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report states

Four states report record number of new COVID-19 cases | TheHill – The Hill

Wisconsin, Minnesota, Oregon and Utah all hit records for single-day increases in the number of COVID-19 infections Friday as the country surpassed 7 million total cases, according to an analysis by Reuters

Reuters reported that, according to its tally, Wisconsin had the largest number of new infections out of the four states on Friday at 2,629, surpassing its previous record of 2,533 cases last Friday. However, as of Saturday morning, the Wisconsin Department of Health Services website recorded only 2,504 newly confirmed cases Friday. 

Your #COVID19_WI update and another day with more than 2,500 reported cases, plus 65 people hospitalized. Please, protect yourself and your community: stay home if you can, physical distance, #MaskUpWisconsin, and wash hands often. #YouStopTheSpread: https://t.co/azIna3TqRR pic.twitter.com/InUQDFyBl7

— WIDeptHealthServices (@DHSWI) September 25, 2020

The Minnesota Department of Health recorded 1,191 new cases on Friday, while Utah reported nearly 1,370 and Oregon recorded close to 460. 

Today we reached an alarming milestone: the single highest daily total of COVID-19 cases in Oregon since the onset of this pandemic. We don’t want to lose ground on all of the great progress we’ve made. Please keep distancing, wearing a face covering, and washing your hands. https://t.co/owqVkcc0Ag

— Governor Kate BrownKate BrownCalifornia fire becomes largest in state history Pac-12 moves toward ‘return to competition’ after Big Ten announces resumption of football season Oregon opens first mobile morgue amid wildfires MORE (@OregonGovBrown) September 26, 2020

Minnesota Gov. Tim WalzTim WalzGOP Senate candidate says Trump, Republicans will surprise in Minnesota Presidential race tightens in Minnesota as Trump plows resources into state National Guard activated in Minneapolis after homicide suspect’s reported suicide MORE (D) announced on Twitter on Friday that the state would be holding free COVID-19 testing in various cities next week amid the state’s spike in cases. 

Reuters said in its analysis that all Midwestern states excluding Ohio reported more cases over the past four weeks than in the four weeks prior. 

The outlet also reported that hospitalizations of COVID-19 patients hit new highs in Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wyoming this week. 

These numbers come after Wisconsin Gov. Tony EversTony EversWisconsin governor declares emergency amid surge in infections Poll worker fired for not wearing a mask sues Wisconsin governor Coronavirus lockdowns work MORE (D) on Tuesday declared a new public health emergency following spikes in cases on college campuses in the state. The governor also extended the state’s mandatory mask mandate. 

In the order, Evers activated the Wisconsin National Guard to provide support on Election Day and oversee community testing locations. 

“We need folks to start taking this seriously, and young people especially—please stay home as much as you are able, skip heading to the bars, and wear a mask whenever you go out. We need your help to stop the spread of this virus, and we all have to do this together,” Evers said in a statement on Tuesday

In a video address tweeted by Wisconsin’s health department Friday, Evers said that “Wisconsin is now experiencing unprecedented, near-exponential growth of the number of COVID-19 cases in our state,” adding that a larger portion of cases came from young people aged 18-24. 

“It is critical that we work together now to get this virus under control, not only to protect our campus communities, but for the health and safety of Wisconsinites in every corner of our state,” Evers said in the video. 

“Wisconsin is now experiencing unprecedented, near-exponential growth of the number of COVID-19 cases in our state.” @GovEvers says it’s critical that we work together to get #COVID19_WI under control. Get information about how #YouStopTheSpread: https://t.co/azIna3TqRR pic.twitter.com/RH4GLB0lZw

— WIDeptHealthServices (@DHSWI) September 25, 2020

As of Saturday morning, The New York Times reported that more than 7,059,200 people in the U.S. have been infected with the virus since it hit the country, leaving more than 200,000 people dead.

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Fauci states

The 7 States Dr. Fauci Is Most Worried About Right Now – MSN Money

Citizens in these states need to be extra cautious this Labor Day weekend, he warns.

Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, speaks at the National Press Club in Washington.
ZUMA Press, Inc. / Alamy

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The nation’s top infectious disease expert just warned that seven states could see a new surge in COVID-19 infections if citizens aren’t careful over Labor Day weekend. In an interview with Bloomberg News, published on Sept. 3rd, Anthony Fauci, MD, reeled off a list midwestern states that are “starting to see an increase in the percent positive of their testing; that is generally predictive that there’s going to be a problem.”

