Categories
drills Street

Wall Street drills Costco stock because it’s paying workers $2 more an hour during COVID-19 – Yahoo Finance

TipRanks

3 ‘Strong Buy’ Stocks With Over 7% Dividend Yield

Markets are volatile, there can be no doubt. So far this month, the S&P 500 has fallen 9% from its peak. The tech-heavy NASDAQ, which had led the gainers all summer, is now leading the on the fall, having lost 11% since September 2. The three-week tumble has investors worried that we may be on the brink of another bear market.The headwinds are strong. The usual September swoon, the upcoming election, doubts about another round of economic stimulus – all are putting downward pressure on the stock markets.Which doesn’t mean that there are no opportunities. As the old saw goes, “Bulls and bears can both make money, while the pigs get slaughtered.” A falling market may worry investors, but a smart strategy can prevent the portfolio from losing too much long-term value while maintaining a steady income. Dividend stocks, which feed into the income stream, can be a key part of such a strategy.Using the data available in the TipRanks database, we’ve pulled up three stocks with high yields – from 7% to 11%, or up to 6 times the average dividend found on the S&P 500 index. Even better, these stocks are seen as Strong Buys by Wall Street’s analysts. Let’s find out why.Williams Companies (WMB)We start with Williams Companies, an Oklahoma-based energy company. Williams controls pipelines connecting Rocky Mountain natural gas fields with the Pacific Northwest region, and Appalachian and Texan fields with users in the Northeast and transport terminals on the Gulf Coast. The company’s primary operations are the processing and transport of natural gas, with additional ops in crude oil and energy generation. Williams handles nearly one-third of all US commercial and residential natural gas use.The essential nature of Williams’ business – really, modern society simply cannot get along without reliable energy sources – has insulated the company from some of the economic turndown in 1H20. Quarterly revenues slid from $2.1 billion at the end of last year to $1.9 billion in Q1 and $1.7 billion in Q2. EPS in the first half was 26 cents for Q1 and 25 cents for Q2 – but this was consistent with EPS results for the previous three quarters. The generally sound financial base supported the company’s reliable dividend. Williams has been raising that payment for the past four years, and even the corona crisis could not derail it. At 40 cents per common share, the dividend annualizes to $1.60 and yields an impressive 7.7%. The next payment is scheduled for September 28.Truist analyst Tristan Richardson sees Williams as one of the midstream sector’s best positioned companies.“We continue to look to WMB as a defensive component of midstream and favor its 2H prospects as broader midstream grasps at recovery… Beyond 2020 we see the value proposition as a stable footprint with free cash flow generation even in the current environment. We also see room for incremental leverage reduction throughout our forecast period on scaled back capital plans and even with the stable dividend. We look for modestly lower capex in 2021, however unlike more G&P oriented midstream firms, we see a project backlog in downstream that should support very modest growth,” Richardson noted.Accordingly, Richardson rates WMB shares as a Buy, and his $26 price target implies a 30% upside potential from current levels. (To watch Richardson’s track record, click here)Overall, the Strong Buy analyst consensus rating on WMB is based on 11 Buy reviews against just a single Hold. The stock’s current share price is $19.91 and the average price target is $24.58, making the one-year upside potential 23%. (See WMB stock analysis on TipRanks)Magellan Midstream (MMP)The second stock on our list is another midstream energy company, Magellan. This is another Oklahoma-based firm, with a network of assets across much of the US from the Rocky Mountains to the Mississippi Valley, and into the Southeast. Magellan’s network transports crude oil and refined products, and includes Gulf Coast export shipping terminals.Magellan’s total revenues rose sequentially to $782.8 in Q1, and EPS came in at $1.28, well above the forecast. These numbers turned down drastically in Q2, as revenue fell to $460.4 million and EPS collapsed to 65 cents. The outlook for Q3 predicts a modest recovery, with EPS forecast at 85 cents. The company strengthened its position in the second quarter with an issue of 10-year senior notes, totaling $500 million, at 3.25%. This reduced the company’s debt service payments, and shored up liquidity, making possible the maintenance of the dividend.The dividend was kept steady at $1.0275 per common share quarterly. Annualized, this comes to $4.11, a good absolute return, and gives a yield of 11.1%, giving MMP a far higher return than Treasury bonds or the average S&P-listed stock.Well Fargo analyst Praneeth Satish believes that MMP has strong prospects for recovery. “[We] view near-term weakness in refined products demand as temporary and recovering. In the interim, MMP remains well positioned given its strong balance sheet and liquidity position, and ratable cash flow stream…” Satish goes on to note that the dividend appears secure for the near-term: “The company plans to maintain the current quarterly distribution for the rest of the year.”In line with this generally upbeat outlook, Satish gives MMP an Overweight (i.e. Buy) rating, and a $54 price target that implies 57% growth in the coming year. (To watch Satish’s track record, click here)Net net, MMP shares have a unanimous Strong Buy analyst consensus rating, a show of confidence by Wall Street’s analyst corps. The stock is selling for $33.44, and the average price target of $51.13 implies 53% growth in the year ahead. (See MMP stock analysis on TipRanks)Ready Capital Corporation (RC)The second stock on our list is a real estate investment trust. No surprise finding one of these in a list of strong dividend payers – REITs have long been known for their high dividend payments. Ready Capital, which focuses on the commercial mortgage niche of the REIT sector, has a portfolio of loans in real estate securities and multi-family dwellings. RC has provided more than $3 billion in capital to its loan customers.In the first quarter of this year, when the coronavirus hit, the economy turned south, and business came to a standstill, Ready Capital took a heavy blow. Revenues fell by 58%, and Q1 EPS came in at just one penny. Things turned around in Q2, however, after the company took measures – including increasing liquidity, reducing liabilities, and increasing involvement in government-sponsored lending – to shore up business. Revenues rose to $87 million and EPS rebounded to 70 cents.In the wake of the strong Q2 results, RC also started restoring its dividend. In Q1 the company had slashed the payment from 40 cents to 25 cents; in the most recent declaration, for an October 30 payment, the new dividend is set at 30 cents per share. This annualizes to $1.20 and gives a strong yield of 9.9%.Crispin Love, writing from Piper Sandler, notes the company’s success in getting back on track.“Given low interest rates, Ready Capital had a record $1.2B in residential mortgage originations versus our $1.1B estimate. Gain on sale margins were also at record levels. We are calculating gain on sale margins of 3.7%, up from 2.4% in 1Q20,” Love wrote.In a separate note, written after the dividend declaration, Love added, “We believe that the Board’s actions show an increased confidence for the company to get back to its pre-pandemic $0.40 dividend. In recent earnings calls, management has commented that its goal is to get back to stabilized earnings above $0.40, which would support a dividend more in-line with pre-pandemic levels.”To this end, Love rates RC an Overweight (i.e. Buy) along with a $12 price target, suggesting an upside of 14%. (To watch Love’s track record, click here)All in all, Ready Capital has a unanimous Strong Buy analyst consensus rating, based on 4 recent positive reviews. The stock has an average price target of $11.50, which gives a 9% upside from the current share price of $10.51. (See RC stock analysis on TipRanks)To find good ideas for dividend stocks trading at attractive valuations, visit TipRanks’ Best Stocks to Buy, a newly launched tool that unites all of TipRanks’ equity insights.Disclaimer: The opinions expressed in this article are solely those of the featured analysts. The content is intended to be used for informational purposes only. It is very important to do your own analysis before making any investment.

