuit against the county of Forsyth and Wellpath “to see the family is justly compensated.”

“The sheriff has acknowledged mistakes were made and that means a lot to the family. It won’t bring John Neville back … but it goes a way toward causing this terrible scar to heal over again,” Grace said at the news conference.


ABC News


Read More

Categories
location shows

This map shows the location, evacuations for the Apple Fire in Cherry Valley – Press-Enterprise

Join the Conversation

We invite you to use our commenting platform to engage in insightful conversations about issues in our community. Although we do not pre-screen comments, we reserve the right at all times to remove any information or materials that are unlawful, threatening, abusive, libelous, defamatory, obscene, vulgar, pornographic, profane, indecent or otherwise objectionable to us, and to disclose any information necessary to satisfy the law, regulation, or government request. We might permanently block any user who abuses these conditions.

If you see comments that you find offensive, please use the “Flag as Inappropriate” feature by hovering over the right side of the post, and pulling down on the arrow that appears. Or, contact our editors by emailing moderator@scng.com.

Read More

Categories
Polls shows

Polls shows dead even race in Georgia between Trump, Biden; GOP leads Senate races – Fox News

It’s been nearly three decades since a Democrat won Georgia in a presidential election.

Arkansas Gov. Bill Clinton carried the state in the 1992 election.

But a new poll in Georgia indicates the state’s 16 electoral votes are up for grabs in the race between President Trump and Democratic challenger Joe Biden.

WHAT THE LATEST FOX NEWS POLLS IN THE BIDEN-TRUMP RACE SHOW

According to a Monmouth University poll conducted July 23-27 and released on Wednesday, the president and the presumptive Democratic nominee are deadlocked at 47 percent among registered voters in Georgia, with 3 percent saying they’ll vote for Libertarian candidate Jo Jorgensen and 3 percent undecided.

The poll shows that among the smaller pool of voters likely to vote in the general election, Trump has the slight edge. A high turnout likely model indicates the president with 48 percent support and Biden at 47 percent. A low likely turnout projection shows Trump at 49 percent support and the former vice president at 46 percent.

An average of the most recent polls conducted in Georgia compiled by Real Clear Politics indicates the president with a narrow 2.3 percent edge.

Trump won Georgia by 5 percentage points over 2016 Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton.

“There is a lot of parity between the two candidates. Trump has a lock on his base but Biden is performing much better than Clinton did in key swing areas,” Monmouth University Polling Institute director Patrick Murray highlighted.

While the polls show a close contest in Georgia, the Biden campaign has not – to date – gone up with commercials in the state, according to Advertising Analytics, a leading political ad tracking firm.

MAJOR PRO-GOP OUTSIDE GROUP POURS MONEY INTO INCREASINGLY COMPETITIVE GEORGIA

In Georgia’s regularly scheduled Senate election, the survey shows Republican incumbent David Perdue holding a 49-43 percent advantage over Democratic challenger Jon Ossoff, who narrowly lost a 2017 special congressional election that was the most expensive House election in history.

There’s also a special Senate election on Nov. 3 in the race to fill the final two years of the term of former Republican Sen. John Isakson, who stepped down in December due to health reasons.

GOP Gov. Brian Kemp named Republican Kelly Loeffler as Isakson’s temporary replacement. She’s running in the November election to fill the rest of Isakson’s term. So is Republican Rep. Doug Collins, who President Trump had hoped would be appointed as Isakson’s temporary replacement. A number of Democrats are also running.

The poll indicates Loeffler leading the pack at 26 percent, followed by Collins at 20 percent. Democrat Matt Lieberman – the son of former Democrat turned independent Sen. Joe Lieberman of Connecticut – is third at 14 percent.

If no candidate tops 50 percent in the Nov. 3 special election, a runoff contest between the top two finishers will be held on Jan. 5.

Monmouth University used live telephone operators to question 402 registered voters in Georgia. The survey’s overall sampling error is plus or minus 4.9 percentage points.

Read More

Categories
launches shows

Snap launches new shows, games, developer tools in bid to grow audience – Reuters

FILE PHOTO: The Snapchat app logo is seen on a smartphone in this picture illustration taken September 15, 2017. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic/Illustration

(Reuters) – Snap Inc on Thursday announced a slate of new features for its photo messaging app Snapchat, such as new original shows and ways for outside developers to create products that will entice users to spend more time using the app.

Snap has sought to set itself apart from rivals for both users and investors, focusing on communication between close friends rather than broadcasting to an open audience, and allowing it to avoid the misinformation and hate speech problems that have plagued Facebook and Twitter. Shares of Snap have risen more than 50% over the past year.

During a webcast for Snap’s Partner Summit, which gathers developers who use the Snapchat app, as well as its creators and marketers, Snap said it will add an “action bar” to make it easier to navigate the app.

Users will now be able to find local businesses on its Snap Map feature, which will open up new ways for Snap to make money by allowing companies to promote their business, Snap said.

Snapchat, known for photo messages that disappear after being opened, has invested heavily in shows made to be watched on mobile, as well as in-app gaming. On Thursday, it announced 10 new original shows, including “Coach Kev” starring comedian Kevin Hart who will share “daily doses of positivity and wisdom,” and “Queen of Stylez,” a documentary series that follows celebrity hairstylist Tokyo Stylez.

The company also launched Snap Minis, which will allow outside developers to build experiences inside the Snapchat app. For example, popular meditation app Headspace will introduce a mini version inside Snapchat, allowing users to do quick meditations and send encouraging messages to their friends.

Reporting by Sheila Dang; Editing by David Gregorio

Read More

Categories
Alligator shows

Alligator shows up at NASA launch site – WFLA

Lawsuit: Ultra refuses refunds for canceled music festival

MIAMI (AP) — Two men are suing organizers of Ultra Music Festival, claiming they were denied refunds after the the three-day electronic dance music festival in Miami was canceled in March because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Samuel Hernandez, of Miami, and Richard Montoure, of Washington state, filed the lawsuit Tuesday in Miami federal court. They are also seeking class-action status to obtain full refunds, with interest, for thousands of ticketholders from around the world.


Read the Full Article



Walt Disney World to use reservation system when parks reopen

ORANGE COUNTY, Fla. (WFLA) – Theme park fans in Tampa Bay will soon be able to explore central Florida’s abundance of attractions but things will be different than when they closed in March.

Walt Disney World, one of the world’s top tourist destinations, announced its plans Wednesday to reopen its parks in July.


Read the Full Article



Florida wildlife officials use doughnuts to lure city-roaming bear into trap

FORT MYERS, Fla. (AP) — Glazed or jelly? A black bear roaming around a Florida city proved no match for the doughnuts that lured the animal into a humane trap.

The Fort Myers News-Press reports that the juvenile 250-pound (113- kilogram) bear spent a good chunk of Tuesday morning meandering around the Gulf coast city. Wildlife officials say bears tend to move more in the spring in search of mates and, as always, food.


Read the Full Article



Read More

Categories
shows Sunday

Sunday shows preview: States begin to reopen even as some areas in US see case counts increase | TheHill – The Hill

States’ efforts to reopen their economies during the coronavirus are expected to dominate the Sunday show circuit as partisan debates over easing restrictions rage across the country.

All 50 states are in some stage of their reopening, though some states like Georgia and Texas have taken more aggressive actions to allow businesses to open their doors.

President TrumpDonald John TrumpBiden slams Trump in new ad: ‘The death toll is still rising.’ ‘The president is playing golf’ Brazil surpasses Russia with second-highest coronavirus case count in the world Trump slams Sessions: ‘You had no courage & ruined many lives’ MORE and Republicans allies have been vocal in their concerns over the coronavirus’s economic fallout, which has shuttered businesses across the country and sent tens of millions of Americans into unemployment. 

However, a Brookings Institution analysis released this week showed that the coronavirus is spreading into rural counties in the South and Midwest. Many of these counties voted overwhelmingly for Trump over Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonTrump escalates fight against mail-in voting Sunday shows preview: States begin to reopen even as some areas in US see case counts increase The Electoral College is not democratic — nor should it be MORE in 2016. 