Given that a holiday weekend is here, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases has been making the case this week that Americans should not let their guard down and should continue to abide by COVID-19 mitigation efforts designed to limit the spread of the virus. (After all, both Memorial Day and July 4th weekends were followed by a surge in cases.) But he seems especially concerned about the seven states we’ve listed right here—all of which referenced in his interview with Bloomberg News. Read on to see if yours is among them. And for more essential coronavirus coverage, make sure you’re fully up-to-speed on the 98 Longest Lasting COVID Symptoms You Need to Know About.

north dakota geographical map state natural wonders
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According to COVID-19 infection tracker rt.live, North Dakota currently has the third-worst infection rate in the nation. Over the past three weeks, the number of daily infections here has tripled, going from 60 positive tests on Aug. 17th to 362 new cases on Sept. 3rd, according to The New York Times.

south dakota geographical map state natural wonders
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South Dakota has struggled with the coronavirus of late. It currently has the worst infection rate in the nation, according to rt.live. A big reason for the state’s troubles? The annual bicycle rally recently held in Sturgis, an event that has led to the spread of the virus across the country. According to the NY Times, South Dakota had 50 new infections on Aug. 11th. But that number has grown exponentially in the past four weeks, with 334 new cases on Sept. 3rd. And for more reasons to be concerned about the ongoing pandemic, know that this Alarming New Research Predicts How Many COVID Deaths We’ll See by Year’s End.

iowa geographical map state natural wonders
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Iowa currently has the fourth-worst infection rate in the country, according to rt.live. At the beginning of last month, The Hawkeye State had 182 new infections reported on Aug. 3rd. But a full month later, the state reported 1,230 news cases on Sept. 3rd, according to the NY Times. College town Iowa City and Ames are currently seeing the worst outbreaks in the nation.

arkansas geographical map state natural wonders
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Arkansas’s new infection rate is causing concern, as well. On Sept. 1st, the state reported just 273 new cases. But two days later, that number had tripled, according to the NY Times. Some encouraging news for Arkansans, however, is that their current infection rate is relatively healthy compared to the rest of the country.

missouri geographical map state natural wonders
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Missouri has seen a steady rise in its infection rate since the beginning of June, according to rt.live. The reason Dr. Fauci mentioned Missouri, however, is likely due to a recent rise in daily cases from 389 on Aug. 3rd to 1,372 on Sept. 3rd.

indiana geographical map state natural wonders
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Daily infections reported by authorities in Indiana have shot up from 509 on Aug. 19th, to 1,118 on Sept. 3rd, according to the New York TimesAccording to rt.live, Indiana’s infection rate is the 18th worst in the nation.

illinois geographical map state natural wonders
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Illinois currently has the 7th worst infection rate in the nation, according to rt.live. According to the NY Times, the state has had a steady increase in reported infections since Memorial Day weekend. However, the 7-day average of daily infections has plateaued over the past two weeks.

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Multiple states

Multiple states ready suit against Trump admin over mail-in voting fears – ABC News

Official says suit could seek to stop postmaster general’s cuts to service.

August 17, 2020, 9:27 PM

6 min read

A group of Democratic state attorneys general are now in the final stages of preparing legal action against the Trump administration for recent cost-cutting changes made to the United States Postal Service, a lawsuit that one official said could demand a halt to any cutbacks that could impede mail-in voting.

As many as 10 state attorneys general are now involved, two state officials involved in the effort told ABC News. Among them is New York’s Letitia James, who called recent changes at the postal agency “deeply disturbing” in a statement released Monday.

“I, along with numerous other state attorneys general from around the nation, are now swiftly examining every legal option to protect the postal service and Americans’ right to vote absentee,” James said.

The suit is expected to mount two major constitutional challenges to the recent cutbacks, according to one of the officials, a state government attorney. States will assert that the federal government is trying to impede their constitutional right to oversee their own elections. And they will argue that the Trump administration is interfering with every American’s individual right to participate in the election.

The lawsuit will also argue that Postmaster General Louis DeJoy failed to follow administrative procedures when he made cuts to overtime and decommissioned equipment – steps the states will ask the courts to halt, the attorney said.

Some of the elected officials involved sought to hold back further details on the lawsuit, which the two sources said could land as early as Tuesday.

“I’m not going to give away our whole strategy,” said Connecticut Attorney General William Tong on Monday morning on MSNBC. “But we have a plan to address the service breakdowns that have already occurred.”

The attorneys general from Connecticut and New York have joined a growing list of state leaders including those from Virginia, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, North Carolina, Minnesota and Washington — all Democrats — in discussing how to sue the administration, sources said. Those conversations remain ongoing.

Asked about the impending lawsuit, White House Deputy Press Sarah Matthews dismissed it.