Read More

Categories
Colon-Cancer Street

Colon-Cancer Q&A: What to Know – Wall Street Journal

The death of actor and “Black Panther” star Chadwick Boseman at 43 years old shines a spotlight on the risk of colon cancer, especially “young onset” colorectal cancer which is on the rise among people under the age of 50. Here are a few things to know about the disease.

What is colon cancer, and what are the symptoms?

Colon cancer, also called colorectal cancer, starts in the colon in the digestive system and tends to grow slowly over many years. It usually begins as a growth of tissue called a polyp, and removing the polyp…

Read More

Categories
beats Street

Ford beats Wall Street earnings expectations after coronavirus shuttered factories – CNBC

Visitor walk past a Ford Escape Titanium at the Shanghai Auto Show in Shanghai on April 17, 2019.

Greg Baker| AFP | Getty Images

Ford Motor performed far better than Wall Street expected during the second quarter, even beating its own expectations as the coronavirus caused rolling shutdowns of its plants across the globe.

The company was profitable, reported less operational losses than expected and has already started repaying against credit lines it drew down earlier this year to manage through the coronavirus pandemic.

Here’s how Ford performed versus what Wall Street expected, based on average analysts’ estimates compiled by Refinitive.

  • Adjusted EPS: A loss of 35 cents per share versus a loss of $1.17 per share expected.
  • Automotive revenue: $16.6 billion versus $15.95 billion expected.

Shares of Ford jumped more than 4% in post-market trading after releasing its earnings Thursday evening. The stock closed at $6.74, down 2.6%.