From the Trump administration, National security adviser Robert O’Brien will appear on NBC’s “Meet The Press” and CBS’s “Face the Nation” and White House adviser Kevin Hassett will be featured on CNN’s “State of the Union.” 

Deborah Birx, a key member of the White House coronavirus task force, will also be on ABC’s “This week” and “Fox News Sunday.” 

During a White House press briefing this week, Birx said that while Americans need to be cautious and maintain social distancing, they should be able to enjoy their Memorial Day Weekend outside doing outdoor activities such as  hiking or playing golf. 

Democrats and health experts have expressed concerns that the country is reopening too quickly and risks a resurgence in coronavirus cases.

“My concern is that if some areas, city, states or what have you, jump over those various checkpoints and prematurely open up without having the capability of being able to respond effectively and efficiently, my concern is that we will start to see little spikes that might turn into outbreaks,” Anthony FauciAnthony FauciSunday shows preview: States begin to reopen even as some areas in US see case counts increase Science alone can’t tell us whether to open up our states US enters risky new phase of coronavirus fight MORE, the nation’s leading infectious disease expert, said earlier this month.

Gov. Phil Murphy (D-N.J.) and Rep. Val DemingsValdez (Val) Venita DemingsSunday shows preview: States begin to reopen even as some areas in US see case counts increase The Hill’s Morning Report – Presented by Facebook – Mnuchin: More COVID-19 congressional action ahead The Memo: Activists press Biden on VP choice MORE (D-Fla.), whose states have both been hit hard by the pandemic, will be on “State of the Union.”

Here’s the full Sunday show lineup:

ABC’s “This Week” — Birx; former White House homeland security adviser Tom Bossert; Dr. Atul Gawande of Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

NBC’s “Meet the Press” —O’Brien; Gov. Mike DeWine (R-Ohio); Dr. Peter Hotez of Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children’s Hospital; Dr. Dan Barouch of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.

CBS’ “Face the Nation” — O’Brien; former Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff; former FDA Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb; Eric Rosengren, president and CEO of the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston; Geoffrey Ballotti, president and CEO of Wyndham Hotels Group.

CNN’s “State of the Union” — Sen. Rick Scott (R-Fla.); Murphy; Demings; Hassett. 

Fox’s “Fox News Sunday” — Birx; Gov. Asa Hutchinson; R-Ark.; Mark Parkinson, CEO of the American Health Care Association. 

Fox’s “Sunday Morning Futures” – Alex Azar, Secretary of Health and Human Services; Sen. Marsha BlackburnMarsha BlackburnSunday shows preview: States begin to reopen even as some areas in US see case counts increase Commerce Department cracks down on Huawei’s access to chips Senate approves bill to sanction China over Uighur rights MORE (R-Tenn.); Rep. Andy Biggs (R-Ariz.); Matthew Whitaker, Former Acting United States Attorney General; Rep. Devin NunesDevin Gerald NunesSunday shows preview: States begin to reopen even as some areas in US see case counts increase Pass the Primary Care Enhancement Act Trump campaign launches new fundraising program with House Republicans MORE (R-Calif.); Gordon Chang, Asia Analyst and Author of Nuclear Showdown

“America This Week With Eric Bolling” – Megyn Kelly, former Fox News and NBC anchor; Roger StoneRoger Jason StoneSunday shows preview: States begin to reopen even as some areas in US see case counts increase Brzezinski says she arranged call with Twitter CEO to discuss banning Trump Trump taps new prosecutor for DOJ office at center of Flynn, Stone controversies MORE, Trump ally and GOP operative; Rudy GiulianiRudy GiulianiSunday shows preview: States begin to reopen even as some areas in US see case counts increase Moussaoui says he now renounces terrorism, bin Laden Democrats launch probe into Trump’s firing of State Department watchdog, Pompeo MORE, former New York City Mayor; Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulSunday shows preview: States begin to reopen even as some areas in US see case counts increase Congress headed toward unemployment showdown Doctors push Trump to quickly reopen country in letter organized by conservatives MORE (R-Ky.); Sen. Tom CottonThomas (Tom) Bryant CottonSunday shows preview: States begin to reopen even as some areas in US see case counts increase Senate Republicans call on DOJ to investigate Planned Parenthood loans Overnight Defense: Trump to withdraw US from Open Skies Treaty | Pentagon drops ban on recruits who had virus | FBI says Corpus Christi shooting terror-related MORE (R-Ark.); Nunes

Read More

Categories
Moderna shows

Moderna shows promise, coronavirus vaccine remains far off – Los Angeles Times

Somewhere there are eight individuals who can take pride in having contributed to a nearly 1,000-point leap in the Dow Jones industrial average on Monday, as well as a nearly $5-billion one-day leap in the value of an obscure money-losing biotech company called Moderna Inc.

Those eight are the subjects whose early results in a preliminary clinical trial of a COVID-19 vaccine were reported by Moderna on Monday morning. The main goal of the trial was to determine if the vaccine made the subjects seriously ill. For these eight, it didn’t; that’s good news. It also produced useful antibodies in those subjects.

But full results for the other 37 subjects in the Phase 1 trial haven’t been reported. Nor have Moderna’s results been subjected to peer review.

The totality of the science tells us that this is the right antigen and we should be protective.

Dr. Tal Zaks, Moderna Inc.

Still, the scant data reported by Moderna were enough for investors’ hearts to leap up, as the poet Wordsworth recalled reacting upon beholding a rainbow in the sky. Moderna shares closed Monday at $80 in Nasdaq trading, a gain of $13.31, or nearly 20%.

One hates to be the bearer of bad news, which in this case means placing Moderna’s announcement in context, but the truth is that Moderna hasn’t announced a vaccine and the path to developing one remains long and tortuous.

Whether Moderna’s early trial will result in a vaccine, or when, remains highly uncertain; most drugs that deliver promising Phase 1 clinical trial results end up failing in the final analysis. There’s no reason to expect that this one will necessarily buck the odds. Moderna’s vaccine is one of many being tested.

Evidence that the trial vaccine produced antibodies in humans that protect against the coronavirus in the lab is encouraging. But it doesn’t yet warrant terming the vaccine a success. Much could go wrong as the drug undergoes broader testing and its actual protective effect is measured. Then there’s the challenge of manufacturing any vaccine that has been approved and distributing it broadly enough to secure widespread immunity.

What would be grounds for genuine enthusiasm? Certainly trial results showing that a vaccine actually blocked infection by the coronavirus in humans without causing side effects that could sicken patients or even make them more susceptible to infection — outcomes that have happened with vaccines against other diseases.

But that would require large-scale randomized, blind trials — those in which neither the patients nor the researchers know who received the test vaccine and who a placebo. Such trials will be difficult to conduct and not likely to start until the second half of this year at the earliest.

The market’s reaction to Moderna’s news says less about the scientific significance of the announcement than about how much the world, investors or not, is grasping at, or groping for, the barest smidgen of good news in the fight against COVID-19. In scientific terms, of course, the issue is whether this smidgen of good news has legs.

For Moderna, the reaction was spectacular. The Cambridge, Mass., firm has never recorded any revenue from the sale of drugs, only from research grants and the licensing of its early-stage technology to other companies. It has lost more than $1.2 million over the last three years. So a lead role in the quest for a COVID-19 vaccine would boost its fortunes.

Even if Moderna did manage to perfect a vaccine, it’s not entirely clear how much it might profit from the discovery. If a vaccine does appear, the drug industry will be under tremendous pressure to limit its profits in order to ensure nearly universal access to the product.

But the company is dependent on a steady stream of positive news to maintain its stock price, which had nearly quadrupled this year even before Monday’s announcement. Any inkling of a pessimistic result would take all that froth out of the share price.