“Politically motivated lawsuits are not rooted in giving Americans the power of the vote,” Matthews said in a statement to ABC News. “While Democrats are spreading baseless conspiracy theories about the Trump administration’s assistance to the USPS to score political points, President Trump will continue to work to ensure the security and integrity of our elections.”

The United State Postal Service did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Maryland Attorney General Brian Frosh, a Democrat, said his office has been inundated with letters and calls raising concerns about the potential for cutbacks at the Post Office to impede voting.

“Trump attacks on the postal service are designed to disrupt the election,” Frosh said. “They strike at the core of our democracy. That is bad enough, but he and DeJoy are also hurting innocent bystanders: Americans who are waiting for their medicine or their social security checks. This conduct is harmful, illegal and unconstitutional. We will take whatever steps necessary to protect Marylanders.”

With more Americans expected to vote by mail in the upcoming election than ever before, Democrats have raised issue with a series of cost-cutting reforms enacted by DeJoy, a longtime Republican financier and Trump donor who was appointed in May.

Critics say those measures have slowed mail service, prompting questions about whether it is part of a concerted effort to undermine absentee voting — a platform the president has repeatedly, and without evidence, said would lead to election fraud.

President Trump denied on Monday the he had attempted to slow mail service ahead of the election. “I have encouraged everybody to speed up the mail, not slow the mail,” he said.

On Monday, House Democrats announced that DeJoy had agreed to testify before Congress on August 24.


ABC News


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Preparing states

Here Are The States—And City—The CDC Is Preparing For A Coronavirus Vaccine – Forbes

TOPLINE

Federal officials have asked four states and one city to make plans for when doses of the Covid-19 vaccine become available, according to a Washington Post report, signalling progress toward an antidote which could be ready as early as fall. 

US-HEALTH-VIRUS-VACCINE-TRIALS

A lab technician sorts blood samples for COVID-19 vaccination study at the Research Centers of … [+] America in Hollywood, Florida.


AFP via Getty Images

KEY FACTS

California, Florida, Minnesota, North Dakota and Philadelphia were reportedly instructed this week by federal agencies, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), to begin planning how they would distribute the vaccine. 

They were asked to draw up proposals regarding storage and transportation that will be shared with other states to help with their planning. 

These states will also have to prioritize who should get the vaccine first, which will likely be essential workers and front-line healthcare professionals. 

Contrary to Trump’s insistence that the military will deliver vaccines to states, a Health and Human Services official clarified the Defense Department will control logistics, while “commercial distribution partners” will make sure states receive doses. 

On Friday, the president announced a new partnership medical supplier McKesson, which will play a central role in rapidly distributing the vaccine when it’s ready. 

Nancy Messonnier, director of the CDC’s National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, emphasized this week the need to complete plans before October 1 as that’s the soonest the vaccines could be available. 

Crucial Quote 

“Frankly, we’re sort of running out of time,” Messonnier said during a Wednesday meeting with state immunization officials and experts. “If the vaccine is going to be available by Oct. 1, which it may be, we need to have plans before then.” 

Key Background 

The Trump administration has pushed to have a coronavirus vaccine ready in record time through Operation Warp Speed, aiming to have tens of millions of doses ready by January in a process that usually takes years. President Trump said on Friday that three experimental vaccines are in later-stage trials. Drug manufacturers have already started with clinical trials, testing the potential Covid-19 vaccines on over 30,000 people. 

Further Reading 

“These are the top coronavirus vaccines to watch” (The Washington Post)

“Trump announces deal with McKesson to distribute covid-19 vaccine” (The Washington Post)

Full coverage and live updates on the Coronavirus

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states United

United States Consulate in Chengdu no longer belongs to the US – CNN


United States Consulate in Chengdu no longer belongs to the US – YouTube






































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Record states

Six US states see record surges in COVID-19 cases, Florida becomes epicenter – New York Post

July 10, 2020 | 8:04pm | Updated July 10, 2020 | 9:58pm

Six U.S. states suffered record spikes in new COVID-19 cases on Friday and Florida, an epicenter of the pandemic, saw infections rise sharply for the second day in a row as the Walt Disney Co. stuck to its plans to reopen its flagship theme park in Orlando.

The surges in Georgia, Louisiana, Montana, Ohio, Utah and Wisconsin put the United States on a pace to once again set a single-day record for new coronavirus cases as Walt Disney World became the latest flash point in a national debate over access to public spaces.

The Walt Disney Co. said the theme parks in Orlando would open on Saturday to a limited number of guests, requiring all visitors and employees to undergo temperature checks and wear face masks and cancelling parades, firework displays and other crow-drawing events.