Ford reported an adjusted pretax loss of $1.9 billion – more than $3 billion better than expected. 

Ford CFO Tim Stone warned investors in April that the company expected to lose more than $5 billion, on an adjusted pretax basis, during the second quarter as the pandemic shuttered factories and severely hampered auto sales.

Quicker recovery

A faster-than-expected recovery in sales, including favorable pricing and better mix, as well as “operational execution” contributed to the company’s second-quarter performance, Stone told reporters Thursday.

Ford expects an adjusted pretax profit of between $500 million and $1.5 billion in the third quarter as long as economic conditions remain favorable without production disruptions, Stone said.

The company managed to report a net profit of $1.1 billion during the second quarter, including a $3.5 billion gain on a previous investment in autonomous vehicle startup Argo AI.

An Argo-modified Ford autonomous vehicle parked in Manhattan on Friday, July 12, 2019.

Paul Eisenstein | CNBC

Cash burn

Ford burned through $5.3 billion during the second quarter, up from $2.2 billion during the first quarter — numbers that are being closely tracked by Wall Street. The automaker said it ended the second quarter with automotive liquidity of $39.8 billion.

Investors are also watching for any guidance on when Ford might pay down its debt and for updates to an $11 billion restructuring plan led by Ford CEO and President Jim Hackett.

“They’ve got a ton of cash. They’re certainly not going to run out of money this year,” Morningstar analyst David Whiston told CNBC ahead of Ford’s earnings release. “Ford’s problem, as they’ve said in their own words, they’re not physically fit.”

General Motors, which reported its second-quarter earnings Wednesday, said it lost $536 million on an adjusted basis, which was better than Wall Street expected.  On an unadjusted basis, the company lost $806 million and it burned through $7.8 billion in cash during the quarter.

Both Ford and GM roughly doubled their automotive debt to $30 billion during the first quarter to help bolster their balance sheets and get through the Covid crisis.

GM said Wednesday it expects to repay a $16 billion revolving credit line it drew down in March by the end of the year.

Ford said Thursday it has already repaid $7.7 billion against revolving credit lines, and also extended $4.8 billion of its three-year revolving credit lines. 

Read More

Categories
shifts Street

Wall Street shifts bets to big pharma as COVID-19 vaccine race progresses – Yahoo Finance

FILE PHOTO: A logo for Pfizer is displayed on a monitor on the floor at the NYSE in New York

By Carl O’Donnell and Sujata Rao

(Reuters) – Wall Street is moving some bets on COVID-19 vaccines to large pharmaceutical companies with robust manufacturing capabilities, signaling that a love affair with small biotech firms might be ending after the sector’s best quarter in almost 20 years.

Early signs of the shift came Wednesday, when positive data for one of Pfizer Inc’s COVID-19 vaccine candidates sent shares of the large U.S. drugmaker up more than 3%. Shares of its partner on the vaccine, Germany’s BioNTech SE, have been flat on the data.

Although the news had little effect on shares of Pfizer’s large rivals in the vaccine race, smaller peers Moderna Inc and Inovio Pharmaceuticals Inc, both of which have previously shown promising COVID-19 data of their own, ended down more than 4% and 25%, respectively. Inovio partially rebounded Thursday.

For the week so far, shares of bigger players in the vaccine race, such as Johnson & Johnson and Merck , have also outperformed Inovio and Moderna.

Some of the selling was likely driven by end-of-quarter profit-taking, locking in dizzying gains in an otherwise turbulent market. Moderna and Inovio shares have risen nearly 200 percent and 540 percent in the year-to-date, respectively, greatly eclipsing gains for large pharmaceutical companies.

Analysts say investors are changing their strategy to focus on companies that can make, as well as discover, a vaccine and that the risk reward profile for some biotechs is less favorable after their stunning gains so far this year.

“I would certainly say success by Pfizer, AstraZeneca, or Johnson & Johnson could make it more challenging for smaller companies, given size and scale and manufacturing capability,” said Vamil Divan, a biotechnology analyst at Mizuho.

Smaller biotechnology companies with promising COVID-19 vaccines pose a special challenge for investors, said Justin Onuekwusi, a portfolio manager at Legal & General Group Plc.

Because of their limited manufacturing capabilities, investors in those stocks are effectively betting that the company or its drug will be bought by larger companies, he said.

“In smaller cap stocks like biotech, it all tends to be quite binary so fundamental or detailed analysis don’t always work,” Onuekwusi said.