Moderna’s announcement, it’s proper to observe, came only days after former board member Moncef Slaoui was appointed to lead the White House’s Operation Warp Speed vaccine development initiative. Slaoui resigned from the board to take the unpaid government position. He still holds an estimated $10 million in Moderna stock options, provoking government watchdog groups to warn that he could be embroiled in a conflict of interest as long as he holds the options.

Let’s put Monday’s data in context. Moderna’s announcement didn’t cover such an essential question as whether its vaccine candidate would actually protect humans against the coronavirus that causes COVID-19. It couldn’t, because that wasn’t an outcome the trial was designed to establish. A Phase 3 trial, which would involve many thousands of human subjects, won’t even be launched until July at the earliest, and only then if all intermediate tests go well.

Phase 1 drug trials typically involve a very small number of subjects and are aimed at determining the short-term safety of a drug. In this case, do the subjects tolerate the vaccine — does it make them sick or have troubling side effects — and does it produce antibodies in the subjects’ blood?

Moderna, working with the National Institutes of Health, recruited 45 healthy subjects ages 18 to 55 for the Phase 1 trials. They were divided into three groups receiving doses of 25, 100 and 250 micrograms in two shots 28 days apart.

Thus far, the available results on key antibody production cover only the first eight subjects. There’s no question that those results and others from the preliminary trial were encouraging, as far as that goes. Moderna says that only one of the 45 test subjects experienced redness around the injection site, and only three of the subjects given the highest dose experienced flu-like symptoms. But those disappeared after a day or so.

The finding causing the most excitement was that by 43 days after the first injection, the vaccine appeared to produce “neutralizing antibodies” that appeared to block the coronavirus in four subjects each receiving the lowest doses. Indeed, Moderna says the levels of those antibodies in the eight test subjects were higher than those found in COVID-19 patients who have recovered from the virus.

In the search for a COVID-19 vaccine, neutralizing antibodies are the ballgame. They’re the substances that would protect humans from infection. They’ve been shown to work against the novel coronavirus in mice.

In a conference call Monday morning with Wall Street investment analysts, Moderna executives struggled to hold back their optimism. “The totality of the science tells us that this is the right antigen and we should be protective,” Tal Zaks, Moderna’s chief medical officer, told the analysts.

Zaks said the results answered at least the question of whether a vaccine was even possible against the coronavirus. “These data today take off the table the risk of not being immunogenic or the risk of the antibody type being wrong,” he said. “No, it works, and you’ve seen a demonstration of neutralizing activity.”

But he also said that it may yet be difficult to demonstrate the vaccine’s safety and efficacy in a large randomized trial. In part, that’s because the most important trial, Phase 3, would have to be conducted in coronavirus hot spots where it would be easier to determine that those receiving the vaccine are immunized against the virus.

“If I vaccinate a whole bunch of people — it doesn’t matter how many — if there is no circulating virus in the places where I choose to vaccinate,” Zaks said, “it will be a long time before we know.”

Work on possible vaccines is proceeding worldwide at unprecedented speed. In the U.S., the effort is being overseen by the National Institutes of Health, which has created a system allowing research to proceed along several streamlined paths at once.

“A public-private biomedical research partnership of this scope and scale has never before come together in such a short time frame,” NIH Director Francis S. Collins observed in a statement published Monday. But he cautioned that some aspect of vaccine development can’t be short-circuited, noting that “the earliest possible distribution [is] predicted to be 12 to 18 months away.”

That’s the view of Anthony Fauci, the respected director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, a unit of the NIH, who offered senators the same timeline in recent testimony.

In these unprecedented conditions, it’s understandable to seize on hope anywhere we find it. But it’s also wise to remember that lots of things can go unexpectedly awry, especially under unprecedented conditions.

Read More

Categories
Apple-Branded shows

iOS 14 Leak Shows Off Apple-Branded QR Codes Found in ‘Gobi’ AR App – MacRumors

by

A leaked version of the iOS 14 update has been circulating for a few months, giving us an idea of what Apple is working on behind the scenes for the new update.

Details about iOS 14 have been trickling out, and today, Josh Constine (formerly of TechCrunch) has shared leaked Apple QR codes, details about Apple’s work on an AR app, and sounds for the upcoming Apple Tags in his Moving Product newsletter.

Apple appears to be implementing a new QR code format that uses colored cones, with the files found in the “Gobi” AR app that Apple has been working on. Constine says QR codes open up Mac Pro and Apple Watch websites, the Star Wars: Rogue One movie in iTunes, and the Starbucks Card sign-up.



The code also featured references to a Gobi comparison shopping feature that could be in the AR app, and, in line with previous rumors about a possible Starbucks partnership, there were references to Starbucks discounts at specific locations, which suggests the Gobi app could offer promotions or content experiences based on location.

A video shared by Constine also features sounds and vibrations that will be used in the Find My app to help people locate their lost devices. As described by Constine:

You’ll hear encouraging sounds when you face the right direction so the lost gadget is “Ahead” of you, when you’re “Nearby”, or come within “Arms Reach”, while discouraging tones hint that you’re headed off course.

Many other leaked features have been found in ‌iOS 14‌, such as hints of a new fitness app, new features for Messages like mentions and retractions, new Apple Pencil features, Home screen updates, ‌Find My‌ changes for AirTags, the CarKey API that will allow an iPhone to be used in lieu of a CarKey, and tons more, with full details available in our iOS 14 roundup.

Top Stories

Resolutions and Features of All-OLED iPhone 12 Lineup Detailed in New Report

Monday May 18, 2020 10:43 am PDT by

Apple’s upcoming iPhones will all use flexible OLEDs sourced from either Samsung, BOE, and LG Display, with some new features like 10-bit color expected, according to a report from display analyst Ross Young.
On his site Display Supply Chain Consultants (DSCC), Young details “corrections and confirmations” on what we can expect from Apple’s upcoming 2020 iPhone lineup, which will consist of…

Leaker: Apple to Launch New Low-Cost iPad This Year With A12 Chip

Apple’s eighth-generation iPad will arrive this year and feature an A12 chip, according to an anonymous Twitter account with a thus-far proven track record for forthcoming Apple product leaks.
Apple’s seventh-generation iPad, introduced in September 2019, was an iterative update to the sixth-generation low-cost iPad, with a larger 10.2-inch display and support for new accessories. However,…

Ubisoft Sues Apple and Google Over Distribution of Alleged ‘Ripoff’ Game

Ubisoft Entertainment this week levied a lawsuit against Apple and Google, accusing them of selling a “ripoff” of its popular video game Tom Clancy’s Rainbow Six: Siege, reports Bloomberg.
Ubisoft filed a complaint in federal court in Los Angeles, claiming that the game “Area F2,” developed by Qookka Games, is a “near carbon copy” of Tom Clancy’s Rainbow Six: Siege, aiming to “piggyback”…

China Threatens to Add Apple, Other US Companies to ‘Unreliable Entity List’

China could put Apple on an “unreliable entity list” alongside other U.S. companies, in a series of punitive countermeasures the country is prepared to take against U.S. moves to block shipments of semiconductors to Huawei, claimed a report over the weekend.
According to the Global Times, the Chinese government’s mouthpiece, the list would be a first step toward launching a series of…

Apple Reopening 25 US Stores and 12 in Canada This Week

Apple will reopen more than 25 stores across the U.S. and 12 stores in Canada this week, reports Bloomberg’s Mark Gurman. The decision follows a published letter on Sunday from the company’s senior VP of retail, Deirdre O’Brien, detailing the safety measures that Apple is taking as it gradually re-opens stores across the globe. These include temperature checks conducted at the door, limited …

Deals: Apple’s AirPods Pro Drop to New Low Price of $219 at Verizon ($30 Off)

Verizon continues to lower the price of Apple’s AirPods Pro, now offering the Bluetooth headphones for $219.99, down from an original price of $249.00. This is $5 under AT&T’s current price on the headphones, and the lowest price we have ever seen for new AirPods Pro to date.
Note: MacRumors is an affiliate partner with Verizon. When you click a link and make a purchase, we may receive a small …



Read More

Categories
shows Study

Study shows loud talking can generate over 1000 respiratory droplets — but experts say 6 feet is still sufficient to protect against the coronavirus – AOL

COVID-19 has earned a reputation for being a highly infectious virus, and a new study only emphasizes that.