Disney’s chief medical officer said this week that she believed the broad set of safeguards the company developed with health experts would allow guests to visit the park safely.

Roughly 19,000 people, including some theme park workers, have signed a petition asking Disney to delay the reopening. The union representing 750 Walt Disney World performers has filed a grievance against the company, alleging retaliation against members over a union demand that they be tested for COVID-19.

A Disney spokeswoman said Disney World would reopen without the performers after Actors Equity union representatives had not been available for further talks. Seven other unions reached agreements with Disney on returning to work.

Other theme parks opened in Orlando in June, including Comcast Corp’s Universal Studios Orlando and SeaWorld Entertainment Inc’s SeaWorld.

Florida recorded 11,433 new coronavirus cases on Friday, the state health department said, just short of the state’s record high and more evidence that it was at the center of the U.S. pandemic.

Florida does not disclose the number of hospitalized COVID-19 patients but earlier this week more than four dozen Florida hospitals reported their intensive care units were full.

This month, Florida has repeatedly reported more new daily coronavirus cases than any European country had at the height of their outbreaks. Its positive test rate, at 19% earlier this week, is one of the highest in the country.

Florida Governor Ron DeSantis, a Republican, angered some residents and medical experts by calling the spike a “blip.”

On Friday, DeSantis said that the state would receive more than 17,000 vials of the antiviral drug remdesivir from the U.S. government, adding: “That’ll be something that will hopefully help to improve patient outcomes.”

Scott Burkee, a 43-year-old former Disney employee from Davenport, Florida, said DeSantis “has shown zero effort to control the spread, he only becomes concerned when Trump does. The virus is clearly out of control.”

Trump, a Republican, traveled to Florida on Friday for an event at the U.S. military’s Southern Command and a campaign fundraiser.

The president has sparred with state and local officials and teachers unions over the reopening of schools and said on Friday the Treasury Department would re-examine the tax-exempt status and funding of those that remain closed.

Trump previously vowed to cut federal funding to the schools and eject foreign students attending universities in the United States unless their schools offer in-person classes, although most education funds come from state and local coffers.

The United States has the world’s highest known numbers of both COVID-19 cases and deaths. The number of confirmed U.S. infections is over 3 million, according to a Reuters tally, stoking fears that hospitals will be overwhelmed.

More than 133,000 Americans have died, a toll that experts warn will likely surge along with the rise in cases.

Overall, coronavirus cases are rising in 44 American states, based on a Reuters analysis of cases for the past two weeks compared with the prior two weeks.

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Severe states

States with severe coronavirus outbreaks should ‘seriously look at shutting down,’ Dr. Fauci says – CNBC

Dr Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases, testifies during a Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions (HELP) Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., June 30, 2020.

Kevin Dietsch | Reuters

States with rapidly expanding coronavirus outbreaks should seriously consider “shutting down” like the country did when the virus first hit the U.S. in March, White House health advisor Dr. Anthony Fauci said.

His comments Wednesday come as the U.S. continues to push records for new cases reported each day, driven primarily by states in the South and West, across the so-called Sun Belt.

“What we are seeing is exponential growth. It went from an average of about 20,000 to 40,000 and 50,000. That’s doubling. If you continue doubling, two times 50 is 100,” Fauci said on a Wall Street Journal podcast. “Any state that is having a serious problem, that state should seriously look at shutting down. It’s not for me to say because each state is different.”

On Thursday, however, Fauci said states should not necessarily think about it as a complete shutdown, according to the Hill, but rather that states should update their restrictions, tailoring them to what is currently known about the virus. 

“Rather than think in terms of reverting back down to a complete shutdown, I would think we need to get the states pausing in their opening process, looking at what did not work well and try to mitigate that,” Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, told The Hill’s Editor-at-Large Steve Clemons. “I don’t think we need to go back to an extreme of shutting down.”

Earlier this week, the U.S. reported a record single-day spike of 60,021 confirmed cases. Arizona, California, Florida and Texas have accounted for nearly half of all new cases in the U.S. in recent days.

The country has reported about 52,444 new cases per day on average over the past seven days, up 20.3% compared with a week ago, according to a CNBC analysis of data collected by Johns Hopkins University. The seven-day average has a hit a record high every day for the past two weeks, according to CNBC’s analysis.

Despite a major surge in Florida, Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis has previously said the state will not order businesses to close again. Though local officials in particularly hard-hit counties and cities might take matters into their own hands.

“We’re not going back, closing things. I don’t think that that’s really what’s driving it, people going to a business is not what’s driving it,” DeSantis said on June 30. “I think when you see the younger folks, I think a lot of it is more just social interactions, so that’s natural.”