Medical manufacturers have never faced a challenge like that of producing a global COVID-19 vaccine.

Companies including Pfizer and Johnson & Johnson have said they each aim to produce as many as 1 billion doses by the end of 2021.

There are more than 17 vaccine candidates being tested on humans in a frantic global race to end a pandemic that has infected 10 million people and killed more than half a million. Drugmakers have released early stage human trial data for five vaccine candidates so far.

Bernstein Research analyst Vincent Chen said COVID-19 vaccines could generate in excess of $10 billion in annual revenue, but many investors are struggling to determine their value.

“In

Read More

Categories
futures Street

Dow futures fall as Wall Street weighs states’ reopenings, China-U.S. tensions – MarketWatch

Market Snapshot

‘We have to get it back open safely but as quickly as possible,’ says Trump at a town hall meeting hosted by Fox News

President Donald Trump speaks during a Fox News virtual town hall from the Lincoln Memorial on Sunday.


AP

U.S. stock-index futures fell sharply in thin trading Sunday evening as investors contended with states’ reopenings amid signs of brewing conflict between China and the U.S. over Beijing’s handling of the coronavirus outbreak, which was first identified in Wuhan.

How are benchmarks performing?

Futures for the Dow Jones Industrial Average
YMM20,
-1.00%

were headed 228 points, or 1%, lower at 23,391, those for the S&P 500 index
ESM20,
-0.89%

were off 26.70 points, or 1%, at 2,795, while Nasdaq-100 futures
NQM20,
-0.75%

retreated 87 points, or 1%, at 8,631.

NQ00,
-0.75%

The major benchmarks booked losses for the week after a sharp decline on Friday, with the Dow
DJIA,
-2.55%

and S&P 500
SPX,
-2.80%

losing 0.2% and the Nasdaq Composite Index
COMP,
-3.20%

ending the week 0.3% lower.

What’s driving the market?

An attempt to restart the economies of dozens of U.S. states hasn’t come without problems, amid warmer weather that has lured larger gatherings of people out onto the streets in the midst of the worst viral outbreak in more than a century.

Some 51 summonses were issued by New York police, the Wall Street Journal reported, with the majority for social-distancing violations, in the state where there have been some 70,000 hospitalizations from COVID-19, the highest number of any state.

President Donald Trump, fielding questions from a virtual town-hall meeting Sunday night aired by Fox News, suggested that the need is strong to reopen the country’s businesses, which have been shuttered due to measures in place to slow down the spread of the deadly disease.

“We have to get it back open safely but as quickly as possible,” Trump said.

Trump’s comments come as the economy has gone into contraction, with data for the first quarter showing that a 4.8% decline in the annual rate of growth, while more than 30 million people, and counting, have filed for unemployment benefits since the end of February.

Against that backdrop, markets have managed to mostly rebound on hopes of success with experimental treatments for the deadly disease, including Gilead Sciences’
GILD,
-4.82%

remdesivir, and signs of a stabilization of new cases.

However, the main equity benchmarks snapped a streak of two straight weeks of gains on Friday, as markets digested the recent moves and as the U.S. continued to place blame on China for its handling of the pandemic.

On Sunday, U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, in an interview on ABC’s “This Week, ”said he has seen “enormous evidence” that the virus originated in a laboratory in Wuhan, China.

Trump during his Sunday night Fox appearance said: “I think they made a horrible mistake and they didn’t want to admit it.”

Meanwhile, investors may also focus on remarks made by Warren Buffett on Saturday, during Berkshire Hathaway’s
BRK.B,
-2.50%

annual shareholder meeting, which was via webcast. The venerated, 89-year-old investor adopted a reassuring posture, but also noted that the virus created a lot of uncertainty in financial markets. “We’ve faced tougher problems, and the American miracle, the American magic, has always prevailed, and it will do so again,” Buffett declared.

The billionaire investor, however, acknowledged that he dumped his holdings of airlines, including Delta Air Lines Inc.
DAL,
-6.90%
,
American Airlines Group Inc.
AAL,
-11.40%
,
United Airlines Holdings Inc.
UAL,
-10.00%

and Southwest Airlines Co.
LUV,
-6.46%
.

Which stocks are in focus?

Shares of Delta, American Airlines, Southwest and United Airlines will be in focus on Monday, as well as airline-focused exchange-traded fund U.S. Global Jets ETF
JETS,
-7.24%
.

Boeing Co.
BA,
-5.42%
,
the aeronautics and defense contractor, also may be in focus after Buffett on Saturday referred to the company as “hard to evaluate.”

Read More