The study, which was published Tuesday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, recruited volunteers and asked them to repeat the phrase “stay healthy” several times into the open end of a cardboard box. While they were doing this, the researchers used laser light technology to track the respiratory droplets that were generated while the study participants spoke.

When they analyzed the data, the researchers found that about 2,600 droplets a second were created when people talked. And the louder people spoke, the larger the droplets and the more of them were produced.

The researchers didn’t specifically test people who had COVID-19, but they combined their findings with previous research on the respiratory droplets produced by people who were hospitalized with the virus. By combining all that data, the researchers estimated that a person infected with COVID-19 could produce at least 1,000 respiratory droplets that contained the virus.

110 PHOTOS

Coronavirus in the United States

See Gallery

Olga Karamalak puts the finishing touches on a Mother’s Day flower arraignment at Relles Florist in Sacramento, Calif., Tuesday, May 5, 2020. Florists are among the retail businesses that Gov. Gavin Newsom said might be eligible to open before the end of this week under upcoming state guidelines on the coronavirus. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)

MTA officials work on trains for the disinfecting operations at the Coney Island Stillwell Avenue Terminal Wednesday, May 6, 2020, in the Brooklyn borough of New York. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

Employees wait to hear President Donald Trump speak after a tour of a Honeywell International plant that manufactures personal protective equipment, Tuesday, May 5, 2020, in Phoenix. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

A shopper in a face mask looks over cuts of beef piled up in a cold room for purchase at a Costco warehouse store Tuesday, May 5, 2020, in west Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

Bhagirathi Savage pays the cymbals at 7 o’clock, Tuesday evening, May 5, 2020 in the Queens borough of New York. She is part of a community of devotees of the late Indian guru Sri Chinmoy that gathers each evening to salute those on the frontlines of the coronavirus pandemic. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

A fisherman casts into the surf Tuesday, May 5, 2020, in Huntington Beach, Calif. California Gov. Gavin Newsom’s administration gave approval Tuesday to plans by Huntington Beach and two smaller cities to reopen beaches that fell under his order shutting down the entire Orange County coast after a heat wave drew large crowds to the shore. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)

Emory Hospital RN Aisha Bennett takes a nasal swab at a pilot large scale drive-through COVID-19 testing site in the Georgia International Horse Park on Thursday, April 16, 2020, in Conyers, Ga. Testing is by appointment only and open to anyone in the general public who believes they are ill with COVID-19. According to Chad Wasdin, communications director for the Gwinnett Rockdale Newton Health Departments, due to increased testing capacity 400 appointments are scheduled for anyone who thinks they may be ill with the virus. While the Health Department requires a scheduled appointment to test individuals, referral from a doctor is not necessary. There is no charge for the testing, and those tested do not need to provide health insurance information. “We look forward to piloting this large-scale test site,” said Dr. Audrey Arona, district health director and CEO of Gwinnett, Newton and Rockdale County Health Departments. “This is a fantastic collaboration between Rockdale and Newton county governments, their EMAs, and the Health Department. Testing will provide individuals in the community an opportunity to learn if their illness is consistent with the COVID-19 virus, and it will help us improve our plans for providing large-scale testing. (Curtis Compton/Atlanta Journal-Constitution via AP)

BROOKLYN, NEW YORK, UNITED STATES – 2020/04/21: People wearing face masks as a preventive measure, line up at one of NYC new testing tents outside Gotham Health in East New York amid the coronavirus outbreak.
The Mayor of New York City, Bill de Blasio announced new testing facilities in low income communities where the coronavirus has hit the hardest. (Photo by Braulio Jatar/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)

A woman looks to get information about job application in front of IDES (Illinois Department of Employment Security) WorkNet center in Arlington Heights, Ill., Thursday, April 9, 2020. Another 6.6 million people filed for unemployment benefits last week, according to the US Department of Labor, as American workers continue to suffer from devastating job losses, furloughs and reduced hours during the coronavirus pandemic. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

NEW YORK, UNITED STATES – 2020/04/21: Oculus mall and transportation hub stays virtually empty because of COVID-19 pandemic at World Trade Center. (Photo by Lev Radin/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images)

ALTAMONTE SPRINGS, UNITED STATES – APRIL 21, 2020: Health workers speak to a man with a bicycle after testing him for COVID-19 at a mobile testing site at the Apostolic Church of Christ in a historic black neighborhood in Seminole County. State and county health officials are offering free tests at six historic black neighbourhoods to help residents who are unable to drive to a health clinic or may be unable to afford health insurance.- PHOTOGRAPH BY Paul Hennessy / Echoes Wire/ Barcroft Studios / Future Publishing (Photo credit should read Paul Hennessy / Echoes Wire/Barcroft Media via Getty Images)

Volunteers at the Islamic Society of Central Florida distribute food from the Second Harvest Food Bank of Central Florida to needy families during a drive-thru event on April 9, 2020 in Orlando, Florida. The food bank has seen record demand for assistance in the Orlando area due to job losses caused by the coronavirus pandemic. (Photo by Paul Hennessy/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

USS Intrepid is seen with blue lights on April 9, 2020 in New York City, USA., Landmarks across the United States are Illuminated In Blue To Honor Essential Workers with the hashtag “Light it Blue” (Photo by John Nacion/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

NEW ORLEANS, LA – APRIL 09: Some residents are attempting to bring some Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic by dressing as the Easter Bunny and walking the Lakeview neighborhood in preparation for Easter on April 09, 2020, in New Orleans, LA. (Photo by Stephen Lew/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)

NEW YORK, NY – APRIL 09: A Building in Times Square, displaying a thank you message to those fighting for our lives, is reflected in a puddle amid the coronavirus pandemic on April 9, 2020 in New York City. COVID-19 has spread to most countries around the world, claiming 96,000 lives with infections at 1.6 million people. (Photo by John Lamparski/Getty Images)

WASHINGTON, DC APRIL 09:
Geoff Gilbert (left), Madhvi Venkatraman(CQ)(center), and Megan Macaraeg, help undocumented immigrants who are in need of help during the pandemic covid19 in Columbia Heights in Washington, DC on April 09, 2020.
(Photo by Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

NEW YORK, USA – APRIL 7: Empire State Building lights up like an ambulance to honor emergency healthcare workers responding to the new type of coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic in New York City, United States on April 7, 2020. (Photo by Tayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)

NEW YORK, NY – APRIL 7: Three medical workers wearing gloves and face masks stand at the entrance to the Maimonides Medical Center in the on April 7, 2020 in the Borough Park neighborhood of the Brooklyn borough of New York City. New York City has more than 74,000 confirmed cases of COVID-19, including more than 3,500 deaths, according to published reports. (Photo by Pablo Monsalve/VIEWpress via Getty Images)”n

NEW YORK, New York – APRIL 07: A view of the “Police Line- Do Not Cross” tape marking the parameter of a temporary field hospital to treat covid-19 patients set up in Central Park by “Samaritans purse” a charitable organization working with Mount Sinai. on April 07, 2020 in New York City, United States. COVID-19 has spread to most countries around the world, claiming over 80,000 lives with over 1.4 million infections. (Photo by Roy Rochlin/Getty Images)

NEW YORK, UNITED STATES – APRIL 7, 2020: Hospital workers wheel out bodies to be stored in a portable morgue outside Brooklyn Hospital. New York had its highest 24 hour death toll with 731 people dying of the corona virus, however hospitalization seems to be going down.- PHOTOGRAPH BY Braulio Jatar / Echoes WIre/ Barcroft Studios / Future Publishing (Photo credit should read Braulio Jatar / Echoes Wire/Barcroft Media via Getty Images)

WEST COVINA, CA – APRIL 07: Karina Pantoja, left, community home dental coordinator along with Dentist Dr. Rosette El Rehab screens people during Coronavirus testing by the city of West Covina and AltaMed in West Covina on Tuesday, April 07, 2020. (Photo by Keith Birmingham/MediaNews Group/Pasadena Star-News via Getty Images)