The surge in cases across much of the U.S. has been driven by some states that reopened too early, said Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. He added that people who failed to practice public health guidance even if their state officials tried to encourage it have also driven the spread of the virus. 

Florida, for its part, was among the first states to reopen, with DeSantis allowing most restaurants and stores to open with modifications on May 4.

“Among the states, and there’s admission from within, some states went too fast, some states went according to what the timetable was, but the people in the state didn’t listen and just threw caution to the wind,” he said. “Some states, it gets frustrating, because, not to name any states, but some states admittedly opened up too early and too quickly, so that was something that probably should not have happened that led to this.”

Even as new cases have skyrocketed, the average age of an infected person has fallen in many states. That’s significant because younger and otherwise healthy people are less likely to become severely sick or die from Covid-19. However, Fauci said the more young people who are infected, the more likely they will pass the virus on to a vulnerable person who’s older or has an underlying condition that places them at greater risk of dying.

“To say that it’s benign is not true, because we’re already seeing the hospitalizations going up in these states,” he said. “We’re seeing the intensive care beds are now almost being fully occupied, so this is not inconsequential what’s going on. It’s having an impact.”

The seven-day average of hospitalizations rose by at least 5% in 25 states on Wednesday, according to a CNBC analysis of data compiled by the Covid Tracking Project, an independent volunteer organization launched by journalists at The Atlantic.

To get the outbreak under control, Fauci urged Americans to follow public health guidance and to take the threat of the virus seriously. He added that U.S. officials ought to better coordinate their messaging to more effectively reach the American people.

“Obviously, you’d like to see a consistent message all along that people understand,” he said. “But for better or worse, unfortunately, that’s not exactly what’s going on.”

— CNBC’s Nate Rattner contributed to this report.

Correction: States with rapidly expanding coronavirus outbreaks should seriously consider “shutting down,” White House health advisor Dr. Anthony Fauci said Wednesday. An earlier version misstated the day.

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reporting states

Only two US states are reporting a decline in new coronavirus cases – CNN

(CNN)Only two US states are reporting a decline in new coronavirus cases compared to last week — Connecticut and Rhode Island.

A rise was reported in a staggering 36 states, including Florida, which some experts have cautioned could be the next epicenter for infections.
Florida reported 9,585 new coronavirus cases Saturday, a single-day record since the start of the pandemic. The number rivals that of New York’s peak in daily cases in early April.
While Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis said the state’s surge in cases in the past week was the result of a “test dump,” officials there and across the US have also warned of an increase in cases among younger groups.
That’s all as the US broke another record, reporting the highest number of new cases in a single day Friday with at least 40,173 new infections.
The daunting numbers could be the tip of the iceberg: A survey by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggests the total number of coronavirus infections across the US could actually be six to 24 times greater than reported.
As cases spike, US travelers are “unlikely” to be allowed into the European Union as the bloc begins opening up to international travel, several EU diplomats told CNN.
Officials in parts of the US are now trying to reel in the spread of the virus — which many experts have said is spiraling out of control — by making pleas to the country’s young population to keep their distance, urging the use of face masks and halting their reopening plans.
The US has now hit more than 2.5 million infections and at least 125,539 deaths, according to Johns Hopkins University.

Where new cases are on the rise

The 36 states reporting a rise in cases are: Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin and Wyoming.
Cases are tracking steady in Delaware, Indiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Nebraska, New Hampshire New Jersey, New York, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota and Virginia.

States hit pause on reopening

At least 12 states halted or rolled back their reopening plans in hopes of curbing the spread of the virus.
Washington Gov. Jay Inslee announced Saturday he’s hitting the pause button on the state’s reopening plan due to rising cases. Some counties were preparing to enter the fourth phase of reopening, “which would essentially mean no restrictions,” the governor’s office said in a statement.
“Phase 4 would mean a return to normal activity, and we can’t do that now,” the statement said. “This is an evolving situation and we will continue to make decisions based on the data.”
Texas Gov. Greg Abbott also announced last week he’d pause any further phases to reopen the state.
“I ask all Texans to do their part to slow the spread of Covid-19 by wearing a mask, washing their hands regularly, and socially distancing from others. The more that we all follow these guidelines, the safer our state will be and the more we can open up Texas for business.”
A day later, Abbott also said he was closing bars and limiting restaurant capacity.
Arizona’s governor has also announced that the state’s reopening is on pause as a result of a major spike in cases.
“We expect that our numbers will be worse next week and the week following,” Gov. Doug Ducey said.