BOSTON, MA – APRIL 8: Boston Mayor Marty Walsh speaks at a press briefing on the city’s efforts battling the coronavirus pandemic outside City Hall in Boston on Apr. 7, 2020. He wore a New England Patriots protective face mask. (Photo by Matthew J. Lee/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)

WASHINGTON, DC – APRIL 07: A “Station Closed” sign is hung at the gate of Federal Triangle Metro Station April 7, 2020 in Washington, DC. Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority announced that it is cutting late night service and closing all Metro stations at 9pm daily until further notice due to lower ridership in the COVID-19 outbreak. Nineteen Metro stations had already been closed prior to the service cut. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Residents of the Sunrise at FlatIrons assisted living facility participated in a “social distancing” workout from their balconies or in the common area on Tuesday, April 07, 2020, in Broomfield, Colo. Senior living facilities across the state are currently quarantining residents as a precaution to the current coronavirus pandemic. (Photo by Jeremy Papasso/MediaNews Group/Boulder Daily Camera via Getty Images)

NEW JERSEY, USA – APRIL 7: A general view of empty city from Eagle Rock Reservation Park during the new type of coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic in New Jersey, United States on April 7, 2020. (Photo by Islam Dogru/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)

NEW YORK, New York – APRIL 07: A Skater on roller blades wears a surgical mask on the West Side Highway Bike Path in front of the USNS Comfort which is docked on pier 90, in Manhattan on April 07, 2020 in New York City, United States. COVID-19 has spread to most countries around the world, claiming over 80,000 lives with over 1.4 million infections. (Photo by Roy Rochlin/Getty Images)

Reading, PA – March 26: A Stay Strong sign has been erected in the cloverleaf at the Penn Street exit of Route 422, in Reading, PA Thursday, March 26, 2020, to offer encouragement in the coronavirus epidemic.(Photo by Bill Uhrich/MediaNews Group/Reading Eagle via Getty Images)

UNITED STATES – MARCH 27: Rep. Tom Malinowski, D-N.J., walks down the House steps as the House votes on the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act in Washington on Friday, March 27, 2020. (Photo by Caroline Brehman/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images)

NEW YORK, USA – MARCH 25: A patient with a face mask is seen at the Maimonides Medical Center in Brooklyn, New York, United States on March 25, 2020. The coronavirus-related deaths in the U.S. topped 800 on Wednesday, while the number of cases reached over 55,200, according to latest figures by Johns Hopkins University. (Photo by Tayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)

NEW YORK, NY – MARCH 27: A New York Police officer wears a face mask as he directs traffic on a local street on March 27, 2020 in New York City. At least 350 members of the New York City Police Department including deputy commissioner John Miller were confirmed to have the virus. (Photo by Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/Getty Images)

NEW YORK, NY – MARCH 27: A New York Police officer wears a face mask as he directs traffic on a local street on March 27, 2020 in New York City. At least 350 members of the New York City Police Department including deputy commissioner John Miller were confirmed to have the virus. (Photo by Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/Getty Images)

WASHINGTON, DC – MARCH 27: U.S. Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) talks with reporters as she arrives at the U.S. Capitol on March 27, 2020 in Washington, DC. The House of Representatives is scheduled to vote today on the stimulus bill intended to combat the economic effects caused by the coronavirus pandemic. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

NEW YORK, NY – MARCH 27: People cross Park Av. after it was announced that some streets will be shut as lockdown continues in response to the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreakon March 27, 2020 in New York City. Mayor Bill de Blasio chose four streets across four boroughs to test whether shutting down streets to vehicular traffic would increase social distancing among pedestrians during the COVID-19 pandemic shutdown. (Photo by Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/Getty Images)

FLORIDA, USA – MARCH 20: Paramedics dressed in hazmat suits assist the evacuation of cruiseships crew members with respiratory symptoms associated with coronavirus (COVID-19) at the Coast Guardâs Miami Beach station, in Miami, Florida, United States on March 26, 2020. (Photo by MARCO BELLO/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)

FLORIDA, USA – MARCH 20: An ambulance is seen during the evacuation of cruiseships crew members with respiratory symptoms associated with coronavirus (COVID-19) at the Coast Guardâs Miami Beach station, in Miami, Florida, United States on March 26, 2020. (Photo by MARCO BELLO/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)

Reading, PA – March 26: (L-R) Siblings Azuleirys Francisco, 10, Alexander Francisco, 6, and Jovani Francisco, 8, sanitize their hands as a precaution against coronavirus while picking up meals from the parking lot at 4th and Windsor in Reading, PA Thursday afternoon Thursday March 26, 2020. The site is run by Olivets and the Reading School District.(Photo by Lauren A. Little/MediaNews Group/Reading Eagle via Getty Images)

Amity twp., PA – March 26: The sign for Hope Church in Amity Township that reads “Social Distancing, Join us online…” Thursday afternoon March 26, 2020.(Photo by Ben Hasty/MediaNews Group/Reading Eagle via Getty Images)

A woman poses for a photo with her dog in a mostly empty Times Square, New York, US, on March 25, 2020. (Photo by John Lamparski/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

NEW YORK, USA – MARCH 25: A view of empty road in Brooklyn, New York, United States on March 25, 2020. The coronavirus-related deaths in the U.S. topped 800 on Wednesday, while the number of cases reached over 55,200, according to latest figures by Johns Hopkins University. (Photo by Tayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)

A sign is displayed at a coffee shop on March 25, 2020 in New York City. – The number of confirmed cases of the new coronavirus in the United States reached 60,115 on Wednesday while 827 people had died, a tracker run by Johns Hopkins University showed. (Photo by Angela Weiss / AFP) (Photo by ANGELA WEISS/AFP via Getty Images)

NEW YORK, NY – MARCH 25: Basketball courts are seen empty due to coronavirus spread on March 25, 2020 in New York City, New York. Across the country schools, businesses and places of work have either been shut down or are restricting hours of operation as health officials try to slow the spread of COVID-19. (Photo by Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/Getty Images)

SAN FRANCISCO, CA, USA – MARCH 18: Shoppers at Walgreens in San Franciscoâs Castro District make last minute purchases minutes before the shelter in place directive was to take effect on March 18, 2020. (Photo by Neal Waters/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)

SAN JOSE, CA, USA – MARCH 18: A Safeway store in San Jose posts new shorter store hours to provide a safer work environment ahead of Tuesdayâs directive to shelter in place for residents of the six counties that make up the Bay Area, on March 18, 2020. (Photo by Neal Waters/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)

SAN FRANCISCO, CA, USA – MARCH 18: Mounted officers patrol the area outside Pier 39 in San Francisco on day one of the shelter in place order on March 18, 2020. (Photo by Neal Waters/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)

MANASSAS, USA – MARCH 17: Weapons on display at a gun shop in Manassas, Virginia, United States as gun and ammunition sales in the U.S. have skyrocketed as the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic spread across the country. (Photo by Yasin Ozturk/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)

A security officer stands guard at a tent set up outside the emergency room at an AdventHealth hospital on March 17, 2020 in Orlando, Florida. The tent is part of AdventHealth’s surge planning in case extra space is needed to care for potential coronavirus cases in the community. (Photo by Paul Hennessy/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

A tent is seen set up outside the emergency room at an AdventHealth hospital on March 17, 2020 in Orlando, Florida. The tent is part of AdventHealth’s surge planning in case extra space is needed to care for potential coronavirus cases in the community. (Photo by Paul Hennessy/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

External and outside of emergency room views of the pandemic, novel Coronavirus, or COVID-19 are seen at Advocate Lutheran General Hospital on March 17, 2020 in Park Ridge, Illinois, United States. The collection includes additional tents, a warning construction sign, an empty road, a congested road, a law enforcement vehicle, and a drive through testing area. (Photo by Patrick Gorski/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