Pleas to young groups

In recent days, officials across the US have reported a rise in cases among younger groups. In Mississippi, officials pointed to fraternity parties as one of the drivers behind the state’s cases.
“There is a sense that a lot of young people, well you’re young so you feel a little bit more invincible but, respectfully, often that can be a selfish mindset,” Newsom said.
In Florida, Gov. DeSantis said while the median age for those infected with the virus in March was in the 60s, in the past two to three weeks it’s dropped to people in their early 30s.
The governor urged younger groups to be vigilant, saying while they may not be at risk for serious complications, they can pass the virus on to someone who is. The state’s community transmission, he said, is “being driven by that 18 to 35-year-old group.”
“You have a responsibility to be careful if you’re in contact with somebody who is more vulnerable,” he said. “We’ve been stressing avoiding the three Cs which are: closed spaces with poor ventilation, crowded places with many people nearby and close-contact settings, such as close-range conversations.”
In addition to potentially spreading the virus to older people and those with compromised immune systems, family physician Dr. Jen Caudle said, young people face their own risks and it’s important they not consider it “a walk in the park.” She’s had young patients suffer strokes, and others who’ve experienced shortness of breath, fatigue or loss of smell and taste long after their recovery, she said.
“Just because young people tend to fare better doesn’t mean that they always do,” she said. “It’s really important that we wear our masks, that we social distance. Especially in places where Covid is increasing, it’s honestly best to stay home.”

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states trigger

Here are the 8 states that trigger coronavirus quarantines for travelers going to New York – CNBC

As coronavirus outbreaks surge in several states across the country, public officials in the New York tri-state region — once the epicenter of the U.S. outbreak — are now imposing a 14-day quarantine on travelers coming from several hot spots in the U.S. 

The virus hit the tri-state region hard in March and April, when New York state was reporting around 10,000 new cases every day. At the peak of the outbreak in the northeast, Florida, Texas and other states issued mandatory quarantine orders for anyone traveling from New York, New Jersey and Connecticut in an attempt to prevent outbreaks in their states.

But after suffering through a severe economic shutdown and ramping up testing and contact tracing to isolate new outbreaks, New York, New Jersey and Connecticut have driven down new cases to a few hundred per day. As new cases have dropped in the Northeast, the virus has spread across new communities mostly across the American South and West, sparking fresh outbreaks that appear to be picking up speed.

“We worked very hard to get the viral transmission rate down,” New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said. “We don’t want to see it go up because a lot of people come into this region and they can literally bring the infection with them.”

The governors of New York, New Jersey and Connecticut said they have issued the mandatory quarantine orders for these eight states specifically because they have an average of more than 10 positive tests per 100,000 residents over the past seven days or because an average of more than 10% of all tests have come back positive over the past seven days. 

New York, New Jersey and Connecticut will continue to update the list of states the order affects on their respective websites, Cuomo’s office said. 

Here’s a look at how the coronavirus outbreaks are evolving in the eight states currently subject to the tri-state region’s travel order.

Alabama

Alabama Public Health reported 954 new cases on Wednesday alone, about 19.5 new cases per 100,000 residents, marking the state’s third highest single-day increase in cases. The state has averaged more than 597 new cases per day over the past seven days, down more than 23% compared with the 7-day average a week ago, according to a CNBC analysis of data compiled by Johns Hopkins University. 

As of Wednesday, the state confirmed 31,624 coronavirus cases since the beginning of the pandemic, more than 644 cases per 100,000 residents, based on Covid-19 data from the state and population data from the U.S. Census Bureau. The virus has killed at least 879 people in Alabama and put 2,567 people across the state in the hospital  so far. 

While testing has increased across Alabama, the percent of tests coming back positive has risen to 10.9% between June 14 and June 20, according to the most recent data reported by the state. That figure has drifted up from 8.2% reported in the beginning of May.

Alabama was among the states to ease restrictions meant to curb the spread of the virus comparatively early. Gov. Kay Ivey, a Republican, allowed the statewide stay-at-home order to expire on April 30, allowing retail stores to reopen with restrictions. Restaurants, salons and gyms were allowed to reopen with new safety rules on May 11 and entertainment venues were allowed to reopen on May 22. 

“Threat of COVID-19 is not over,” the governor said when in announcing he would allow the stay-at-home order to expire. “We are still seeing the virus spread and all of our people are susceptible to the infection.”

Arkansas

The Arkansas Department of Health reported 709 new cases since Tuesday, about 23.5 new cases per 100,00 residents. The state has averaged more than 498 new cases per day over the past seven days, up just 12.1% compared with the 7-day average a week ago, according to a CNBC analysis of data compiled by Johns Hopkins University.