NEWTON, MA – MARCH 17: Medical professionals work in coronavirus testing tents at Newton Wellesley Hospital in Newton, MA on March 17, 2020. (Photo by Suzanne Kreiter/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)

BOSTON, MA – MARCH 17: An emergency tent is set up at the Carney Hospital in Boston’s Dorchester for coronavirus pandemic use on March 17, 2020. (Photo by David L. Ryan/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)

LEONARDTOWN, MARYLAND – MARCH 17: Nurses screen patients for COVID-19 virus testing at a drive-up location outside Medstar St. Mary’s Hospital on March 17, 2020 in Leonardtown, Maryland. The facility is one of the first in the Washington, DC area to offer coronavirus testing as more than 5,200 cases have been confirmed in the United States, and more than 90 deaths have been attributed to the virus. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

A sign on a table provides instructions for social distancing, while a group of people are seen in the background, selective focus, sitting around a small table, at a hospital in San Francisco during an outbreak of the COVID-19 coronavirus, California, March 16, 2020. (Photo by Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images)

NEWTON, MA – MARCH, 16: Nurse practitioner Amy Israelian puts on protective gear in a tent in the parking lot of the Newton-Wellesley Hospital before testing a possible coronavirus patient in Newton, MA on March 16, 2020. (Photo by Adam Glanzman/For The Washington Post via Getty Images)

Two staff members wheel Amwell telemedicine carts into the entrance of the University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Benioff Children’s Hospital in Mission Bay, San Francisco, California during an outbreak of the COVID-19 coronavirus, March 16, 2020. As a result of the outbreak, patients are increasingly being asked to conduct telemedicine appointments to avoid infecting healthcare workers. (Photo by Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images)

People line up to enter a triage tent outside of the emergency room at Memorial West Hospital in Pembroke Pines, Fla., on Monday, March 16, 2020. (Matias J. Ocner/Miami Herald/Tribune News Service via Getty Images)

WESTMINSTER, MARYLAND – MARCH 16: Dawn Canova, clinical manager for outpatient wound care at Carroll Hospital, takes off her protective gloves after taking a sample to test a person for the coronavirus at a drive-thru station in the hospital’s parking garage March 16, 2020 in Westminster, Maryland. Not open to the general public for testing, the station was set up to take samples from people who had spoken with their doctors and received explicit direction to get a test for the novel coronavirus called COVID-19. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

WESTMINSTER, MARYLAND – MARCH 16: Carroll Hospital Critical Care Unit Clinical Manager Stephanie Bakert talks to a person through his car window using a mobile phone before testing him for the coronavirus at a drive-thru station in the hospital’s parking garage March 16, 2020 in Westminster, Maryland. Not open to the general public for testing, the station was set up to take samples from people who had spoken with their doctors and received explicit direction to get a test for the novel coronavirus called COVID-19. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

NEW YORK, NY – MARCH 15: An exterior view of Lenox Hill Hospital as the coronavirus continues to spread across the United States on March 15, 2020 in New York City. The World Health Organization declared coronavirus (COVID-19) a global pandemic on March 11th. (Photo by Cindy Ord/Getty Images)

NEW YORK, NY – MARCH 15: Passengers disembark from the Norwegian Bliss cruise ship on March 15, 2020 in New York City. Mayor Bill de Blasio said on Tuesday that any cruise ship passenger disembarking in New York City with a temperature over 100.4 will be given the choice of self-isolating at home or be taken to a hospital to protect against the spread of COVID-19. (Photo by Stephanie Keith/Getty Images)

DAYTON, WA – MARCH 14: Dr. Lewis Neace, head of the ER at Dayton General Hospital poses for a photograph. Dayton, a small town in rural southeast Washington has an aging population, had its first positive test for Coronavirus and is waiting on results of more tests. (Photo by Nick Otto for the Washington Post)

NEW YORK, NEW YORK – MARCH 14: An exterior view of Harlem Hospital Center, aka NYC Health + Hospitals/Harlem, as the coronavirus continues to spread across the United States on March 14, 2020 in New York City. The World Health Organization declared coronavirus (COVID-19) a global pandemic on March 11th. (Photo by Dia Dipasupil/Getty Images)

JACKSONVILLE, FL – MARCH 14: A general view of the Ascension St. Vincent’s Riverside Hospital on March 14, 2020 in Jacksonville, Florida. The World Health Organization (WHO) declared Coronavirus (COVID-19) a pandemic. (Photo by Cliff Hawkins/Getty Images)

Un puñado de personas transitan la terminal de Grand Central en Nueva York el 23 de marzo del 2020. Normalmente hay multitudes en la estación, pero muy poca gente está viajando como consecuencia del coronavirus. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

A sign displaying messages on how to reduce the spread of COVID-19, the disease caused by the new coronavirus, is displayed at the mouth of the Manhattan Bridge, Monday, March 23, 2020, in the Brooklyn borough of New York. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

NEW PALTZ, NY – MARCH 22: A highway information display says, “STOP THE SPREAD SAVE LIVES” on a mostly empty Interstate 87 on Sunday afternoon. The highway was mostly empty on the same day that New York State Governor Andrew Cuomo pleads with New York residents to take the stay-at-home orders seriously regarding the Coronavirus pandemic. Photographed in New Paltz, New York on March 22, 2020, USA. (Photo by Ira L. Black/Corbis via Getty Images)

People are seen lining up for testing Covid-19 in Elmhurst Queens to test for Coronavirus, on March 21, 2020. (Photo by John Nacion/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

People are seen lining up for testing Covid-19 in Elmhurst Queens to test for Coronavirus, on March 21, 2020. (Photo by John Nacion/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

STONY BROOK, NEW YORK – MARCH 21: A sign direct people to a COVID-19 test facility at Stony Brook University on March 21, 2020 in Stony Brook, New York. The World Health Organization declared coronavirus (COVID-19) a global pandemic on March 11th. (Photo by Bruce Bennett/Getty Images)

US President Donald Trump and other members of the task force listen as National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Director, Dr. Anthony Fauci, speaks during the daily briefing on the novel coronavirus, COVID-19, at the White House on March 21, 2020, in Washington, DC. (Photo by JIM WATSON / AFP) (Photo by JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty Images)

Women wear face masks a a scarf to protect their mouths and nose as they walk along 34th St., Friday, March 20, 2020, in New York. New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo is ordering all workers in non-essential businesses to stay home and banning gatherings statewide. “Only essential businesses can have workers commuting to the job or on the job,” Cuomo said of an executive order he will sign Friday. Nonessential gatherings of individuals of any size or for any reason are canceled or postponed. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

A subway customer wears protective gloves on an empty car as it stops at a sparsely populated 57th Street station due to COVID-19 concerns, Friday, March 20, 2020, in New York. Gov. Andrew Cuomo is ordering all workers in non-essential businesses to stay home and banning gatherings statewide. “Only essential businesses can have workers commuting to the job or on the job,” Cuomo said of an executive order on Friday. Nonessential gatherings of individuals of any size or for any reason are canceled or postponed. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

A postal worker wears a protective mask and gloves while operating a route in the Queens borough of New York, Friday, March 20, 2020. Gov. Andrew Cuomo is ordering all workers in non-essential businesses to stay home and banning gatherings statewide. “Only essential businesses can have workers commuting to the job or on the job,” Cuomo said of an executive order he will sign Friday. Nonessential gatherings of individuals of any size or for any reason are canceled or postponed. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

A Red Robin reastaurant in Tigard, Ore., has closed some tables in order to maintain ‘social distancing’ between diners per CDC guidelines Sunday, March 15, 2020. They said they were running the place at 50 percent capacity so they could leave tables empty between customers. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus)

A commuter pauses to read a video display on the Gallery Place Metro subway train platform in Washington, Friday, March 13, 2020, with a message from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on the proper way to wash your hands to combat the coronavirus outbreak. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

US Vice President Mike Pence, flanked by CDC Director Robert R. Redfield (L) and FEMA Administrator Peter Gaynor, shows documents to reporters during the daily briefing on the novel coronavirus, COVID-19, at the White House on March 22, 2020, in Washington, DC. (Photo by Eric BARADAT / AFP) (Photo by ERIC BARADAT/AFP via Getty Images)

An electronic billboard sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) provides tips for the public on ways to prevent the spread of coronavirus (COVID-19) on March 20, 2020 along Interstate 4 in Deland, Florida. (Photo by Paul Hennessy/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

Street performer Eddie Webb looks around the nearly deserted French Quarter looking to make money in New Orleans, Sunday, March 22, 2020. With much of the city already hunkered down due to the coronavirus pandemic, Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards issues a shelter-in-place order to take effect starting Monday at 5:00 PM. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

A sign to draw customers is seen outside the nearly empty Superior Seafood and Oyster Bar in New Orleans, Thursday, March 19, 2020. Louisiana Governor John Bel Edwards and New Orleans Mayor LaToya Cantrell have ordered all restaurants and bars to close except for takeout, and asked residents to remain home and maintain social distancing from others when outside, due to the COVID-19 virus pandemic. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

Kamari Fletcher waits for her to-go order inside the nearly empty Superior Seafood and Oyster Bar in New Orleans, Thursday, March 19, 2020. Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards and New Orleans Mayor Latoya Cantrell have ordered all restaurants and bars to close except for takeout, and asked residents to remain home and maintain social distancing from others when outside, due to the coronavirus pandemic. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

A shuttered business is seen in the French Quarter in New Orleans on March 26, 2020, during the coronavirus outbreak. – New Orleans, the Louisiana city known as the “Big Easy” famed for its jazz and nightlife, has become an epicenter of the coronavirus pandemic gripping the United States. The southern US state now has 2,305 confirmed cases and 83 deaths. New Orleans alone accounts for 997 of the cases and 46 of the deaths. (Photo by Emily Kask / 30203169A / AFP) (Photo by EMILY KASK/30203169A/AFP via Getty Images)

Words from Gloria Gaynor’s “I Will Survive” are painted onto plywood covering the window of a closed business during the coronavirus outbreak in New Orleans on March 26, 2020. – New Orleans, the Louisiana city known as the “Big Easy” famed for its jazz and nightlife, has become an epicenter of the coronavirus pandemic gripping the United States. The southern US state now has 2,305 confirmed cases and 83 deaths. New Orleans alone accounts for 997 of the cases and 46 of the deaths. (Photo by Emily Kask / 30203169A / AFP) (Photo by EMILY KASK/30203169A/AFP via Getty Images)

A closure note is posted on the family-owned Bar Redux in the Bywater in New Orleans on March 26, 2020. – New Orleans, the Louisiana city known as the “Big Easy” famed for its jazz and nightlife, has become an epicenter of the coronavirus pandemic gripping the United States. The southern US state now has 2,305 confirmed cases and 83 deaths. New Orleans alone accounts for 997 of the cases and 46 of the deaths. (Photo by Emily Kask / 30203169A / AFP) (Photo by EMILY KASK/30203169A/AFP via Getty Images)

A shuttered business is pictured on Decatur Street in New Orleans, Louisiana, on March 26, 2020. – New Orleans, the Louisiana city known as the “Big Easy” famed for its jazz and nightlife, has become an epicenter of the coronavirus pandemic gripping the United States. The southern US state now has 2,305 confirmed cases and 83 deaths. New Orleans alone accounts for 997 of the cases and 46 of the deaths. (Photo by Emily Kask / 30203169A / AFP) (Photo by EMILY KASK/30203169A/AFP via Getty Images)

A shuttered restaurant is pictured in the French Quarter in New Orleans, Louisiana, on March 26, 2020. – New Orleans, the Louisiana city known as the “Big Easy” famed for its jazz and nightlife, has become an epicenter of the coronavirus pandemic gripping the United States. The southern US state now has 2,305 confirmed cases and 83 deaths. New Orleans alone accounts for 997 of the cases and 46 of the deaths. (Photo by Emily Kask / 30203169A / AFP) (Photo by EMILY KASK/30203169A/AFP via Getty Images)

National Guard members walk down Rampart Street in New Orleans, Louisiana, on March 26, 2020. – New Orleans, the Louisiana city known as the “Big Easy” famed for its jazz and nightlife, has become an epicenter of the coronavirus pandemic gripping the United States. The southern US state now has 2,305 confirmed cases and 83 deaths. New Orleans alone accounts for 997 of the cases and 46 of the deaths. (Photo by Emily Kask / 30203169A / AFP) (Photo by EMILY KASK/30203169A/AFP via Getty Images)

Stony Brook, N.Y.: State workers and members of the National Guard check in people arriving for the drive-thru coronavirus testing at Stony brook University in New York on March 25, 2020. (Photo by John Paraskevas/Newsday RM via Getty Images)

Gov. Brad Little issues a statewide stay-at-home order to further prevent spread of coronavirus COVID-19 at a press conference Wednesday, March 25, 2020 held at Gowen Field, headquarters of the Idaho Army National Guard in Boise, Idaho. (Darin Oswald/Idaho Statesman/Tribune News Service via Getty Images)

A Healthcare worker help to check in with the assistant from the Florida Army National Guard as vehicles line up at the COVID-19 drive-thru testing center at Marlins Park as the coronavirus pandemic continues on Wednesday, March 25, 2020 in Miami. (David Santiago/Miami Herald/Tribune News Service via Getty Images)

A Healthcare worker help to check in with the assistant from the Florida Army National Guard as vehicles line up at the COVID-19 drive-thru testing center at Marlins Park as the coronavirus pandemic continues on Wednesday, March 25, 2020 in Miami. (David Santiago/Miami Herald/Tribune News Service via Getty Images)

WASHINGTON, DC – MARCH 26: (L-R) U.S. President Donald Trump and National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Director Anthony Fauci arrive for a briefing on the coronavirus pandemic in the press briefing room of the White House on March 26, 2020 in Washington, DC. The U.S. House of Representatives is scheduled to vote Friday on the $2 trillion stimulus package to combat the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

WASHINGTON, DC – MARCH 26: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Director Anthony Fauci listens as U.S. President Donald Trump speaks during a briefing on the coronavirus pandemic, in the press briefing room of the White House on March 26, 2020 in Washington, DC. After the U.S. House of Representatives votes on Friday, President Trump is expected to sign the $2 trillion stimulus package to combat the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

WASHINGTON, DC – MARCH 25: Flanked by National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Director Anthony Fauci (L) and White House coronavirus response coordinator Deborah Birx, Vice President Mike Pence speaks during a briefing on the coronavirus pandemic, in the press briefing room of the White House on March 25, 2020 in Washington, DC. The United States Senate continues to work on a $2 trillion aide package to combat the health and economic effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

BLOOMINGTON, UNITED STATES – MARCH 26, 2020: A volunteer puts on gloves before participating in the Monroe County Food Train to give meals, and groceries to youth 18 and under, during the COVID-19/Coronavirus emergency in Bloomington. Hundreds of workers have been laid off in the community, and the governor has issued a stay-at-home order.- PHOTOGRAPH BY Jeremy Hogan / Echoes Wire/ Barcroft Studios / Future Publishing (Photo credit should read Jeremy Hogan / Echoes Wire/Barcroft Media via Getty Images)

BOSTON, MA – MARCH 26: Secretary of Health and Human Services Marylou Sudders and Gov. Charlie Baker hold a press conference in the Gardner Auditorium at The Massachusetts State House in Boston on March 26, 2020. Baker and Sudders addressed attempting to secure more pieces of personal protection equipment and mobile schooling concerns. (Photo by Blake Nissen/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)

The Magic Bag theater is pictured closed, due to Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer’s measures to stop the spread of COVID 19 in Ferndale, Michigan on March 26, 2020. (Photo by JEFF KOWALSKY / AFP) (Photo by JEFF KOWALSKY/AFP via Getty Images)