The state has reported a total of 17,375 confirmed coronavirus cases across the state, more than 575 cases per 100,000 residents, based on Covid-19 data from the state and population data from the U.S. Census Bureau. The virus has killed at least 237 people across the state and hospitalized 1,214 people since it took hold in Arkansas.

The percent of total tests coming back positive stands at 6%, according to the state, which is just above the World Health Organization’s recommended threshold of less than 5% before moving further into reopening.

Arkansas is among the few states that never issued a statewide stay-at-home order. However, Gov. Asa Hutchinson, a Republican, did order some businesses, including bars, restaurants and gyms to close. Hutchinson allowed gyms and indoor athletic facilities to reopen with modifications on May 4, followed by restaurants on May 11.

Hutchinson previously said he opposes requiring people to wear masks, but amid the surge in cases, some local and city officials have moved to mandate masks when in contact with others. 

Arizona

The Arizona Department of Health Services reported 1,795 new cases Wednesday, about 24.6 new cases per 100,000 residents. The state has averaged more than 2,741 new cases per day over the past seven days, up more than 76% compared with the 7-day average a week ago, according to a CNBC analysis of data compiled by Johns Hopkins University.

The state has reported 59,974 confirmed cases since the outbreak started, or more than 823 confirmed cases per 100,000 residents across the state, based on Covid-19 data from the state and population data from the U.S. Census Bureau. The virus has now killed at least 1,463 people in Arizona, according to the state’s data. 

The number of people in hospitals across the state jumped Wednesday to a record high of 6,705. Statewide, 86% of hospital beds are now in use and 88% of all ICU beds are occupied, according to data from the Arizona Department of Health Services. 

Republican Gov. Doug Ducey has been hesitant to implement new restrictions or to rollback the reopening of businesses in order to curb the spread of the virus. It wasn’t until last week and under pressure from officials in some of the state’s largest cities that Ducey adjusted the statewide mask policy to allow local officials to require that residents wear masks in public and in businesses.

In making the announcement, the governor also acknowledged that the virus is spreading more quickly than is acceptable. He had previously said that officials expected cases to rise after the state eased restrictions and reopened businesses on May 15.

“We want to slow and contain the spread,” he said one week ago. “We have successfully slowed the spread of Covid-19 in the past. We’re going to successfully slow Covid-19 again.”

Florida

The Florida Department of Health reported 5,508 new coronavirus cases on Wednesday, shattering the previous record single-day increase of 4,049 new cases reported on Saturday. Wednesday’s jump represents about 25.6 new cases per 100,000 residents. 

The state has averaged 3,342 new cases per day over the past seven days, up more than 65% compared with the 7-day average a week ago, according to a CNBC analysis of data compiled by Johns Hopkins University.

The latest spike brings the state total to 109,014 confirmed cases over the course of the outbreak, or more than 507 cases per 100,000 residents, based on Covid-19 data from the state and population data from the U.S. Census Bureau. The virus has killed at least 3,281 people in Florida, according to the state’s data.

In addition to rising cases, the percentage of tests coming back positive is also on the rise, indicating that the surge in confirmed cases is not due solely to ramped-up testing. The state reported that 15.9% of all tests came back positive Wednesday, up from 10.8% on Tuesday. 

While new cases continue to increase across Florida, the average age of an infected person has continued to decline. On Wednesday, the state reported that the average age of patients was 33 years old, down from over 65 years old in March. 

Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis has pointed to the decreasing average age of patients as evidence that the state is effectively protecting its most vulnerable residents. Younger people are less likely to become severely sick and die from Covid-19, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. However, White House coronavirus advisor Dr. Anthony Fauci warned Tuesday that scientists are seeing “more and more” complications with Covid-19 in young people.

Florida was among the first states to reopen, with DeSantis allowing most restaurants and stores to open with limited capacity on May 4. The heavily populated Miami-Dade and Broward counties did not reopen until May 18. On June 5, most of the state moved deeper into reopening, allowing more stores to operate, some at full capacity. Gyms also reopened. 

Last week, after the state reported a previous record single-day increase in infections, DeSantis said the state would not reimplement more restrictions to curb the spread of the virus.

“We’re not shutting down. We’re going to go forward … We’re not rolling back,” the governor said at a news briefing last week. “You have to have society function.”

North Carolina

The North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services reported 1,721 new cases Wednesday, nearly 16.4 new cases per 100,000 residents. The state has averaged more than 1,247 new cases per day over the past seven days, up just 0.6% compared with the 7-day average a week ago, according to a CNBC analysis of data compiled by Johns Hopkins University.