A Great Clips hair salon sign is pictured as it’s closed, due to Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer’s measures to stop the spread of COVID 19 in Ferndale, Michigan on March 26, 2020. (Photo by JEFF KOWALSKY / AFP) (Photo by JEFF KOWALSKY/AFP via Getty Images)

A closed sign is seen on the Suburban Buick GMC that is currently closed by Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer to stop the spread of coronavirus,COVID-19, in Ferndale, Michigan on March 26, 2020. – President Donald Trump, keen for an early lifting of economically costly social distancing measures against the coronavirus, said he would propose dividing the United States by risk levels. In a letter to state governors released by the White House, Trump said that better testing now allows the mapping of virus threat on a local level. (Photo by JEFF KOWALSKY / AFP) (Photo by JEFF KOWALSKY/AFP via Getty Images)

BOSTON, MA – MARCH 26: The Boston Public Garden on March 26, 2020 in Boston, United States. Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker required all non-essential businesses to close on Tuesday and requested the population to stay home as much as possible. (Photo by Scott Eisen/Getty Images)

METHUEN, MA – MARCH 25: A sign in front of the Donald P. Timony Grammar School in Methuen, MA reminds students and parents to check their email often for updates on March 25, 2020. Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker announced that schools in the state will remained closed until at least May 4 in response to the coronavirus emergency. The announcement came as state public health officials reported that the total number of coronavirus-related deaths had risen to 15, up from 11 the day before. Officials reported 679 new confirmed cases of the disease, bringing the tally in Massachusetts to 1,838, up from 1,159. Officials said 19,794 people had been tested as of Wednesday, up from 13,749. (Photo by Jim Davis/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)

A Los Angeles traffic officer wear a mask as he directs traffic on March 24, 2020. – In California, already under orders to stay home because of the coronavirus outbreak, Governor Gavin Newsom tightened the lockdown to shut parking lots at beaches and parks after tens of thousands flouted social distancing rules. (Photo by Frederic J. BROWN / AFP) (Photo by FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP via Getty Images)

SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA – MARCH 24: Members of the California National Guard 115th Regional Support Group help pack boxes of food at the Second Harvest Food Bank of Silicon Valley on March 24, 2020 in San Jose, California. California Gov. Gavin Newsom has deployed the California National Guard to help distribute food at food banks across the state that have seen a huge decline in volunteers that usually help sort and pack food for the needy. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

A woman walks through an almost-deserted Times Square in the early morning hours on April 23, 2020 in New York City. – Job losses from the coronavirus pandemic deepened last week with data Thursday showing another 4.4 million US workers filed new claims for jobless benefits, bringing the total to 26.4 million since mid-March. (Photo by Johannes EISELE / AFP) (Photo by JOHANNES EISELE/AFP via Getty Images)

A woman crosses a quiet intersection Wednesday night, April 22, 2020, in the Bronx borough of New York during the coronavirus outbreak. As President Donald Trump aims for a swift nationwide reopening, he faces a new challenge: convincing people it’s safe to come out and resume their normal lives. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

Members of the NYPD attend the funeral of Traffic Section Commander Mohammed Chowdhury in New York, Wednesday, April 22, 2020. Chowdhury died on Sunday, April 19, 2020, from complications related to the new coronavirus. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

Members of the NYPD Honor Guard, wearing masks, carry the casket of Traffic Section Commander Mohammed Chowdhury during his funeral in New York, Wednesday, April 22, 2020. Chowdhury died on Sunday, April 19, 2020, from complications related to the new coronavirus. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

Mourners wearing personal protective equipment watch as the casket of Traffic Section Commander Mohammed Chowdhury is loaded into a hearse during his funeral in New York, Wednesday, April 22, 2020. Chowdhury died on Sunday, April 19, 2020, from complications related to the new coronavirus. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

Photo by: John Nacion/STAR MAX/IPx 2020 4/22/20 Life in New York City during the covid-19 pandemic.

Photo by: John Nacion/STAR MAX/IPx 2020 4/22/20 Life in New York City during the covid-19 pandemic.

Protesters stand on the steps of the Michigan State Capitol in Lansing, Mich., Wednesday, April 15, 2020. Flag-waving, honking protesters drove past the Michigan Capitol on Wednesday to show their displeasure with Gov. Gretchen Whitmer’s orders to keep people at home and businesses locked during the new coronavirus COVID-19 outbreak. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

A passenger in a vehicle holds a sign during a protest at the State Capitol in Lansing, Mich., Wednesday, April 15, 2020. Flag-waving, honking protesters drove past the Michigan Capitol on Wednesday to show their displeasure with Gov. Gretchen Whitmer’s orders to keep people at home and businesses locked during the new coronavirus COVID-19 outbreak. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

HIDE CAPTION

SHOW CAPTION

Even scarier: Based on their calculations, the scientists found that the droplets can hover in the air anywhere from eight to 14 minutes after they’re released.

While the findings sound frightening, it doesn’t change much about what scientists already know about COVID-19, infectious disease expert Dr. Amesh A. Adalja, senior scholar at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security, tells Yahoo Life. “It’s important to remember that the study itself wasn’t showing coronavirus transmission,” he says. “What we know is that coronavirus is spread through droplets that fall to the ground, usually within 6 feet of the infected person.”

“We have known for some time that talking and laughing produces droplets. To talk and laugh, we need to exhale air from our lungs out through our mouths. The same process occurs when we cough and sneeze,” Dr. Jonathan Parsons, a pulmonologist at the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, tells Yahoo Life. “Most people know that coughing and sneezing generates droplets, but fewer may be aware that talking does as well.”

Adalja says it’s “a leap” to assume these findings mean that everyone with COVID-19 is releasing that many infected droplets into the air that will hover for up to 14 minutes. “The epidemiology of spread doesn’t support that people are getting the virus through these infected droplets hovering in the air,” he says. Instead, Adalja says, research and epidemiological data so far have found that people are more likely to contract the virus if they have close personal contact with an infected person.

Dr. Kavita Patel, a nonresident fellow at the Brookings Institution and Yahoo Life Medical Contributor, agrees. “It’s not like if someone with COVID-19 is talking with force that I’ll be infected if I’m walking through that area 10 minutes later,” she tells Yahoo Life. “It’s most likely happening from close contact.”

Still, Patel points to recent research conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention — along with this new report — as evidence that people should be wary of coming into close contact with others outside their own household. That particular study found that 87 percent of people in a choir group in Washington state developed COVID-19 from one infected member in the group. “That article, plus this article, illustrates to me that people should be wearing nonmedical masks, particularly in closed spaces,” Patel says.

The latest findings are “consistent with what we know so far,” Dr. Stanley Weiss, a professor in the department of medicine at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, tells Yahoo Life. “But the validation is an important step,” he continues. “We still know relatively little about this virus.”

Weiss points out that it’s currently unclear how many respiratory droplets it takes to infect another person. “We often think that a single particle might be destroyed in some way or our immune system may be able to overcome it,” he says. “With COVID-19, we don’t know how many are needed to transmit infection.”

(Graphic Quinn Lemmers for Yahoo Life)

(Graphic Quinn Lemmers for Yahoo Life)

So what does all of this mean? If you start to meet up with friends again as local regulations allow, Patel recommends being cautious about how you approach it. “Stay 6 feet apart, meet them outside and wear a mask,” she says. “We should not be sitting in a closed, cramped coffee house together.”

Even though wearing a mask is recommended, Patel points out that masks are not perfect. “Wearing a mask itself doesn’t guarantee you won’t get the virus,” she says. “It only filters out about 60 percent of the virus, which is why we add that to social distancing.”

Overall, the latest findings only reinforce what we already know, Dr. Laila Woc-Colburn, an associate professor and medical director of infectious diseases at Baylor College of Medicine, tells Yahoo Life. “It’s nothing new and nothing to panic about,” she says.

For the latest coronavirus news and updates, follow along at https://news.yahoo.com/coronavirus. According to experts, people over 60 and those who are immunocompromised continue to be the most at risk. If you have questions, please reference the CDC’s and WHO’s resource guides.

Read More