The state has reported a total of 56,174 cases, more than 535 cases per 100,000 residents, based on Covid-19 data from the state and population data from the U.S. Census Bureau. The virus has now killed at least 1,271 people in North Carolina, according to the state’s data.

As cases have risen, so have hospitalizations. The state says 906 people are currently hospitalized across the North Carolina due to Covid-19, up from 650 on June 1. 

Gov. Roy Cooper, a Democrat, left the stay-at-home order in place until May 22, but began amending it earlier to ease restrictions while he also allowed more businesses to reopen. Stores were allowed to reopen with some modifications on May 8, and other businesses, including restaurants, were allowed to reopen when the stay-at-home order expired on May 22. 

In lieu of a statewide mandate, some local and city officials around the state have begun to require that residents wear masks when in contact with others. 

South Carolina

South Carolina reported 890 new cases across the state on Tuesday, the most recent data available, about 17.3 new cases per 100,000 residents. The state has averaged more than 940 new cases per day over the past seven days, up over 38% compared with the 7-day average a week ago, according to a CNBC analysis of data compiled by Johns Hopkins University.

The state has reported 26,613 total coronavirus cases, or about 517 cases per 100,000 residents in the state, according to Covid-19 data from the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control and population data from the U.S. Census Bureau.

The state has ramped up the number of diagnostic tests it’s conducting, but the percent of tests coming back positive remains high, 17.4% as of Tuesday, according to the state. That indicates that the surge in new cases is not solely driven by increased testing and that the virus is spreading widely.

Last week, as cases were steadily ticking upward, state epidemiologist Dr. Linda Bell pleaded with the public to practice social distancing and wear masks.

“There is no vaccine for COVID-19. There are only individual behaviors and actions we must all maintain that help stop its spread,” she said. “This virus does not spread on its own. It’s spread around our state by infected people who carry it wherever they go – their work, the supermarket, the post office, a friend’s house.”

Republican Gov. Henry McMaster was among the last to implement a stay-at-home order and one of the first to end it on May 4. But he began to allow some businesses to reopen with restrictions even earlier, on April 20. 

Utah

The Utah Department of Health reported 364 new cases on Monday, according to the most recent data available, which is about 11.35 new cases per 100,000 residents. The state has averaged more than 480 new cases per day over the past seven days, up more than 41% compared to the 7-day average a week ago, according to a CNBC analysis of data compiled by Johns Hopkins University.

The state has reported 18,300 total confirmed cases of the cornavirus, about 570 confirmed infections per 100,000 residents, according to Covid-19 data from the state and population data from the U.S. Census Bureau. At least 163 people have died due to Covid-19 in Utah as of Monday, according to the state.

The virus is spreading most rapidly in southeastern San Juan County, according to the state’s data. 

Utah was one of the few states that never issued a statewide stay-at-home order. However, on March 17, Gov. Gary Herbert, a Republican, ordered restaurants and bars to pause dine-in service. He later ordered other businesses, including gyms and hair salons, to close as well.

Texas

The Texas Department of Health and Human Services reported a record spike of 5,551 new cases on Wednesday, about 19.1 new cases per 100,000 residents. The state has averaged more than 4,194 new cases per day over the past seven days, a jump of 91% compared to the 7-day average a week ago, according to a CNBC analysis of data compiled by Johns Hopkins University.

Texas has reported a total of 120,370 cases, roughly 415 cases per 100,000 residents, according to Covid-19 data from the Texas Department of Health and Human Services and population data from the U.S. Census Bureau. The virus has killed at least 2,249 people in Texas, according to the state’s data.

Hospitalizations in Texas are on the rise, too, with the state reporting that 4,389 Covid-19 patients are currently in hospitals statewide. That’s up from 2,518 a week ago, according to state data.

In an interview Tuesday with TV station KBTX in San Antonio, Republican Gov. Greg Abbott urged residents to wear a mask and practice social distancing to prevent infection. 

“The hospitalization rate is at an all-time high. Coronavirus is spreading in Brazos County and across the entire state of Texas, which is exactly why action is being taken,” he said. “The safest place for you is at your home.”

Texas was another state among the first to reopen. Abbott allowed the stay-at-home order to end on April 30 and by May 1, all stores, restaurants, movie theaters and malls were allowed to reopen with modifications.

— Graphics by CNBC’s Nate Rattner.

Update: This story was updated to reflect that Cuomo’s office later revised its list of affected states, removing Washington state. “There was a temporary discrepancy with Washington State’s reporting, however, they have since corrected it and we have removed them from the list of states under travel advisory,” Caitlin Girouard, Cuomo’s press secretary, told CNBC.

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Coronavirus states

Half of US states see coronavirus spike as officials warn first wave far from over – The Guardian

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